Easy Homemade Shampoo

Shampoo is one of those “necessary evils” in life. No one wants to go around with a greasy mop, but the products designed to clean said mop are usually full of unhealthy ingredients that can pollute your scalp and your local ecosystem. The solution? Homemade shampoos. And before you write off the idea of homemade shampoo as the domain of hippies, rest assured that these recipes really do get your hair clean and shiny!

Basic Homemade Shampoo
½ cup water
½ cup castile (vegetable-based) liquid soap such as Dr. Bronner’s
1 teaspoon light vegetable oil or glycerine (omit if you have oily hair)

Combine ingredients, mix well, and put in a recycled shampoo bottle. Use a palm full or less to lather once, and rinse with warm water.

This is thinner than commercial shampoo and it won’t suds much—but it will clean just as well.

Herbal Homemade Shampoo
Substitute ½ cup strong herbal tea (chamomile, lavender, and rosemary are good choices) for water in the Basic Shampoo recipe.

Faux Homemade Shampoo
If you want to know the real secret to truly healthy hair, grab a box of baking soda and some apple cider vinegar. Online bloggers rave about how much better their hair looks after a few weeks of using them (it can take a while for your hair to adjust).

Put a few tablespoons of baking soda in the bottom of a re-purposed squeeze bottle, top it off with hot water, and shake it well. After it settles for a few minutes apply ¼ cup to wet hair, work it through with fingers, and rinse it out. There are no suds, but the mixture leaves  hair clean and shiny. Follow that with this basic rinse. Mix ½ cup of apple cider vinegar, fresh lemon juice with 2 cups water. Pour it through your wet hair and rinse with cool water.

Egg Conditioner

1 egg yolk
½ teaspoon olive oil
¾ cup warm water

Right before you wash your hair with your homemade shampoo, beat the egg yolk until it’s frothy, add oil and beat again, then add water slowly while beating. Pour the mix through wet hair, working it in with your fingers. Allow it to set for a few minutes then rinse it out with warm water.

Deep Conditioner
For dry or damaged hair, a weekly conditioning pack can make a huge difference. You can use any of the following in combination or alone: olive oil, coconut oil, beaten egg, yogurt, mayonnaise, mashed banana, or mashed avocado. Massage any of these into wet hair, wrap it all up turban-style in an old towel for 20 minutes, and rinse well.

Herbal Color-Modifying Rinses
While none of these will turn blond hair black or black hair strawberry blond, using them on a regular basis can add highlights and even tonedown some graying strands.

• Strong chamomile tea, diluted lemon juice, or tea made with fresh rhubarb will lighten hair. For more pronounced results allow rinse to dry in hair—outside in the sunshine if possible.
• Strong sage, lavender, or cinnamon tea will darken hair and mellow out graying strands over time.
• Hibiscus flower tea will add reddish highlights to light hair.

Antistatic Treatment For Dry Hair
Put a small dab of natural hand lotion in one palm, rub hands together to coat both evenly, and run your fingers through your hair.

Natural Hair Gel
½ to 1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin
1 cup hot water

Dissolve gelatin in water, store in refrigerator between uses. Work into hair with finger tips, and style as desired.

Natural Hair Spray
½ orange
½ lemon
2 cups water

Chop fruit finely, simmer the pieces in water until they are soft and the liquid is half gone. Strain liquid into a small spray bottle, and store in refrigerator between uses. Spray finished hair lightly; dilute with water if sprayed hair is stiffer than you desire.

Calendula Oil

Marigold has much value today and in traditional cultures as a homeopathic remedy, but the oil extracted from the flowers, called calendula oil, is not far behind in providing benefits. Learn more about this oil distilled from the petals of the pot marigold or Calendula officinalis, and how you can harness its health and practical everyday uses.

What Is Calendula Oil?

Marigold is a genus of about 15 to 20 species of plants in the Asteraceae family. This flower is native to Southwestern Asia, as well as Western Europe and the Mediterranean. The common name “marigold” refers to the Virgin Mary, to which it is associated in the 17th century.

Apart from being used to honor the Virgin Mary during Catholic events, marigold was also considered by ancient Egyptians to have rejuvenating properties. Hindus used the flowers to adorn statues of gods in their temples, as well as to color their food, fabrics, and cosmetics.

Pot marigold or C. Officinalis is the most commonly cultivated and used species and is the source of the herbal oil. “Calendula” comes from the Latin word “calendae,” meaning “little calendar,” because the flower blooms on the calends or the first of most months. It should not be confused with ornamental marigolds of the Tagetes genus, commonly grown in vegetable gardens.

Calendula, with fiery red and yellow petals, is full of flavonoids, which are found naturally in vegetables and fruits and are substances that give plants their lovely bright colors.

Calendula oil is distilled from the flower tops and is quite sticky and viscous. It has a very strange smell described as musky, woody, and even rotten – like the marigold flowers themselves. This smell does not readily appeal to many individuals, even in when used in a remedy.

Uses of Calendula Oil

Here are three classifications of calendula plant and oil uses:

    1. Health and wellness – It has tonic, sudorific, emmenagogic, and antispasmodic properties, but it is mainly used for skin care and treatment. It has great anti-inflammatory and vulnerary action, making it helpful with stubborn wounds, acne, ulcers, bed sores, varicose veins, rashes, eczema, and related conditions. It addresses sore, inflamed, and itchy skin conditions.Calendula massage oil also greatly heals, soothes, and softens skin, making it a good addition to massage oils or when preparing a carrier oil blend.
    2. Cooking – Since the Middle Ages, the petals of marigold have been used as “the poor man’s saffron” for coloring cheeses, butter, and dishes. During the Elizabethan era, both petals and leaves were used in salads, although the latter showed to be very strong. The petals flavored soups and stews.
    3. Practical uses – Marigold has been used as a dye. Dried petals can also be added in potpourris.

Composition of Calendula Oil

In a study, calendula oil was obtained in low yield (0.3 percent) by steam distillation with cohabitation from flowers and whole plants. Identified by the researchers were 66 components, mainly sesquiterpene alcohols. α-cadinol was the main constituent, about 25 percent. The essential oil from the whole plant was found different from that of the flowers through the presence of monoterpenes hydrocarbons aside from the alcohols.

The principal constitutes of calendula essential oil are flavonoids, saponoside, triterpene alcohol, and a bitter principle. The useful components of calendula itself include a volatile oil, carotenoids, flavonoids, mucilage, resin, polysaccharides, aromatic plant acids, saponins, glycosides, and sterols.

Benefits of Calendula Oil

Calendula oil is traditionally used for abdominal cramps and constipation. It’s your skin that will receive a good bulk of the benefits, thanks to the oil’s anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and related properties. Here are some of the promoted benefits of this oil:

  1. Skin dryness or chapping – Calendula oil is a great moisturizer for dry skin and for severely chapped or split skin. It soothes the area and reduces the pain.
  2. Inflammation – It works well on swelling sprained muscles or bruises; its anti-inflammatory action helps lessen swelling from injury. Calendula oil also helps treat spider veins, varicose veins, leg ulcers, and chilblains.
  3. Baby care – The oil helps relief diaper rashes, which can extremely irritate an infant.
  4. Minor cuts and wounds – The antiseptic and antimicrobial action of the oil help speed up healing of wounds and minor cuts, and also benefit insect bites, acne, and bed sores.
  5. Skin issues – Eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, and other skin problems can be soothed using calendula oil, applied topically. Calendula oil’s antifungal action is also great for treating athlete’s foot, ringworm, and jock itch.

How to Make Calendula Oil

Calendula oil is extracted by steam distillation. There is almost no way to obtain 100 percent pure calendula essential oil, so this makes calendula essential oil an infusion and not a pure extract. In order to get the oil from the flower, the petals are steeped in oil, preferably olive oil. The oil left over when distillation is done is calendula oil, which should be a golden orange color.

You can create homemade calendula oil using the following instructions:

What you will need:

  • Dried calendula petals
  • Carrier oil (olive oil, almond oil, or sunflower oil are some great options)
  • A clean glass jar with a lid

There are two methods to infuse the oil:

  • Cold infusion method – This is the usually preferred techniques because it protects the delicate calendula from heat damage.
    1. Put your desired amount of dried calendula petals in a clean, dry glass jar.
    2. Fill the jar with your carrier oil of choice to cover the petals by an inch.
    3. Put in a sunny place to infuse for four weeks.
    4. Drain the petals from the oil and store the oil in a container with a lid for up to one year.
  • Hot infusion method – This method is much quicker than the cold infusion method but won’t have the same strength because of the presence of heat.
    1. Put your desired amount of dried calendula petals in a clean, dry glass jar.
    2. Fill the jar with your carrier oil of choice to cover the petals by an inch.
    3. Dump the entire contents of the jar (the petals and the oil) in a small saucepan or slow cookers. Heat on low for four hours, stirring occasionally.
    4. Let cool. Drain the petals from the oil and store the oil in a container with a lid for up to one year.

You can use the homemade calendula oil as an after-bath body oil, salve, baby oil, lotion, or home remedy for dry skin, inflamed areas, or rashes.

How Does Calendula Oil Work?

Calendula oil is used in various products, oftentimes as a great base for lotions, salves, creams, several natural cosmetics and personal care products, and herbal ointments. It also very commonly works as a base oil in aromatherapy. Furthermore, you can use calendula oil in an all-natural herbal hair color recipe.

You can create an infused oil by filling a jar with the dried flowers, which you cover with a carrier oil. You can get more out of these flowers by macerating the mixture in a blender. Leave it infused for two weeks or more to extract the flowers’ beneficial properties. When ready to use, filter the oil through cheesecloth, and use it directly in a balm or as part of a homemade cream or lotion.

Is Calendula Oil Safe?

Calendula oil is generally safe for use, but I advise you to heed the following safety guidelines and considerations:

  1. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should generally avoid using calendula oil. Do not take calendula by mouth, as there is a concern that it might cause a miscarriage. Avoid topical use as well.
  2. An allergic reaction may occur in individuals who are sensitivity to ragweed and related plants, such as marigolds, chrysanthemums, and daisies. Before using calendula oil, check with your doctor if you have allergies.
  3. Combined with medications used during and after surgery, calendula use might cause too much drowsiness and should be stopped at least two weeks before surgery.

Side Effects of Calendula Oil

If you are not pregnant, nursing, allergic, or about to undergo surgery, you can use calendula oil with likely no side effect. It is best, however, to consult your healthcare provider, especially for therapeutic use.

Remember, though, that sedative medications or CNS depressants interact with calendula. The plant extract might cause sleepiness and drowsiness, and taking it with sedative drugs might result in excess sleepiness. Some sedative drugs include clonazepam, (Klonopin), phenobarbital (Donnatal), and zolpidem (Ambien). I advise you to also explore safe, natural ways to get a good night’s sleep.

Lemongrass Oil

You may have tasted the refreshingly mild flavor of lemongrass, a herb that’s commonly added to foods and beverages. But have you ever tried using lemongrass oil, an all-around herbal oil with many health benefits? Keep on reading to discover more about lemongrass oil.

What Is Lemongrass Oil?

Lemongrass (Cymbopogon) is a tall perennial plant from the Poaceae grass family, which thrives in tropical and subtropical regions, such as in India, Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, China, and Guatemala. This plant grows in dense clumps and has bright-green, sharp-edged leaves, similar to grass.

Lemongrass is a popular flavoring in Asian cooking – added to curries and soups, or paired with beef, fish, poultry, and seafood. Fresh lemongrass is also used to make lemongrass tea.

There are over 50 varieties of lemongrass, but not all are edible or ideal for medicinal purposes. The two varieties of lemongrass most popularly used today are Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon flexuosus. While they can be used interchangeably, especially for making lemongrass oil, C. citratus is more popularly known in culinary applications, while C. flexuosus is more dominant in industrial applications, such as perfumery.

Lemongrass oil is extracted from the leaves of the plant. It has a thin consistency and a pale or bright yellow color. It has a strong, fresh, lemony, and earthy scent.

Uses of Lemongrass Oil

Lemongrass oil is a great addition to various skin care and cosmetic products, such as soaps, deodorants, shampoos, lotions, and tonics. It also works as an air freshener and deodorizer, especially when blended with other essential oils like geranium or bergamot. Simply put it in an oil burner, diffuser, or vaporizer.

Lemongrass oil is also known for its ability to repel insects, such as mosquitoes and ants, due to its high citral and geraniol content. Spray it around your home, diffuse it, or rub a diluted mixture on your skin.

Lemongrass oil’s refreshing scent makes it a valuable aroma therapeutic oil. It’s clean and calming aroma help relieves stress, anxiety, irritability, and insomnia, and prevent drowsiness.Lemongrass oil can also help relax and tone your muscles, as well as relieve muscle pain, rheumatism, period cramps, stomachache, toothache, migraines, and headaches.

Here are some ways to use lemongrass oil:

  • Make a refreshing foot bath. Add two drops to a bowl of warm water, and soak your feet for 10 minutes. If your feet are aching, add two tablespoons of Epsom salts.
  • Make a massage oil by mixing it with sweet almond or jojoba oil.
  • Kill your pet’s fleas and lice by spraying diluted lemongrass oil all over his coat. You can also soak his collar in it, add it to his final rinse after shampooing, or spray it on his bedding.
  • Blend it into your favorite bath products or add it to your bath water. 

Composition of Lemongrass Oil

The main compounds of lemongrass oil are geranyl acetate, myrcene, nerol, citronellol, terpineol, methyl heptenone, dipentene, geraniol, neral, farnesol, limonene, and citral. These are known to have anti-fungal, antiseptic, insecticidal, and counter-irritant properties.

Citral is known for its antimicrobial effects, and can help kill or suppress the growth of bacteria and fungi. It’s said that lemongrass oil’s quality is generally determined by its citral content.

Another beneficial compound in lemongrass is limonene, which helps reduce inflammation and kill bacteria, according to research.

Benefits of Lemongrass Oil

Lemongrass oil has analgesic, antimicrobial, antiseptic, carminative, astringent, antipyretic, fungicidal, bactericidal, and antidepressant properties, making it one of the most versatile and health-promoting essential oils. It works well for:

  • Inflammation – Lemongrass is an analgesic that can help reduce pain and inflammation, which can lead to many chronic diseases. According to a 2005 study by Dr. Sue Chao, lemongrass oil is one of the top six essential oils with anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Hair problems – If you’re struggling with hair loss, oily hair, and other scalp conditions, lemongrass oil may be beneficial as it can help strengthen your hair follicles. Just apply a diluted solution onto your scalp, and then rinse out.
  • Infections – Lemongrass can help kill both internal and external bacterial and fungal infections, such as ringworm and athlete’s foot.  In a 2008 study from the Weber State University in Utah, it was found that out of 91 essential oils tested, lemongrass ranked highest in inhibitory activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection.
  • Fever – The antipyretic effect of lemongrass oil helps bring down very high fever, especially when it is beginning to reach dangerous levels.
  • Digestive issues – A diluted lemongrass mixture helps facilitate nutrient assimilation and boosts the functioning of the digestive system, which is helpful for treating bowel problems and digestive disorders. It also prevents the formation of excessive gas and increases urination, which helps eliminate toxins from the body.

How to Make Lemongrass Oil

Lemongrass oil sold in the market today is made via steam distillation. But if you have lemongrass growing in your backyard, you can easily make this oil by infusing it with another carrier oil. Here’s a simple method:

Materials:

4 to 6 lemongrass stalks
Fine cheesecloth
Mortar and pestle
Carrier oil (Olive, rice bran, grapeseed, or any unscented natural oil)
Two jars
Dark glass container

Procedure:

  1. Get two lemongrass stalks and remove the leaves. Crush the stalks using a mortar and pestle (or any heavy object) to release the oil.
  2. Fill a jar with your carrier oil of choice and put the crushed stalk in it. Leave the jar for two days in a place where it can get plenty of heat and sunshine.
  3. After two days, strain the oil using the cheesecloth and transfer it into another jar. Make sure to press and squeeze the stalks until they’re completely dry.
  4. You may need to repeat the process using fresh new stalks to achieve the desired lemongrass fragrance. Just keep replacing the stalks every two days to increase the oil’s potency.
  5. Once you’ve reached the desired fragrance, transfer the oil into a dark glass container and leave it in a cool, dry and dark place. You can use this oil for a year or more.

How Does Lemongrass Oil Work?

Lemongrass oil is a tonic that influences and helps keep the systems in your body working properly, including the respiratory, digestive, nervous, and excretory systems. It also allows nutrients to be absorbed into the body, which keeps your immune system strong and robust.

Lemongrass oil can be diffused using a vaporizer, inhaled, applied topically, or ingested. To ensure the efficiency of lemongrass oil, you should use it depending on the health condition that you want to improve. For example, if you want to quell stress and anxiety, diffuse the oil using a vaporizer. But if you want to relieve muscle pain or use it to treat infections, it’s better to massage a diluted solution on the affected areas.

For internal health ailments, such as digestive issues, lemongrass oil can be taken internally in a diluted form. However, I do not recommend taking this oil orally without the supervision of a qualified healthcare provider.

Is Lemongrass Oil Safe?

Lemongrass oil is generally safe as long as it is used in small quantities (it is one of the strongest-smelling oils in aromatherapy) and properly blended with a carrier oil. Undiluted lemongrass can actually burn and injure your skin due to its high citral content, so it’s best to mix it with a carrier oil. Some of the best carrier oils you can use with lemongrass oil are basil, palmarosa, vetiver oil, lavender, rose, clary sage, patchouli, ginger, fennel, geranium, sandalwood, and cedarwood.

Our advice is doing a patch test before applying lemongrass oil on your skin, to see if you have any adverse reactions to this essential oil.

Side Effects of Lemongrass Oil

Skin irritation, discomfort, rashes and a burning sensation are some topical side effects experienced by people with sensitivity to lemongrass oil. Using the oil may also lead to lowered blood glucose, and may have contraindications for people who are taking oral diabetes drugs or antihypertensive medications, as well as those who are diabetic and hypoglycemic.

I do not recommend children, pregnant women, and nursing moms to use lemongrass oil orally. Those with liver or kidney disease and other health conditions should also consult their physician before using lemongrass oil.

Patchouli Oil

Beyond this oil’s unique aroma that’s associated with the “flower children” is a wealth of benefits that can soothe and heal you inside out. Discover more interesting facts about patchouli oil below.

What Is Patchouli Oil?

Patchouli oil is derived from a large evergreen perennial that is a member of the Labiatae family, and a close relative of mint, lavender, and sage. The name “patchouli” (Pogostemon cablin or Pogostemon patchouli) is said to be derived from the ancient Tamil words “patchai” and “ellai,” meaning “green leaf.” Others say it comes from the Hindustan word “patchoi,” meaning “to scent,” referring to its use as a fragrance.

Patchouli originates from Southeast Asia. Today, it’s cultivated in China, Malaysia, India, Indonesia, and the Philippines, but also grows in South America and other tropical regions like Hawaii.

Patchouli oil is extracted from the lightly fragrant leaves and the white, violet-marked flowers of the plant. It’s a thick, light yellow or brown liquid, with a strong, musky-earthy and slightly sweet aroma, reminiscent of wet soil. For some, the potent fragrance of this oil is an acquired taste.

What sets patchouli oil apart from other herbal oils is that it gets better with age. Its light yellow color turns into a deep amber, and the scent becomes smoother and richer.

Uses of Patchouli Oil

Patchouli has been used for thousands of years. It was very valuable – early European traders actually  exchanged one pound of patchouli for a pound of gold. Romans used it as an appetite stimulant, while in Egypt, it was said that Pharaoh Tutankhamun – also known as King Tut – arranged to have 10 gallons of patchouli oil buried with him in his tomb.

Patchouli oil has long been used in traditional Asian medicine, especially in Malaysia, China, and Japan. It is used to treat skin and hair problems, such as dermatitis, eczema, acne, dry chapped skin, dandruff, and oily scalp. It also has wound healing and scar reducing properties, as well as aphrodisiac effects. The link to sexual desire likely originated from India, where it is used in Tantric sexual practices.

Patchouli oil is also popularly used as a fabric fragrance, a practice that dates back to 19th-century India. Manufacturers used it as a moth repellent for fabrics that are exported to other countries. The scent was so widely used that it became an indicator of authentic Oriental fabric. English and French garment makers even became obliged to add patchouli oil to their imitation products to make them acceptable in the market.

Today, patchouli oil is used as a fragrance in skin and personal care products, air fresheners, laundry detergents, and paper towels. It’s also used as incense and as a base note for perfumes.

In aromatherapy, patchouli oil is said to help relieve anxiety, stress, and depression. Its calming effect is very effective for relaxation and meditation. Simply add a few drops in a diffuser or vaporizer. You can also mix it into your face cream, lotion, or shampoo, or even add it to your bathwater.

Here are other ways to use patchouli oil:

  • Massage it on your skin to help prevent wrinkles and cellulites. Simply dilute it in a light carrier oil.
  • Dab a small amount on your skin to soothe cuts, scrapes, burns, and sores, as well as insect bites.
  • Apply a few drops on your wrists or add it to your sheets to keep ants, bedbugs, and other pests away. 
  • Put two to three drops on a cotton ball and dab it on your underarms to prevent body odor.
  • Mix a couple of drops into your shampoo or conditioner to treat dandruff and oily hair. Leave it on for a few minutes before rinsing.

Composition of Patchouli Oil

The beneficial properties of patchouli oil come from its many constituents, such as alpha patchoulene, beta patchoulene, alpha bulnesene, alpha guaiene, caryophyllene, norpatchoulenol, patchouli alcohol, seychellene and pogostol. It also contains patchouli alcohol (PA), an important compound that has neuroprotective, anti-influenza, and anti-inflammatory activities.

Benefits of Patchouli Oil

Patchouli oil’s health benefits are attributed to its antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent, diuretic, and cytophylactic properties. It also works as a deodorant, diuretic, insecticide, and sedative. Patchouli oil can help address health conditions such as:

  • Inflammation – Patchouli oil can help soothe inflammation and/or irritation. It also works for inflammation-related conditions, like gout and arthritis.
  • Fungal infection – It inhibits fungal growth and gives you protection against notorious infections, such as athlete’s foot.
  • Colds and flu – Patchouli oil can bolster your immune system to help you avoid colds, influenza, and tonsillitis.
  • Fever – It helps fight infections that cause fever and reduces your body temperature.
  • Sexual problems(men and women) – It stimulates the sex hormones estrogen and testosterone, and helps boost your sex drive. It is useful for impotence, loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, and sexual anxiety.

Patchouli oil is a tonic that helps promote your overall well-being by toning your stomach, liver, and intestines to optimize metabolic function. It also helps regulate your endocrinal secretions of hormones and enzymes, and boosts your nervous and immune system health.

How to Make Patchouli Oil

The leaves of the patchouli plant are handpicked, bundled, and partially dried in the shade. They are  then fermented for a few days, until the oil is extracted via steam distillation or CO2 extraction.

However, you can make a basic patchouli oil infusion at home using dried patchouli leaves.

Materials:

  • Dried patchouli leaves
  • Jojoba, olive, or sweet almond oil
  • Glass jar
  • Cheesecloth
  • Saucepan
  • Clean bottle

Procedure:

  • Dry the patchouli leaves completely by putting them under the sun for a few hours.
  • Wash the glass jar thoroughly with warm soapy water, and then rinse it with fresh water at least two to three times. Let dry.
  • Put the patchouli leaves in the jar, filling it to the top. Pour the carrier oil of your choice. Jojoba oil works best for making a light moisturizing oil, while olive oil is ideal for making a massage oil. Sweet almond oil is good for body and scalp massage.
  • Screw the lid tightly and shake the jar a few times.
  • Pour water into your saucepan and bring to a boil. Then, take it off from the heat, and put the glass jar in the saucepan, leaving it there until the water cools down. Take out the jar and shake well again.
  • Store the jar in a cool, dry, and dark place for a month, allowing the patchouli leaves to seep in the carrier oil. Shake the jar thoroughly every day to mix the leaves with the oil.
  • Filter the mixture using the cheesecloth and funnel, and transfer the oil in a clean jar.

How Does Patchouli Oil Work?

Patchouli oil can be inhaled, diffused in a vaporizer, or applied directly to skin. Inhaling the scent of patchouli oil or absorbing it through the skin helps transmit messages to the limbic system, a brain region that’s involved in controlling emotions and influences the nervous system.

However, I advise using this oil in moderation because copious amounts can lead to a strong and overwhelming fragrance. The scent can also seep into fabric and furniture.

Is Patchouli Oil Safe?

Patchouli oil is safe when applied topically or inhaled. It can be used by itself, but can also be blended with other carrier oils. It mixes well with frankincense, clary sage, cedar, geranium, lavender, ylang-ylang, and rose oil. However, those with sensitive skin may have certain reactions to this herbal oil, so I recommend doing a patch test before using it. Keep it away from your eyes, ears, and nose.

You can ingest this oil by mixing a drop or two with a teaspoon of honey. I advise seeking the help of a qualified physician, though, before taking this oil orally. If you have gastric problems or any other medical contraindication, avoid ingesting this essential oil.

Some say that using patchouli oil during a pregnant woman’s first trimester is dangerous, but safe in the second and third trimester. For your safety, consult a health care professional before using this oil during the entire course of your pregnancy.

Side Effects of Patchouli Oil

Patchouli can cause over-stimulation and may have strong sedative effects when used in large amounts. It can also cause photo-sensitivity and appetite loss. If you’re suffering from an eating disorder or recovering from sickness, I advise you to not use this herbal oil.

Citronella Oil: The All-Natural Bug Repellent

If you are a fan of aromatherapy, you’re probably familiar with citronella oil. Citronella is also often added to a variety of personal care and cleaning products and provides numerous benefits.

What Is Citronella Oil?

citronella oilCitronella essential oil is obtained from the Cymbopogon genus plant family. More precisely, it is extracted through steam distillation of the grassesCymbopogon nardus (Jowitt) and Cymbopogon winterianus (Rendal). This results in two types of citronella oil:

  • Ceylon, which is obtained fromC. nardus and is a native product of Sri Lanka (previously Ceylon). Ceylon citronella oil has a warm, citrusy, and wood scent, and has a pale to dark yellow color.
  • Java, which is distilled from C. winterianus. It also has a fresh lemon-like scent but is darker in color. Between the two, java citronella is considered the one with the higher quality.

Uses of Citronella Oil

Citronella oil is popularly used as an insect repellent. In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classifies it as a bio-pesticide with a non-toxic mode of action. Citronella oil can be found in dozens of registered pesticide products, such as sprays, lotions, and candles. At times, it is added to sunscreen, wristbands, and flea collars. Due to its anti-fungal properties, citronella oil is also used to treat insect bites.

Citronella essential oil is one of the most common oils used in aromatherapy. It is said that as an aromatherapy oil, citronella can help treat and prevent colds, fevers, and headaches. As a massage oil, it may relieve pain in individuals suffering from arthritis.

The oil of citronella is also widely used in fragrances and personal care products. It is largely imported by Germany and France, two of the largest hubs for the perfume industry. Because of its antiseptic properties, citronella oil is also used in soaps, household cleaners, and detergents.

Citronella oil is also added as a food and beverage flavoring, such as in alcoholic drinks, frozen dairy, and gelatin and puddings.

  • Alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages
  • Baked products
  • Frozen dairy
  • Gelatin and puddings
  • Soft and hard candies

Additional research found that using citronella oil can help calm barking dogs.

Composition of Citronella Oil

Both types of citronella oil contain over 80 constituents, about 50 of which make up 90 percent of each oil. The main components of citronella oil are citronellol, citronellal, and geraniol. The two types of citronella oil vary in the amounts of geraniol and citronellal.

Below are the main constituents of each oil:

Ceylon Citronella Oil Java Ceylon Oil
Geraniol – 18 to 20 percent Citronellal – 32 to 45 percent
Citronellal – five to 15 percent Citronellol – 11 to 15 percent
Citronellol – 6.4 to 8.4 percent Geraniol – 21 to 24 percent
Geranyl acetate – two percent Geranyl acetate – three to eight percent
Limonene – nine to 11 percent Limonene – 1.3 to 3.9 percent
Methyl isoeugenol – 7.2 to 11.3 percent Elemol and sesquiterpene alcohols – two to five percent

Benefits of Citronella Oil

According to a paper in the International Journal of Advanced Research, citronella oil is noted for its efficiency in repelling mosquitoes – it provided about two hours of repellent in the study. It has proven successful in repelling the dreaded Aedes aegypti, a species of mosquito that spread diseases like dengue fever, chikungunya, and yellow fever. Apart from being used on humans, citronella oil is also used to keep ticks away from livestock and pets.

In a 2011 issue of Tropical Medicine & International Health, an analysis of 11 studies on the capabilities of citronella oil found that when combined with vanillin, the essential oil likely provided up to three hours of protection against mosquitoes. The study also pointed out comparable protection time against DEET, a chemical commonly found in chemical bug repellents.

The research stated that oil of citronella has potent anti-fungal properties that help suppress the growth of fungi species, such as Aspergillus, Penicillium,andEurotium. Citronella oil owes its antibacterial and antiseptic nature to compounds like methyl isoeugenol. These compounds prevent the growth of bacteria in your body and help treat wounds, as well as infections that may occur in the colon, urethra, bladder, gastrointestinal tract, prostate, and kidneys.

Citronella essential oil is often used in aromatherapy because it can provide relief from anxiety and a light feeling. It can also provide relief from menstrual cramps and muscle spasms. The oil can also help inhibit inflammation in the liver, stomach, and digestive tract.

How to Make Citronella Oil

Citronella oil is widely available in in natural food and beauty stores. However, commercial oils processed through steam distillation may be pricey. A more practical solution would be to make your own citronella oil at home,

Ingredients/Materials:

  • ¼ ounce nard grass leaves and stems (you may use lemongrass as substitute)
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • Slow cooker (ex. Crock-Pot)
  • Cheesecloth

Instructions:

  1. Mix the olive oil and nard grass leaves and stems in the slow cooker.
  2. Leave and cook the mixture for about four to eight hours.
  3. With the cheesecloth, strain the mixture, which is actually the citronella oil. Remove nard grass.
  4. Repeat steps 1-3 with the strained mixture with fresh nard grass leaves and stems. No need to add more olive oil. Keep on repeating until the oil obtains the desired scent.
  5. Once done, seal the oil in a dark-colored jar. Store in a cool, dry place.

How Does Citronella Oil Work?

While citronella oil helps prevent mosquito bites, it does not kill mosquitoes. It only repels these insects by blocking the scent that attracts these bugs, causing them to become disoriented.

Pure citronella essential oil should never be used directly on your skin, as this may cause sensitivities. It should be mixed with a carrier oil, like olive or coconut oil. Once diluted, citronella oil can also be inhaled. Just place a few drops onto a cloth or tissue, or using a diffuser.

You may use citronella by itself or mix it with other natural agents. I’ve created my own natural insect repellent by combining citronella with other essential oils like lemongrass oil, peppermint, and vanillin. Since this formulation is all-natural, it’s safe and risk-free for both adults and children.

Is Citronella Oil Safe?

Citronella oil is Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The EPA also considers oil of citronella safe, as it has very little or no toxicities. If ingested, the major compounds of citronella are eliminated through urination.

As I said earlier, avoid using pure citronella oil on your skin. Not only can this oil cause skin irritations or allergic reactions in people with sensitivities, it has been found to raise heart rate in some individuals.

Pregnant women should be careful with using citronella oil, as their skin is extra sensitive during those nine months. One research found that there was a loss of spontaneous contractions in the uterus upon the in vitro use of citronella oil. While citronella may be used cautiously as a fragrance during this time, it is important to consult a physician first.

Also, citronella oil should not be used on babies and young children due to their delicate skin. Parents should also be careful when administering the oil near the noses of children. Seek the advice of your pediatrician before using citronella oil on your children.

Cardamom in Aromatherapy

Cardamom (scientific name Elettaria cardamomum) is a perennial herb akin to reeds and is usually found growing in the wild. This herb is also widely cultivated in India and Sri Lanka (formerly known as Ceylon).

Cardamom belongs to the ginger family and its oil is obtained by steam distilling the seeds that have already undergone a prolonged (about three months) drying process. Cardamom seeds that have been dried for a long period yield oils that enclose the best possible levels of chemicals. While cardamom essential oil can be acquired from various regions of the world, currently Guatemala is said to have the most favorable conditions to produce the best quality and most powerful oil. The aroma of cardamom essential oil is sweet and spicy.

Cardamom trees usually grow up to a height of 4 meters (13 feet) and produce long, green glossy leaves. The flowers of cardamom are small and yellowish having a violet tip. Cardamom plants have a large, plump rhizome, akin to that of ginger. After the blossoming, the plants bear oblong-shaped grey hued fruits, each of which encloses numerous seeds.

Even in the ancient times, people were familiar with cardamom as well as its various therapeutic properties. For instance, the ancient Egyptians used cardamom essential oil in incense and perfumes. They also chewed cardamom seeds with a view to make their teeth whiter. On the other hand, the Romans used cardamom for treating stomach disorders whenever they over-indulged.

The early Arabs also pounded cardamom and used the powder in their coffee, while it has traditionally been a vital ingredient in Asian culinary. German physician and botanist Valerius Cordus was the first to steam cardamom to extract its essential oil in 1544 after the Portuguese explorations discovered the East.

Cardamom essential oil is extracted from the seeds of the herb’s fruit by a process known as steam distillation. The fruits are collected immediately before they mature. Usually, the yield of the essential oil varies between 1% and 5%.

Chinese as well as Indians have been using cardamom in their traditional medical practices for over 3,000 years now. This herb was used widely in Ayurveda, the traditional Indian medicine system. Even the early Greek physicians adopted this herb in the 4th century B.C. Hippocrates, who is regarded as the father of medicine in the West, was among the ancient Greek physicians who used this herb extensively. Currently, people widely use cardamom as a spice owing to its composition. Medicinally, the essential oil of cardamom is valued for its ability to heal gastro-intestinal (GI) problems. Traditionally, people have been using cardamom essential oil in the form of a tonic for the digestive, pulmonary as well as urinary systems, and also for reducing fever. In addition, this oil has also been employed by people for several centuries as an ingredient of several sensual aphrodisiac blends.

cardamomseeds

Several scientific researches have been undertaken to explore the therapeutic attributes of cardamom essential oil and it is generally employed for treating problems related to digestive and respiratory problems. In addition, this oil may also have the potential for supporting the health of the muscles. Cardamom essential oil is also said to possess uplifting, stimulating and stress-relieving properties (similar to any other essential oil). This oil also stimulates the mind and brings in clarity.

It is important to emphasize that compared to other essential oils, cardamom is safer as well as gentler for children. In fact, use of a number of essential respiratory and digestive oils like peppermint or eucalyptus is generally avoided for children and it is often difficult to find a suitable alternative solution. On the other hand, cardamom essential oil can prove to be a wonderful substitute for several digestive as well as respiratory requirements.

From the emotional and spiritual point of view, cardamom essential oil is frequently employed for issues related to anger and frustration. In fact, this oil can be used to successfully treat issues like frustration, outbursts, rage, blame, judging others and more. Use of cardamom essential oil is known to assist one in stepping back from any unfavorable situation and assess it from a different perspective, where one is not as attached. This oil may also assist one to bring in changes that necessitate him/ her to be sincere with them and acknowledge the liability for things that they may have been responsible for. Cardamom essential oil also helps one to possess the power to usher in changes in them.

The essential oil of cardamom is known to be very useful for treating muscular as well as respiratory spasms, and, in this way, helps to alleviate asthma, whopping cough, muscle cramps, and muscle pulls.

It is worth mentioning here that the essential oil of cardamom possesses extremely potent antiseptic as well as anti-microbial attributes. This oil is also safe for use by most people, including children. When cardamom essential oil is employed in the form of a mouth wash by adding some drops of it to water, it helps to make the oral cavity germ-free and also gets rid of foul breath. You can also add a few drops of this oil to drinking water to eliminate the germs in it. In addition, people also use cardamom essential oil in foods in the form of a flavoring agent as well as to protect foods form becoming spoiled due to microbial assault. You may also add a few drops of cardamom essential oil to your bath water, as this will help to make your skin and hair germ-free.

Cardamom essential oil is an excellent digestive agent. Consuming this oil improves digestion by invigorating the entire digestive system. This oil also possesses stomach properties – in other words, use of cardamom essential oil aids in sustaining the heath of the stomach and ensure its proper functioning. It also aids in ensuring the correct secretion of digestive fluids, including bile, acids and enzymes, into the stomach. Cardamom oil also works to protect the stomach from being infected.

The essential oil of cardamom helps to invigorate all the systems in our body. As a result of this stimulating or tonic effect, it uplifts the spirits, especially when one is suffering from fatigue or depression. Use of this oil also helps to stimulate secretion of various hormones and enzymes, circulation, peristaltic motion as well as excretion, thereby ensuring appropriate metabolic actions all over the body.

Use of cardamom essential oil has a relaxing or warming effect. In other words, this oil heats up the body, encourages perspiration, aids in clearing coughs and congestion of airways. At the same time, the essential oil of cardamom works to get rid of symptoms related to common cold. This oil also helps to alleviate headaches caused by ailments. You can also use cardamom oil to treat diarrhea due to severe cold.

The essential oil of cardamom also encourages urination, thereby reducing high blood pressure, and helps in losing weight, freeing the kidneys from calcium as well as urea deposits, and eliminating toxins.

Last, but not the least important, the essential oil of cardamom also possesses aphrodisiac properties and, hence, is effective in treating sexual weakness, impotence, erectile dysfunctions in males, frigidity and loss of libido.

General Properties:

  • antibacterial
  • anti-infectious
  • antiseptic
  • antispasmodic
  • aphrodisiac
  • decongestant
  • digestive
  • diuretic
  • expectorant
  • stimulant
  • stomachic
  • tonic
  • warming

Cardamom Blends Well With:

  • bergamot
  • caraway
  • cedarwood
  • cinnamon
  • cloves
  • orange
  • rose

General Uses:

  • anger
  • asthma
  • bad breath
  • common colds
  • cramps
  • diarrhea
  • erectile dysfunctions
  • frigidity
  • headaches
  • high blood pressure
  • impotence
  • loss of libido
  • muscular support
  • sexual weakness
  • stomach infections
  • stress
  • toxins removal
  • weight lose
  • whooping cough

Precaution:

Cardamom essential oil is considered to be safe for most people, as there are no reports of toxic side effects following the consumption of this oil. However, using this oil in excessive amounts may often lead to an overdose. When there is an overdose of cardamom essential oil, it will result in symptoms like uneasiness and too much heating up of the body as well as the digestive system. This may often cause irritation and loose bowels. As the warming effect or irritation caused by excessive use of cardamom essential oil may be detrimental for the baby, it is advisable that pregnant women as well as nursing mothers should stay away from this oil.

Aromatherapy Peppermint

Menta piperita

 Peppermint (botanical name Menta piperita) is basically a hybrid plant – a cross between the spearmint and watermint. Although the herb is native to Europe, presently it is grown across the globe. This perennial herb possesses numerous therapeutic properties that were identified and used by the Indians, Egyptians and Chinese since the ancient times. In order to avail the detoxifying attributes of the peppermint, the ancient Romans used to make wreaths with this herb and wear them as crowns during festivities. Owing to its sharp and spicy fragrance, peppermint is well accepted by most people.

The peppermint plant usually grows up to a height of 30 cm to 90 cm. The plant has smooth stems that are squares in cross section. The rhizomes or subterraneous roots of the plant are fleshy and travel far and wide, while the bare roots are fibrous. The plant bears deep green leaves with reddish veins that are 4 cm to 9 cm in length and 1.5 cm to 4 cm in width. The peppermint plant bears purplish blooms that have four-lobed corolla in whorls around the stem. The plant usually blossoms between mid and late summer.

The essential oil extracted from peppermint not only has a soothing effect, but it also rejuvenates the skin and is tremendously resourceful for domestic use. The oil possesses a clearing aroma that is effective in fighting fatigue and, at the same time, very stimulating. Use of this essential oil enhances the capability to concentrate as well as brings clarity of thoughts and decisions. Peppermint essential oil is said to be inspiring and revitalizing.

It may be mentioned here that irrespective of the herb, all essential oils are prepared solely using the herbs or the plants. This denotes that the essential oils do not enclose any outside element, such as moisturizer, which could dilute their attributes or potency. As a result, whenever bottles containing essential oils are opened, they exude an exceptionally strong smell.

Peppermint essential oil is beneficial for people enduring headaches, asthma, cramps, fainting, colic, flatulence, nausea, and fevers. It is known to be highly effective in relieving pains associated with these conditions. This oil also has the potential to alleviate the symptoms of insomnia, distress, tension, anxiousness, lethargy and/ or vertigo (light-headedness).

The essential oil extracted from peppermint can be used in various ways. Some of the different uses of peppermint essential oil are briefly mentioned below.

Provided you have a water spritzer (a container for two different liquids or drinks), fill it up with water and add a few drops of peppermint essential oil to it. If the bottles are small, you need to add just 15 to 20 drops of the oil, while you may add 20-30 drops of oil in medium-sized bottles. Shake the mixture of oil and water thoroughly and gently spray it on your bedding, curtains and also carpets as an alternative to a room deodorizer.

Get a small pot filled with water for boiling over a stove top. Add three to five drops of peppermint essential oil to the water and inhale the aromatic vapor. While doing so, ensure that you take deep and slow breaths enabling the mixture to infuse your lungs.

In aromatherapy, peppermint can be effectively used as a massage oil to alleviate a number of conditions. However, as in the case of any essential oil, remember to dilute the peppermint essential oil blending it with any suitable carrier oil before use. In fact, the moisturizers present in carrier oils help to make the skin smooth and softer – supple to touch. As the concentration of peppermint essential oil is extremely high, only a few drops (one to three) of it need to be added to a little amount of carrier oil.

These days, there are several stores that sell ceramic oil burners meant for aromatherapy. Generally, these ceramic oil burners have the appearance of archetypal, glass milk bottles, but are smaller having a small, detachable, saucer-shaped lid, underneath which one can position a tea-candle. When you have lit the candle, replace the lid and pour in a small quantity of peppermint essential oil in the lid. As the candle will heat the oil in the lid, the sharp and spicy aroma of peppermint will infuse the air. This will help to refresh your senses.

peppermint-essential-oilYou may also put in two to three drops of peppermint essential oil on a handkerchief and fold it before placing it under a pillow. While the delicate aroma of the oil will not be too intense for your nose, it will help in ensuring sound sleep.

As mentioned earlier, peppermint essential oil possesses numerous therapeutic properties and is, hence, used to treat a number of conditions. Its health benefits are many and some of them are briefly discussed below.

  • Since peppermint oil possesses potent antiseptic properties, it is very helpful in dental care. This oil not only helps to get rid of foul breath but also aids the gums and teeth to fight germs. Therefore, it is hardly surprising that peppermint essential oil forms the active ingredient in a number of toothpaste. In addition, like clove oil, peppermint essential oil is highly effective in healing toothaches.
  • The essential oil extracted from peppermint is also effective in alleviating digestive problems, while promoting digestion. On many occasions, people add a few drops of peppermint essential oil in a glassful of water and drink it following a meal with a view to facilitating digestion. The digestive properties of peppermint essential oil make it an excellent tonic for those enduring poor appetite. This oil also possesses carminative properties and, hence, is effective in expelling gas formed in the stomach and intestines, thereby, providing relief from flatulence and bloating. In addition, this essential oil is also useful when one is suffering from an upset stomach or motion sickness. Initial researches have established that a blend of peppermint essential oil and caraway oil can also be used to effectively treat heartburns.
  • Peppermint essential oil is also a good home remedy to cure a headache and nausea. Topical application of watered down peppermint oil on the forehead is helpful in providing relief from headaches.
  • As in the case of the majority of the essential oils, peppermint essential oil also has the aptitude to alleviate tension,depression as well as mental exhaustion. These actions of peppermint essential oil are attributed to its ability to revitalize and refresh. This oil is also helpful in providing relief from nervous anxiety and restiveness. It is also known to be an effective remedy for insomnia.
  • Peppermint essential oil is rich in menthol content and, hence, is helpful in clearing the congestion in the respiratory tract. It also possesses potent expectorant properties which help it to draw out mucus and phlegm from the lungs, providing instant, albeit provisional, relief in several respiratory problems, such as cold and cough, sinusitis, nasal congestion, bronchitis and even asthma. Owing to these actions of peppermint essential oil, it is widely used in several formulations for cold rubs. Massaging or rubbing the cold rubs enclosing peppermint essential oil on the chest helps to get rid of nasal congestion as well as blockage of the respiratory tract almost instantly.
  • The essential oil extracted from the peppermint plant also possesses analgesic properties and, hence, it can be used topically to get relief from pains and aches. Peppermint essential oil encloses calcium antagonism which is believed to facilitate in providing relief from pain. This oil also has a cooling nature, which is effective in bringing down high temperatures during fever.
  • It is important to note that peppermint essential oil is highly effectual for colonoscopy, gastroscopy, and also during double-contrast barium enema (the inducement of a barium salt suspension into the rectum and colon before taking an X-ray). In such cases, peppermint essential oil is applied intraluminally (a lumen inside the space of a tubular structure, such as an artery or intestine). Presently, scientists are studying the additional benefits of the oil’s anti-spasmodic properties.
  • Peppermint essential oil is also known to augment blood circulation throughout the body.
  • It has been found that the essential oil extracted from peppermint plant possesses the property to relax the muscles. Also, relaxing the stomach muscles helps in alleviating irritable bowel syndrome. Initial findings of several types of research have proved this action of the oil, but the scientists are yet to determine the precise manner in which it works.
  • As mentioned before, peppermint essential oil contains high amounts of menthol which is beneficial for the health of the skin. Owing to the presence of menthol, using this oil topically on the skin brings forth a cooling effect. In addition, this oil nurtures dry skin and removes the problems associated with oily skin.
  • Peppermint essential oil also helps to fortify the immune system, thereby, enhancing the body’s capability to fight against diseases. In addition, this essential oil also helps to safeguard the body against several ailments.
  • Peppermint essential oil is also extremely beneficial for our hair. It brings forth a calming effect when applied on the head and facilitates getting rid of dandruff and lice. In addition, peppermint nourishes the hair follicles and makes the hair appear glistening.
  • Although researchers are still trying to ascertain the anti-cancerous properties of peppermint essential oil, it is generally believed that this oil is helpful in treating cancer. However, peppermint essential oil is said to be effective in curing tuberculosis.
  • Many herbalists recommend the use of peppermint essential oil for people suffering from urinary tract infections (UTI). Nevertheless, it needs to be mentioned that the scientists are yet to ascertain the use of peppermint essential oil for this purpose.

General properties

  • antibacterial
  • antiseptic
  • antispasmodic
  • carminative
  • stimulant
  • stomachic
  • tonic

Blends well with

  • eucalyptus
  • juniper
  • lemon
  • rosemary
  • rosewood

General uses

  • abdominal pains
  • acne
  • anorexia nervosa
  • bites
  • bruises
  • colic
  • coughing
  • mouth thrush
  • mouth ulcers
  • nausea
  • painful menstruation
  • stings
  • stress
  • swollen gums
  • toothache

Precaution

Although the essential oil extracted from peppermint possesses several therapeutic properties, it is said that this oil negates the efficacy of a number of homeopathic medications. Similar is the case for the essential oil derived from eucalyptus.

Aromatherapy Rose

ROSA GALLICA
ROSA DAMASCENA
ROSA CENTIFOLIA

The natural oil extracted from the petals of a rose is supposed to be amongst the priciest essential oils available. Rose essential oil possesses numerous therapeutic properties that help in boosting one’s physical and mental conditions. In addition, rose essential oil is known to be very co-active in blending with other natural oils. The aroma of rose essential oil is extremely long-lasting, so much so that even using a few drops of this oil will ensure that your small bottle lasts long.

Rose essential oil is obtained through a process known as solvent extraction of the freshly collected rose petals. There is little doubt why this essential oil is so expensive – approximately 5000 pounds of rose petals are required to obtain just one pound of rose oil. It is important to note that rose essential oil has high spiritual properties and has been used traditionally over centuries during different ceremonies. History testifies this aspect of the natural oil. In addition, as aforementioned, rose essential oil possesses several therapeutic properties. It is an effective remedy for sorrow, depression, unhappiness, lost love and the low periods in an individual’s life. Precisely speaking, rose essential oil has an uplifting effect on the mind and emotions.

The essential oil extracted from fresh rose petals through the solvent extraction process is highly beneficial natural oil for women. This oil not only facilitates in balancing their hormonal system but also helps in dealing with their emotional issues. Moreover, rose essential oil is a lavish ingredient in many perfumes, skin care products and massage oils as it adds the loaded fragrance of rose to these cosmetic products. Although surprising, use of rose essential oil helps to mend the wrecked capillaries, helps in treating susceptible and tender skin and is believed to be a fantastic tonic for the mature skin. Topical application of rose essential oil onto the skin makes it appear healthy and youthful.

As mentioned earlier, rose essential oil possesses numerous therapeutic properties. Some of them are mentioned briefly below and may be of use to you.

  • Rose essential oil helps to augment an individual’s self-respect, optimism, self-belief, mental strength as well as facilitates combating depression effectively. In fact, this natural oil has been found to be very effective to treat melancholy or hopelessness among people enduring depression owing to some reason or the other. In addition, rose essential oil is also useful in alleviating nervous anxiety. Since rose oil is a potent anti-depressant, it may be given to patients suffering from severe depression and going through psychoanalysis. Administering regular doses of rose essential oil will help in bringing back hope and optimism to their life. In aromatherapy, rose oil is extensively used to raise constructive thoughts, spiritualism as well as feelings of bliss, cheerfulness, and optimism.
  • Use of the essential oil distilled from the fresh petals of a rose is also effective in providing relief from respiratory tract spasms, seizures in the intestines as well as muscular contractions in the limbs. Rose essential oil also facilitates curing convulsions, cramps, muscle pulls as well as spasmodic cholera, which is said to be a result of spasms.
  • Administering rose essential oil helps to comfort and soothe patients running a high fever. In such conditions, essential oil distilled from fresh rose petals acts as a sedative that calms inflammation caused by fever. In addition to calming down patients suffering from fever, rose essential oil is also useful in other inflammatory conditions that may be caused by microbial contagions, indigestion, consuming toxic substances, dehydration, and others.
  • Rose essential oil also possesses astringent properties which are great benefit for our overall health. The astringent property of this natural oil helps to fortify the gums, hair roots, tone up as well as enliven the skin, tighten the muscles, intestines and blood vessels. These actions of rose essential oil provide protection from the premature fall of tooth and hair, untimely wrinkles, lack of firmness of the intestines and muscles in the abdominal region and the limbs that may be related to advancing age. In particular, use of rose oil also aids in stopping the flow of blood from wounds and cuts since its astringent property helps to contract the blood vessels. In addition, owing to its astringent property, rose essential oil is also effective in treating specific types of diarrhea.
  • Rose essential oil is often considered to be the utmost aromatic and possibly a magnificent manner to heal your injuries and also protect them from turning out to be septic or catching any infection.
  • Apart from possessing effective anti-viral properties, rose essential oil is also considered to be an excellent bactericide. Hence, this natural oil is widely used to treat ailments, such as cholera, diarrhea, food poisoning, typhoid and other diseases that are caused by bacterial infections. In addition, the essential oil of rose is also effective in curing internal contagions caused by bacteria as in the case of the stomach, colon, intestines and the urinary tract. At the same time, this oil is equally effective in treating external bacterial infections of the eyes, ears, skin, and wounds.
  • Use of rose essential oil helps to enhance the flow of bile from the gall bladder and, at the same time, control the intensity of acids in the stomach and bloodstream. By regulating the acid levels in the stomach and the bloodstream, rose oil helps in protecting one from conditions like acidosis and acidity. In addition, augmentation in the secretion of bile facilitates digestion of ingested foods along with the acids exuded in the stomach.
  • Besides the uses of rose oil mentioned above, it is also effective in treating a number of problems associated with females, such as tumors, uterine discharges, irregular menses, bleeding and others. In addition, rose essential oil also helps to disinfect the uterus and helps the organ to function properly even during advanced ages. Most importantly, regular use of rose essential oil by women may also help to delay the onset of menopause.
  • It is important to note that it is almost impossible to get protection from different viruses or get oneself vaccinated against all the pathogens. This is primarily owing to the fact that majority of these pathogens, especially viruses, camouflage them each time they return and result in various ailments by hoodwinking our immune system. The viruses that cause cold and influenza are ideal examples of this vicious cycle. Hence, people often wonder what measures they ought to initiate in order to avoid these microbes and keep them in the pink of health. In such cases, it is best to use an anti-viral that acts as a protection against all types of viruses that may attack our system. The rose essential oil is one such effective anti-viral that provides a safeguard against different types of viral infections.
  • Rose essential oil also possesses stomachic properties, which means that it facilitates digestion of ingested foods in the stomach. In addition, use of rose oil also helps to alleviate stomach problems, calm down stomach inflammations, helps the stomach to function properly and also protect it from various infections. Moreover, this natural oil is effective in protecting the stomach from getting ulcers that usually occur as a result of the surplus production of acids and their subsequent release into the stomach.
  • The attribute of rose essential oil to heal wounds (also known as cicatrizant property) may be of immense interest to people who are very cautious and concerned regarding their looks. In fact, the cicatrizant property of rose essential oil is effective in erasing the scars caused by wounds or marks left behind by chicken pox, acne, and boils from the skin surface. This attribute of rose oil is also helpful in removing stretch marks as well as scratches caused during surgery, fat cracks that are usually related to pregnancy and childbirth.
  • The essential oil extracted from the rose petals also functions as a tonic or stimulant for the nerves. In fact, rose oil provides them with potency to endure shocks and, at the same time, safeguards them from several disorders owing to advanced age, injuries and other aspects.
  • The essential oil of rose also sanitizes the blood by facilitating the blood to get rid of toxic substances by neutralizing some of them. When the blood is disinfected and made toxin free, people are naturally protected from botheration, such as ulcers, boils, skin diseases, rashes and other problems.
  • The hepatic property of rose essential oil helps in maintaining the proper health and functioning of the liver. In other words, use of rose oil is very helpful for the liver. Rose essential oil not only helps to keep the liver robust but also ensures that it functions properly and is shielded from all infections. In addition, the hepatic property of rose oil also helps in treating problems, such as surplus secretion of bile and acids into the stomach, ulcers in the gastrointestinal system and others.
  • Rose essential oil is especially beneficial for women, as it helps to heal and alleviate several problems specific to them. For instance, use of rose oil encourages secretion of hormones, thereby, activating proper menstruations. This oil is especially useful for women who have been enduring hindered and/ or irregular menses. At the same time, rose essential oil also helps in providing relief from cramps, cures nausea, and fatigue and also diminishes pains generally associated with menstruation’s and menopause.
  • The hemostatic property of rose essential oil or its ability to stop bleeding may often be extremely helpful for people who have been suffering from hemorrhage (internal or external bleeding) following an injury or surgery. This characteristic of the essential oil distilled from the fresh rose petals expedites blood clotting or coagulation of blood on the surface of the wound and helps to stop the hemorrhage. This is a vital property of the oil since it can save the life of patients suffering from a hemorrhage.

GENERAL PROPERTIES

  • antidepressant
  • anti-inflammatory
  • aphrodisiac
  • laxative
  • rejuvenating
  • soothing
  • uplifting

BLENDS WELL WITH

  • chamomile
  • clary sage
  • geranium
  • jasmine
  • lavender
  • patchouli
  • sandalwood
  • ylang-ylang

GENERAL USES

  • abscess
  • aging skin
  • all skin disorders
  • anorexia
  • blood cleansing
  • broken capillaries
  • bulimia
  • coldness
  • comfort
  • constipation
  • coughing
  • depression
  • eczema
  • eye complaints
  • fever
  • frigidity
  • gall bladder
  • grief
  • headache
  • impotence
  • insomnia
  • jealousy
  • liver
  • menopause
  • migraines
  • mouth ulcers
  • nausea
  • nervous disposition
  • palpitations
  • premenstrual tension
  • respiratory problems
  • shingles
  • shock
  • sore throats
  • wrinkles

PRECAUTION

The essential oil extracted from fresh rose petal is one of the most expensive oils available in the market. Since, it is scarce, usually unscrupulous traders adulterate this natural oil by mixing it with other oils. Usually, geranium oil or geraniol is used to adulterate the essential oil extracted from fresh rose petals. Hence, while buying this essential oil you ought to be extra cautious that you are not being cheated. You ought to remember that adulterated rose oil does not possess any therapeutic property that is typical in the genuine rose essential oil.

At the same time, you ought to keep in mind that rose essential oil should never be used by pregnant women since it has emmenagogic (a medication that has the ability to stimulate menstrual discharge) properties. Moreover, this natural oil should not be used by cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This oil is useful in alleviating headaches when used in gentle or diluted amounts. However, the effects can be reversed when rose essential oil is used in high concentrations for the same purpose.

Aromatherapy Sweet Orange

CITRUS SINENSIS

The sweet orange tree (botanical name Citrus sinensis) belongs to the Rutaceae family. This herb is also known by the name of Citrus aurantium var. dulcis. This is a very familiar evergreen tree having lesser spines compared to the Seville orange or the bitter orange tree. Sweet orange is a small tree, akin to a shrub, and has a grayish-brown bark and the tree is not as hardy as the Seville orange tree. The branches of this tree spread out into a somewhat regular hemisphere. The sweet orange tree bears evergreen leaves that are oval shaped and grows alternately to a length of three to four inches. On the upper side, the leaves are green and glossy, while pale in the reverse side. The flowers of this species are potently aromatic, while the sweet orange fruit is almost earth-shaped, somewhat rougher and darker compared to the common varieties of citrus. According to ancient records, the fruit was first mentioned in the writings of Arabs. Aromatic, the volatile oil is extracted from the peels of the sweet orange oil, which is also known as the Oil of Portugal.

Sweet orange essential oil is among the various citrus oils that have several therapeutic properties and, hence, is used extensively in aromatherapy. Use of this natural oil not only cures several ailments and disorders, but it also possesses the invigorating features of solar energy which infuse into our body and the nervous system. This natural oil extracted from the peel of the sweet orange fruit also enhances the clarity of the mind and emotional balance. In fact, sweet orange essential oil is especially beneficial during the harsh winter months. Use of sweet orange essential oil facilitates in sorting out as well as liberating our deep emotional concerns. Unlike many other essential oils, the oil of sweet orange is very inexpensive and one can afford to use it generously in the home. In effect, use of this oil brings in a relaxing and soothing effect on the nerves and, thereby, helps one to have a sound sleep.

The distillate of the sweet orange is obtained from a tree which is said to be native to China. However, the species has been introduced to various other regions of the world and is now cultivated commercially in the Mediterranean region, France, the North and South America and Portugal. Sweet orange essential oil is highly uplifting and its use helps to give a feeling of being alert and cheerful, while remaining relaxed. Sweet orange oil also soothes the nerves and the digestive system and alleviates stiffness from throbbing and tense muscles when a blend of this oil is massaged on the affected areas. In addition, the oil of sweet orange also helps to purify the blood, thereby, detoxifying the system and renewing the skin. This attribute of the oil helps one to maintain his or her youthful appearance.

It may be noted here that sweet orange essential oil is perhaps among the most extensively used citrus essential oils. This oil is obtained from an assortment of orange trees that are actually much smaller and less tough compared to the bitter orange tree. Sweet orange essential oil is obtained from the peel of the orange fruit by a process known as cold compression. Alternately, sweet orange essential oil may also be extracted through distillation of the fruit peels. However, sweet orange essential oil obtained by distillation is more prone to oxidation quickly compared to the oil that is extracted by the cold compression process.

Sweet orange essential oil has a variety of uses in aromatherapy. For instance, this natural oil is used to cure oily skin, constipation, bronchitis, colds, flu, insomnia and stress. Some of the therapeutic properties of sweet orange oil and the essential oil extracted from the aromatic blossoms of the bitter orange tree are common. In addition, sweet orange essential oil and orange blossom essential oil also share a number of common properties.

The essential oil obtained by cold compressing the peels of the orange fruit is known to be vivid and glowing oil that brings in pleasure and warmness to the mind, facilitating people to relax and sleep. This oil is especially beneficial for children as it helps to induce sleep among them at night. Sweet orange oil is highly effective in strengthening the immune system. At the same time, it helps to cure and combat colds and flu as well as get rid of toxic substances from the body.

Sweet orange oil possesses diuretic properties and is, therefore, helpful in balancing the water retention of the body as well as in regulating obesity. This oil has the aptitude to invigorate the lymph, which, in turn, facilitates in balancing the water processes, and detoxification of the body. In addition, sweet orange essential oil promotes the immune system and ensures the overall well-being of people who use it on a regular basis.

This essential oil is also stomich, which denotes that it is good for everything concerning the stomach. As far as the digestive system is concerned, sweet orange essential oil is effective in treating constipation and dyspepsia {indigestion}. In addition, this natural citrus oil also helps in alleviating nervousness, anxiety and stress.

In addition to the therapeutic properties of sweet orange oil and its importance in aromatherapy, this citrus oil also has numerous industrial as well as domestic utilities. Below is a brief discussion on some of the industrial and domestic uses of sweet orange essential oil that may be of use and interest to you.

  • Sweet orange essential oil is used in a variety of foods to add essence. It may be added to foodstuffs, such as chocolates, biscuits, beverages, desserts, sweets as well as bakery items or confectioneries. The industrial uses of sweet orange essential oil include its addition in the manufacture of body lotions, soaps, face creams, deodorants, room sprays or air fresheners.
  • D-limonene is an important element or chemical found in sweet orange essential oil and it is known to be a highly effective insect repellent. You may spray this oil or wipe it on places from where insects may be invading your home – for instance, cracks around the doors and windows and you will be surprised to see that your house if free from all types of insect intrusion. In addition, you may also use this essential oil in your pantry with a view to ward off moths, ants, and worms. Using sweet orange essential oil for this purpose instead of any chemical substance that is loaded with toxins, is safe.

SWEET ORANGE

In aromatherapy, sweet orange essential oil is generally used as an anti-viral oil to facilitate in avoiding the spread of viruses. It may be noted that sweet orange oil has very high vitamin C content. In addition, it also possesses sufficient antioxidants. These two features of this inexpensive citrus oil make it a product that is in high demand in the cosmetics industry. Inhaling sweet orange essential oil works as a tranquilizer and helps to sedate the nervous system, thereby, providing relief from several nervous problems. Unadulterated sweet orange essential oil is beneficial for treating infections and it also acts as a general tonic when it is inhaled or applied externally. Like in the case of many other citrus oils, sweet orange oil is used by aromatherapists to help to get rid of toxic substances from the body. In addition, unadulterated sweet orange essential oil is held in high esteem because it possesses depurative (purifying or sanitizing), diuretic and antispasmodic characteristics. In fact, this citrus essential oil obtained by cold compression of the peels of sweet orange fruit is extensively used in different formulations and blends since the aroma of this oil is highly gratifying to most people. As aforementioned, sweet orange essential oil possesses tranquilizing properties which aid in the preparation of remedies that help to induce sleep by sedating the mind. This essential oil has a calming effect in blends meant for promoting relaxation and, at the same time, this oil possesses uplifting or inspiring properties when used in creative blends.

Before winding up the topic, it may be mentioned once again that while sweet orange oil is extracted from the peel of the orange tree by the cold processing method, other “orange or citrus” essential oils are obtained from the Seville orange or bitter orange tree. For instance, petitgrain essential oil is extracted from the leaves of the bitter orange tree, while neroli essential oil is obtained by distilling the aromatic blossoms of the Seville orange tree. Similarly, bergamot essential oil is obtained by pressing the peels of the bitter orange fruits.

Sweet orange essential oil possesses a citrus-like and cheerful aroma that is extremely helpful in uplifting or inspiring the emotions as well as the mind. While this citrus oil is somewhat stimulating, in general, use of sweet orange essential oil produces a calming effect and, hence, can be used as an anti-depressant. This essential oil obtained by cold processing the peels of the sweet orange fruit is considered to possess cheering, warming, and soothing properties. These properties of this citrus oil are believed to help in balancing the nervous system as well as our emotions. In effect, in aromatherapy, it is advisable to blend the different citrus or orange essential oils to treat some conditions, especially mental tension and nervousness.

Sweet orange essential oil easily blends with several other oils creating a wonderful and effective amalgamation having a sweet citrus tone. This essential oil especially blends well with spice oils like clove. The blend of sweet orange essential oil and clove oil is very alluring and effective during the cooler months as it provides pleasant warmth to the body and the mind. In addition, this citrus oil also mixes wonderfully with other essential oils, such as lavender and frankincense. When blended with lavender, sweet orange essential oil offers a pleasant and relaxing fragrance, while its mixture with frankincense essential oil has a slight citrus tone.

Sweet orange oil is not only one of the most common essential oils but has also been used traditionally to treat and provide protection from several ailments and disorders. Traditionally, this citrus oil has been used to pacify palpitations, for skin care applying it topically in very little measures and also for treating bronchitis by using the oil in steam inhalers. Many people also promote sweet orange essential oil as a remedy for tumors, to cure inflammation as well as an anticoagulant that may help in perking up the blood circulation throughout the body. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), dried out peels of the sweet orange are used to cure colds, coughs, malignant breast sores as well as anorexia (loss of appetite and incapability to eat).

GENERAL PROPERTIES:

  • antispasmodic
  • digestive
  • immune system
  • sedative
  • stomach

BLENDS WELL WITH:

  • bergamot
  • cedarwood
  • geranium
  • ginger
  • jasmine
  • lemon
  • sandalwood
  • ylang-ylang

GENERAL USES:

  • bronchitis
  • colds
  • colic
  • constipation
  • depression
  • edema
  • fatigue
  • gingivitis
  • insomnia
  • menopause
  • motion sickness
  • mouth ulcers
  • palpitations
  • premenstrual tension
  • stress

PRECAUTION:

Sweet orange essential oil extracted by distilling the peel of the sweet orange tree should be used for therapeutic purposes with caution and only after consulting a medical professional familiar with the use of essential oils. When applying this oil topically on the skin, one should refrain from exposure to sunlight since a few varieties of this natural oil may result in making the skin photosensitive. As in the case of any other genuine essential oils, ensure that children do not have access to sweet orange essential oil and use it on their own. Often allowing children to use pure essential oils may prove to be detrimental to their health simply owing to the fact that they may become over enthusiastic and use these oils in excessive amounts. Remember, when you are using any essential oil in its pure form, the lesser used is better for health.

Both sweet orange essential oil and bitter orange essential oil contains a chemical substance known as limonene and it may result in dermatitis (skin inflammation) in some people having sensitive skin. It may be noted that in aromatherapy, the essential oil of Mandarin (botanical name Citrus reticulata) is also frequently referred to as the ‘orange oil’.

If you are using sweet orange essential oil for therapeutic purposes, never use it in high concentrations. Instead, always dilute it by adding suitable carrier oil or a lotion base before you apply the natural oil on your skin. This essential oil may result in different reactions in different people using it and in specific situations/ conditions. Hence, it needs to be reiterated that you should consult a professional and competent medical practitioner or someone who is familiar with the use of essential oils before using the sweet orange oil in aromatherapy.

Aromatherapy Jasmine Absolute

JASMINUM OFFICINALE

Jasmine has derived its name from the Old French word Jasmine that is again derived from the Persian word ‘yasmin’ literally meaning “gift from God”. This plant belongs to the genus of shrubs and vines belonging to the olive family (Oleaceae). This genus comprises approximately 200 species that are native to tropical as well as warm temperate regions of the world. Most species of this genus grow as climbers on other plants or are put on the chicken wire, trellis gates or fences in the gardens. At times, plants of this species are also made to climb through shrubs. The jasmine leaves may be of evergreen or deciduous nature. Jasmine plants are grown extensively for their aromatic flowers. The flowers are delicate and open only during the evening and are picked in the morning when the tiny petals are closed tightly. The jasmine petals usually remain open between six and eight during evenings when the temperature comes down.

Jasmine plants are vine-like and often climb up to a height of 12 feet or 3.6 meters and its flowers exude a divine aroma that conveys their presence to everyone who is nearby. The highly sweet fragrant blossoms of the species have been highly valued by various cultures across the globe for several centuries. In fact, it is said that the ancient Egyptian queen was so enticed by the scent of jasmine that she used it regularly on her hair. In Indonesia, a species of jasmine – Jasminum sambac – is the national flower, which is also widely used by the locals in wedding ceremonies. Similarly, Pakistan’s national flower is Jasmine Officinale. Jasmine flowers are also used in religious ceremonies in the Philippines, people use garlands made of jasmine (locally called ‘sampaguita’) to adorn images of Gods and Goddesses. It is also regarded as a sacred flower by the Hindus, who offer Hemapushpika (Jasmine humble) to Lord Shiva and Lord Ganesha.

jasmine-770x513The plant produces small deep green leaves that grow opposite to each other and comprise seven leaflets. Jasmine blooms are small but extremely aromatic. They usually blossom during the period between early summer and early autumn filling the atmosphere with their aromatic scent. Apart from the different uses of jasmine mentioned above, this aromatic flower also possesses therapeutic properties and, hence, the essential oil is extracted from it is widely used in aromatherapy. Jasmine essential oil is obtained from Jasminum Grandiflorum (synonym Officinale). This species is also known by other names – Jasmin, common Jasmine, and Jessamine.

The profound, sweet and flowery aroma of jasmine essential oil is attributed to the white flowers having the appearance of a star that grows robustly. Jasmine essential oil is very expensive and this can be gauged from the fact that as many as 8,000 flowers yield just one gram of the oil. Normally, the flowers are picked in the early morning, but if they are plucked during the night, they possess more potent aroma. Jasmine essential oil is obtained by steam distilling the flowers that are required in massive amounts just to produce one ounce of this valuable oil.

In fact, jasmine essential oil is said to be among the most expensive essential oils available anywhere. The numerous benefits offered by jasmine essential oil helps it to earn a place among the ‘should haves’. This essential oil is unusual, has an aesthetic effect, can easily combine with any other essential oil, is effectual for treating conditions like depressions, and also possesses aphrodisiac, sedative as well as antiseptic properties. Using only a few drops of this favorite oil has the aptitude to perform wonders when it is blended with any other essential oil.

The therapeutic properties possessed by jasmine essential oil make it an excellent remedy for skin care, particularly for the dehydrated, irritated or susceptible skin. In addition, external application of jasmine essential oil also helps in alleviating coughs, muscular spasms, hoarseness, stress or tension-related conditions and uterine problems. This oil also has various industrial uses and is extensively used in the manufacture of perfumes, cosmetics, soaps, and toiletries.

As aforementioned, besides possessing a potent, sweet, floral aroma, jasmine essential oil also has several therapeutic properties and is widely used as an antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and sedative agent. Jasmine essential oil can be easily blended with any other essential oil, including geranium essential oil, lemon balm essential oil, frankincense essential oil, bergamot essential oil, sandalwood essential oil, clary sage essential oil and rosewood essential oil. When jasmine essential oil is blended with any of the above mentioned essential oils it offers several different ways to encourage the natural manner of healing by the body.

Since very high-quality petals of the flower are required to prepare jasmine essential oil, this oil is rare to be found and always in high demand. In fact, during ancient times, the essential oil extracted from the aromatic jasmine flowers was valued highly. This was primarily owing to the fact that people considered this oil to possess aphrodisiac properties or the attribute to stimulate sexual craving. People of various cultures used jasmine essential oil in various ceremonies owing to this particular attribute of the oil. While people in China used jasmine essential oil in the hospitals and sick rooms with a view to clear the air of pollutants and make the atmosphere fragrant, the ancient Egyptians used this oil to provide relief from problems related to the nerves, headaches and also insomnia. Even to this day, the Chinese value the therapeutic properties of the herb and regularly drink an herbal tea prepared from jasmine flowers. In Indonesia, people use the aromatic jasmine flowers to add essence to their food.

The aroma of jasmine is potently sweet and floral and, hence, it is a favorite with almost everyone. The fragrance of this flower as well as the essential oil extracted from it is profound, charming, flowery and very rich. Similar to rose, genuine jasmine cannot be compared with any of the artificial fragrances that are found in abundance on the shelves of shops.

Although jasmine essential oil possesses numerous therapeutic properties, it is more popular for its aphrodisiac attributes. While not much scientific evidence is there to validate this attribute of jasmine essential oil, this does not prevent people in many parts of the world from using the oil to stimulate sexual activities as well as believe that it promotes fertility. For instance, people in Thailand sprinkle the flowers on the bed of the newly married, while aromatherapists even in the United States prescribe jasmine essential oil for treating a number of sexual disorders, including inhibition.

For several years now, jasmine essential oil has been regarded as effectual natural oil especially meant for women. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TMC) as well as the ancient Indian medical practice is known as Ayurveda, this oil is used extensively for various purposes. Since jasmine essential oil is known to be effective in balancing the hormones in one’s system, it can be used as massage oil. Especially, massaging jasmine essential oil on the abdomen during childbirth helps to ease the pains related to labor.

Besides the properties discussed above, jasmine essential oil is also considered to be a natural antidepressant. Aroma- therapists are of the view that this oil is especially useful for people enduring symptoms of lethargy and exhaustion. They are of the opinion that jasmine essential oil functions partially to reduce apprehension and also open up new emotional pathways.

Among the various essential oils, jasmine essential oil is one of the best natural oils that is very subtle, rich and having a beautiful flowery fragrance. These attributes of the oil make it an important and precious element for several cosmetic products. In fact, jasmine essential oil is among the oldest known natural oils that have widespread use in botanical fragrances. During the Middle Ages, this aromatic flower was primarily cultivated in China, northern regions of India and also in North Africa. Jasmine essential oil was first introduced in Europe during the 17th century.

As mentioned earlier, the word ‘Jasmine’ has its origin in the Persian language. Even people in ancient Asia used the branches of jasmine plants bearing beautiful white flowers during their several rituals and ceremonies. In the early days, jasmine blossoms were used in China, Egypt, Morocco and the Osman Empire to prepare aromatic tea, while the jasmine essential oil was basically cherished for its outstanding aphrodisiac attributes. In addition, jasmine essential oil is particularly useful for women since it provides relief from menstrual pains and cramps as well as helps to maintain the hormonal balance.

It may be mentioned here that jasmine essential oil is known to offer several emotional and physical benefits. In aromatherapy, jasmine essential oil is said to be a potent tranquilizer as well as a relaxant that induces warmth and promotes sound sleep. This oil is especially useful for those suffering from nervous anxiety, depression and insomnia. Jasmine essential oil is among the most common natural oils that are used for meditation. This oil not only encourages the feeling of harmony and hopefulness, but its use also brings joy, contentment, cheerfulness and other similar feelings. Jasmine essential oil also possesses inspiring as well as antidepressant properties and is, therefore, very helpful for people suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome, low spirit, mood swings or changing moods and similar conditions.

Jasmine essential oil is regarded as base natural oil that combines easily and extremely well with other essential oils. In fact, the attitude of jasmine essential oil to support any synergistic combination makes it extremely rare as well as unique in aromatherapy. In fact, jasmine essential oil especially blends well with sandalwood essential oil, sweet orange essential oil and vetiver essential oil.

In the present day aromatherapy, jasmine essential oil is highly expensive, but it is worth the money spent for skin care. When applied on the skin, jasmine essential oil stimulates cellular growth as well as enhances the elasticity or suppleness of the skin. Herbalists frequently prescribe jasmine essential oil for treating minor to moderate burns cases. In addition, massaging jasmine essential oil also alleviates sprains and muscle spasms.

GENERAL PROPERTIES

  • antidepressant
  • aphrodisiac
  • soothing
  • uplifting

BLENDS WELL WITH

Any essential oil but especially with:

  • bergamot
  • clary sage
  • geranium
  • rose
  • sandalwood
  • ylang-ylang

GENERAL USES

  • anorexia and bulimia
  • apathy
  • childbirth
  • depression
  • dry sensitive skin
  • frigidity
  • impotence
  • increases breast milk
  • lack of confidence
  • menopause
  • oversensitivity

PRECAUTION

Notwithstanding its therapeutic properties, one must always remember that the essential oil extracted from jasmine flowers should never be used internally or consumed. In addition, pregnant women should not use it in the initial four months of pregnancy. However, massaging this oil during childbirth helps to ease pains during labor.