A Miracle Herb for Face, Skin and Hair; Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera Gel and Aloe Vera Juice are extracted from the leaves of the Aloe Vera plant, a botanical that the ancient Egyptians often referred to as “The Plant of Immortality” or “The Plant of Eternity.” It was believed that the “blood” of the Aloe Vera plant would not only address symptoms of fevers, soothe burns and wounds, and enhance daily cosmetic applications, but that it would also magnify beauty and promote imperishability. Known for having anti-bacterial properties, the contents of the Aloe Vera plant were used in embalming rituals, as it was believed that the deceased could achieve everlasting life, both physically and spiritually, if their bodies could be prevented from decomposing.

Even before the Egyptians, the benefits of the Aloe Vera plant’s gel and juice were recognized by the Mesopotamians, who used it for the internal cleansing of their intestines. In this society, physical ailments were believed to be demonic possessions, and it was believed that a “divine” plant, namely the Aloe Vera plant, could eliminate the body’s “demons.” Inscriptions about this healthful plant from this time were written on clay boards and are considered to be the earliest documentation of Aloe Vera.

Although indigenous to Africa, the Aloe Vera plant has been cultivated worldwide, specifically in tropical and subtropical regions. Throughout history, it has been used as a staple in the traditional medicinal preparations of various communities, including Chinese, Middle Eastern, and Indian. In these and other societies, Aloe Vera Gel and Juice have been taken orally and applied topically to calm inflammation, to support and act as a tonic for digestive health, to heal wounds and prevent scarring, to ease pain, to enhance the overall health of skin and hair, and to address particular health concerns.

In the 16th century, Native American tribes regarded the Aloe plant as one of their many “holy” and “god-like” botanicals, which they worshipped and called “The Burn/Medicine/and Mystery Plant.” Within these communities, Aloe Juice was often diluted and applied to the skin as an insect repellant, which helped protect the tribes from insect-infested swamps through which they often had to march. This insect repellant application was also used as a preservative for materials, such as wood, that was susceptible to damage caused by pests.

Now sometimes referred to as “a pharmacy in a plant,” Aloe Vera Gel and Juice continue to be used to address pain, burns, symptoms of diabetes, high cholesterol, and arthritis, among other health conditions and complaints. It is a valued ingredient in cosmetics, such as moisturizers, masks, toners, hair products, and aftershave products. It is also commonly found in ointments for sunburns as well as dietary supplements and drinks.

An Aloe leaf consists of two parts: the gel and the juice.

The gel is the clear, odorless, mucilaginous, innermost portion of the leaf, and it is the most prevalent form and use of the Aloe plant. It is largely composed of water but also contains vitamins, a protein consisting of several amino acids, and organic and inorganic compounds.

The juice, also known as “Aloe Latex,” is the yellow, strong-smelling, bitter-tasting sap that is found between the leaf’s green inner skin and the gel. This is the liquid that drips from the Aloe leaf when it is cut.

Although the gel and the liquid share similar benefits and can both be used directly and safely on the skin, they are not identical and have distinct properties, thus the terms Aloe Gel and Aloe Juice are not used interchangeably in this article. NDA carries Aloe Vera Gel Juice, which is obtained by stripping away the outer leaf rind, rinsing away the Aloe Latex, and then de-pulping the inner fillets.

I will show you the various benefits and safe uses of NDA’s Aloe Vera Gel Juice, the consistency of which is more like that of a juice (although it should not be mistaken for the drinkable Aloe Vera Juice).

The benefits of Aloe Vera Gel Juice are wide-ranging, earning itself the reputation of being able to address various discomforts, including those associated with allergies, acne, abrasions, asthma, sores, blisters, bruises, burns, blood pressure, constipation, coughs, colds, colic, dry and chapped skin, hair loss, rashes, inflammation, fungal infections, headaches, indigestion, insect bites and stings, jaundice, joint pain, cramps, moles, nausea, razor burn, stretch marks, shingles, sciatic nerve, tendonitis, ulcers,  varicose veins, windburn, various types of wounds, and warts, to name only a few conditions for which it is believed to offer relief.

Used cosmetically, Aloe Vera Gel Juice can hydrate, exfoliate, nourish, clarify, and revitalize the skin and hair. Its antioxidant activity and richness in vitamins help it to repair skin and hair damage and to protect them before and after the harmful effects of UV radiation. Its smoothing quality helps to prevent and diminish the appearance of wrinkles, making it ideal for “anti-aging” formulations as well as formulations for acne, psoriasis, and dermatitis. It moisturizes without leaving skin or hair with a greasy residue, which makes it beneficial for oily skin and hair types. Aloe Vera is believed to help fade tans and stretch marks.

The natural emollience and anti-irritant property of Aloe Vera Gel Juice make it ideal for use in formulations for cosmetics such as creams, lotions, makeup, soaps, sunscreens, shaving cream, shampoos, and even tissues and incense. When used in beauty applications, it can make a suitable moisturizer as well as a makeup primer for use before the application of foundation, and it can effectively function as a makeup remover.

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Used in massage applications, Aloe Vera Gel Juice is reputed to soothe muscular aches, joint pain, inflammation, wounds, burns, frostbite, and infections. It is also believed to stimulate skin regeneration, thereby improving the look of skin afflicted with dryness, flaking, and other uncomfortable topical conditions, whether it is on the body or the scalp. As a source of protein, it is believed to enhance energy as well as promote the development of muscles.

Used medicinally, Aloe Vera Gel Juice works to eliminate bodily toxins, increase the body’s antioxidant activity, balance digestive fluid, and enhance the body’s ability to absorb nutrients, thus supporting the health and function of the immune system. Its anti-inflammatory function helps the body repair damage to the skin and tissues, making it ideal for not only soothing wounds and burns but also for easing the discomfort of joint pain. It is also believed to be effective for addressing stubborn conditions such as skin ulcers and dandruff.

Aloe Vera Gel Juice is reputed to have many therapeutic properties. The following highlights its many benefits and the kinds of activity it is believed to show:

  • COSMETIC: Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant, Smoothing, Protective, Nourishing Clarifying, Soothing, Hydrating
  • MEDICINAL: Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant, Soothing, Protective, Nourishing, Anti-Viral, Wound-Healing

ALOE VERA GEL JUICE USES

Used in cosmetic and topical applications, Aloe Vera Gel Juice is often used to help soothe and facilitate the healing of sunburned skin with its protective, hydrating, and restorative qualities. To make a hydrating ointment that is reputed to have these therapeutic effects on sunburned skin, begin by thoroughly combining 2 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel Juice, 2 Tbsp. of Coconut Carrier Oil, and 3 drop Lavender Essential Oil either by blending them together in a food processor or by whipping them together with a fork. To use this blend, apply it gently to affected areas of skin and allow it to remain on the skin for as long as possible. This salve can be reapplied 2-3 times a day until significant improvements are noticeable. The remainder of this blend can be stored in an airtight container and kept in the refrigerator. If the mixture hardens before the next topical application, simply stir the ingredients together again.

For a fast-absorbing moisturizer, that hydrates without leaving a greasy residue on the skin and has a smoothing effect on the look of fine lines, begin by pouring the following ingredients into an amber dropper bottle with the help of a small funnel: 4 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel Juice, 1 tsp. Vegetable Glycerin, ½ tsp. Argan Carrier Oil, and ¼ tsp. Watermelon Seed Carrier Oil. Next, add 4 drops Tea Tree Essential Oil and 4 drops Lavender Essential Oil. Cap the bottle, then shake it well to thoroughly combine all the ingredients. To use this facial serum, first, cleanse the face and pat it dry. Place 3 drops of the blend onto the palm and rub the palms together before applying it to the face like a typical moisturizer. This thin, light blend is ideal for those with oily skin and can be used before makeup application as well as after shaving.

For an anti-microbial, balancing, an overnight facial serum that is reputed to soothe and promote the skin’s regeneration and the faster healing of acne, begin by diluting 3 drops of Tea Tree Essential Oil in 3 tsp. Aloe Vera Gel Juice. After thoroughly mixing the two ingredients together, simply apply this blend to the affected areas of the face and leave it on like an overnight face mask. In the morning, rinse off the mask. This nightly regimen is believed to have a skin-regenerative effect and can be applied each night until the appearance of pimples and/or scarring is visibly diminished. It is also ideal for addressing irritation, inflammation, and blisters.

For a hydrating face mask that is reputed to promote skin’s elasticity, smoothness, and firmness, begin by combining equal amounts of Aloe Vera Gel Juice, Glycerol, Water, and Ground Oat Flakes in a bowl. Mix the ingredients together until the blend achieves the consistency of a paste. Next, apply this blend to the face in a thin layer to make a mask. After leaving the mask on for 5 minutes, rinse it off with cool water. This application is believed to promote the skin’s rejuvenation for a younger-looking complexion.

To decrease the appearance of stretch marks, begin by whisking together ½ Virgin Coconut Carrier Oil and 1/3 cup Aloe Vera Gel Juice, then transfer the blend to an air-tight container. To use this mixture, massage a small amount into the areas of skin affected by stretch marks and allow it to penetrate into the skin overnight. This moisturizer can be applied to the affected areas nightly before going to bed. Results are reputed to be visible after following this regimen every night for 3-4 weeks.

For a natural makeup remover blend that is gentle enough to apply to the sensitive eye area, begin by pouring ½ cup of Aloe Vera Gel Juice, 1 cup filtered water, and ¼ cup Organic Extra Virgin Olive Carrier Oil into a blender and thoroughly blending all the ingredients together. Strain the resultant blend with a sieve, then transfer the filtered blend to a clean bottle that will make it easy to dispense the cleanser onto a cotton pad. As the mixture settles inside the bottle, it is normal for the oil to float to the top. To use this cleanser, shake it well to incorporate the floating oil, then pour a small amount onto a clean cotton pad and swipe it across the entire face. Areas of skin with more tenacious makeup, such as waterproof mascara, may require extra swipes of the saturated pad.

For an exfoliating facial scrub that is reputed to promote smoother skin as well as enhance skin’s natural radiance, thoroughly combine 1 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel Juice, ¼ cup Brown Sugar, and 1 Tbsp. Extra-Virgin Olive Carrier Oil. Apply this blend to the face and the body, gently rubbing it in small circles to promote the skin’s exfoliation. Rinse the scrub off with warm water followed by cool water and pat the skin dry.

For a soothing, cleansing face mask that also hydrates and balances the skin’s oil production, begin by pouring 1 Tbsp. Sugar into ½ Tbsp. Milk until the Sugar liquifies. To this, add 2 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel Juice and thoroughly combine all ingredients with a spoon. Scoop this blend onto the fingertips and apply it to the face in a thin layer to create a mask. Leave the mask on for 20 minutes before rinsing it off with warm water. This regimen can be repeated daily.

For a strengthening hairspray that is reputed to contribute shine to the strands while working to eliminate frizz, begin by combining 1 cup warm water, 1 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel Juice and 5 drops Lavender Essential Oil in a small mixing bowl. Transfer this blend to a clean spray bottle. To use this mist, simply shake it well and spray it onto the scalp and strands. If hair is damp, the spray can be spritzed on generously. If the hair is dry, a light spritz is recommended. This conditioning spray is believed to soothe and prevent dandruff, itchiness, and inflammation as well as balance the scalp’s pH level, repair damage, and encourage the growth of longer and stronger hair.

For a hair treatment mask that can be applied before shampooing, begin by thoroughly combining the following ingredients in a small mixing bowl: ½ cup Aloe Vera Gel Juice and 2 Tbsp. a Carrier Oil of personal preference. To apply this mask, section the hair and smooth the blend onto each section. Allow the mask to penetrate the hair and scalp for 20 minutes, then shampoo and condition the hair as usual.

For a softening leave-in conditioner that eliminates knots and tangles and promotes stronger hair growth, combine the following ingredients in a clean, empty shampoo bottle: 2 Tbsp. the leave-in conditioner of personal preference, 2 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel Juice, 2 tsp. Castor Carrier Oil, and 2 Tsp. Jojoba Carrier Oil. Cap the bottle and shake it well to thoroughly combine all the ingredients. To use this blend, apply it like a regular leave-in conditioner, then store the remainder in the refrigerator.

Aloe Vera Gel Juice is believed to make an ideal shaving gel and can be applied to all the usual places that require hair removal, although it is recommended to avoid sensitive areas. Used after a shave, it is known to offer soothing relief.

To hydrate dry and cracked heels, create a moisturizing overnight foot mask by combining ½ cup Oatmeal, ¼ cup Aloe Vera Gel Juice, and ½ cup a preferred body lotion. Apply this blend to the feet. To enhance the hydrating property of this mixture, keep the feet covered with socks.

For a nourishing treatment that is reputed to diminish the signs of aging on the hands, simply combine 1 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel Juice and 1 tsp. Coconut Carrier Oil in a clean bottle. To use this conditioning moisturizer, pour the required amount of the oil blend onto the palms to gently warm it up before massaging it into the hands like a regular moisturizer. Next, rinse the oil off with warm water and pat the hands dry.

Used in medicinal applications, Aloe Vera Gel Juice soothes and cools the skin, helps boost immunity, and protects the body against harmful bacteria that could potentially lead to infections. For a simple application that soothes insect stings and bites and that calms minor burns and inflammation, begin by pouring Aloe Vera Gel Juice into an ice cube tray. After the frozen cubes have formed, simply rub one cube in small circles on the area affected by swelling.

To make a natural, non-drying, Aloe-based hand sanitizer, begin by combining the following ingredients in a clean spray bottle: ½ cup Aloe Vera Gel Juice and ¼ cup Alcohol. To add a pleasant scent, simply add 3 drops of an essential oil of personal preference. Cap the bottle and shake it well to thoroughly combine all the components. To use this cleansing and disinfecting blend, spray it onto the palms and massage the cleanser into the hands like a regular sterilizing gel.

A GUIDE TO ALOE VERA GEL JUICE VARIETIES & THEIR BENEFITS

ALOE VERA GEL JUICE (DECOLORIZED) RAW MATERIAL

INCI: Aloe Vera Gel Juice (and) Citric Acid (and) Sodium Benzoate (and) Potassium Sorbate

Country of Origin: Canada

Believed to:

  • Be a thin liquid designed for application in manufacturing processes
  • Be ideal for use in formulations for soaps, creams, lotions, and other cosmetics
  • Be safe for direct application to the skin but should not be confused with a gel
  • Spoil and become contaminated with microorganisms, if not properly stored and used in combination with a preservative system
  • Contain Vitamin B complex, Folic Acid, Vitamin C, and Carotene
  • Be a well-respected moisturizing agent

CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR ALOE VERA GEL JUICE

Aloe Vera Gel Juice is for external use only. It is imperative to consult a medical practitioner before using this raw material for therapeutic purposes. Pregnant and nursing women are especially advised not to use Aloe Vera Gel Juice without the medical advice of a physician, as it may have an effect on certain hormone secretions and it is unclear whether these effects are transferable to babies at these stages of development. It should always be stored in an area that is inaccessible to children, especially those under the age of 7.

Those with the following health conditions are recommended to be advised by a physician: diabetes, intestinal conditions (e.g. Crohn’s Disease), hemorrhoids, kidney problems, cancer, heart-related ailments, skin disorders, or hormone-related ailments. Individuals that are taking prescription drugs, undergoing major surgery, or who are at a greater risk of experiencing strokes, heart attacks, or atherosclerosis are also advised to seek medical consultation prior to use. Those with allergies to Garlic, Onions, or Tulips should avoid the use of Aloe Vera Gel Juice.

Prior to using Aloe Vera Gel Juice, a skin test is recommended. This can be done by diluting 1 drop in 4 drops of a Carrier Oil and applying a dime-size amount of this blend to a small area of skin that is not sensitive. Aloe Vera Gel Juice must never be used near the inner nose, ears, or on any other particularly sensitive areas of skin.

Potential side effects of Aloe Vera Gel Juice include hives, irritation, inflammation, burning, redness (possible redness of the eyelids), the drying, hardening, and splitting of skin, purple spots, rashes, and swelling. Aloe Vera Gel Juice may also slow down the healing of surgical wounds.

Those seeking medical care to manage moods, behaviors, or disorders should treat this product as a complementary remedy rather than a replacement for any medicinal treatments or prescriptions. In the event of an allergic reaction, discontinue use of the product and see a doctor, pharmacist, or allergist immediately for a health assessment and appropriate remedial action. To prevent side effects, consult with a medical professional prior to use.

Because Aloe Vera Gel Juice is a water-based product, if it is not used in conjunction with a preservative system, it could naturally become contaminated with bacteria, resulting in a toxic and thus unusable product. For this reason, it is important to ensure its proper storage away from heat, direct sunlight, and other factors that could cause it to become rancid faster.

IN ESSENCE…

    • Aloe Vera Gel and Aloe Vera Juice are extracted from the leaves of the Aloe Vera plant.
    • An Aloe Vera leaf consists of two parts: the gel and the juice. Although the gel and the liquid share similar benefits and can both be used directly and safely on the skin, they are not identical substances and have distinct properties.
    • Used cosmetically, Aloe Vera Gel Juice can hydrate, exfoliate, nourish, clarify, and revitalize the skin and hair. It helps protect the skin and hair before and after the harmful effects of UV radiation, and it works to repair the damage. It also helps to prevent and diminish the appearance of wrinkles, acne, psoriasis, and dermatitis. It moisturizes without leaving skin and hair with a greasy residue and it helps fade tans and stretch marks.
    • Used in massage applications, Aloe Vera Gel Juice is reputed to soothe muscular aches, joint pain, inflammation, wounds, burns, frostbite, and infections. It is also believed to stimulate skin regeneration, enhance energy, and promote the development of muscles.
  • Used medicinally, Aloe Vera Gel Juice works to eliminate bodily toxins, increase the body’s antioxidant activity, balance digestive fluid, and enhance the body’s ability to absorb nutrients, thus supporting the health and function of the immune system. It helps the body repair damage to the skin and tissues and eases other physical discomforts, such as the symptoms of arthritis.

A Powerful Antioxidant; Vitamin E

Liquid Vitamin E – sometimes referred to as “The Skin Vitamin” – is an antioxidant as well as a nutrient that is vital for maintaining the well-being of skin and hair. Foods such as vegetable oils, legumes, seafood, eggs, raw nuts and seeds, some fruits, cereals, wheat germ, leafy green vegetables, meat, and poultry abound in Vitamin E content, which is known to support the health and function of various body systems. As the main fat-soluble antioxidant in the human body, Vitamin E is best known for providing skin with nutrition and for strengthening immunity.

Vitamin E is reputed to eliminate the body’s free radicals, which are responsible for causing premature aging as well as damage to the cells, among other conditions and complaints. It has been especially lauded for its ability to address scars, burns, and wounds, hence the reason it has been used as an antioxidant in skincare, especially in “anti-aging products,” for more than fifty years. Different from Vitamin E supplements, which are taken orally to address heart health, eye health, inflammation, and general immune function, Vitamin E-Liquid is used on the skin after being added to moisturizers, such as creams, lotions, and ointments. When added to natural product formulations, Vitamin E also works as a stabilizer and has the potential to extend a product’s shelf life.

Vitamin E is often believed to refer to one specific vitamin; however, on the contrary, it encompasses a group of other antioxidant vitamins that are fat-soluble, and its numerous natural forms are referred to as Tocopherols, which is the only form that is known to satisfy human health needs. Vitamin E occurs in chemical forms as well, such as alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and Delta- Tocopherol and as alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta- Tocotrienol, but most Vitamin E-Liquid/Oil does not consist of all these forms.

Many carrier oils – including Almond, Apricot Kernel, Babassu, Canola, Corn, Flaxseed, Grapeseed, Hazelnut, Olive, Oat, Palm, Poppyseed, Rice Bran, Safflower, Soybean, Sunflower, and Wheat Germ – are also natural sources of a high Vitamin E content, making them suitable for use as Liquid Vitamin E substitute.

Used cosmetically or topically in general, Vitamin E-Liquid can be used to nourish and promote the growth of new skin and hair. With moisturizing properties, it is known to soothe and prevent skin that is dry and afflicted with itching, flaking, and burning. By keeping the skin hydrated, it is believed to help slow the look of wrinkles and thereby promote a youthful, radiant complexion. Its hydrating effect is also known to diminish the appearance of sagging or creping skin.

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Used in massages, Vitamin E is believed to be applicable for boosting energy and stamina, strengthening muscles, and promoting the repair of muscles that have been damaged by exercise. Using Vitamin E to moisturize areas of skin that are affected by wounds or sunburns may potentially benefit the skin by facilitating healing and possibly reducing the appearance of scars.

Used medicinally, Vitamin E-Liquid is reputed to be ideal for use by those who prefer not to apply harsh prescription medications to address skin conditions characterized by itchiness, inflammation, blisters, and scaly patches of skin, such as dermatitis, mild psoriasis, and eczema. When added to moisturizers, it is believed to increase their hydrating efficacy while easing the aforementioned symptoms.

Liquid Vitamin E is reputed to have many therapeutic properties. The following highlights its many benefits and the kinds of activity it is believed to show:

  • COSMETIC: Antioxidant, Brightening, Smoothing, Regenerative, Reparative, Soothing, Skin-Strengthening, Stimulating, Moisturizing, Circulatory, Anti-Bacterial, Nourishing
  • MEDICINAL: Cicatrizant, Regenerative, Reparative, Soothing, Skin-Strengthening, Stimulating, Circulatory, Anti-Inflammatory, Analgesic, Immune-Enhancing, Anti-Bacterial, Nourishing, Wound-Healing

LIQUID VITAMIN E USES

Used in cosmetic and topical applications, Liquid Vitamin E’s oil-soluble thickness makes it ideal for use at night before bed, as the skin tends to gradually become drier overnight. It is also a better idea to use it overnight because during the day it can cause the complexion to become shiny and make it difficult to apply makeup. Restorative and revitalizing, Liquid Vitamin E makes an ideal substitute for a regular night cream. For a rejuvenating moisturizer blend, simply add 3 drops of Vitamin E-Liquid to a preferred nighttime face cream or lotion and apply it to the preferred areas of skin to strengthen skin and prevent it from becoming dull, loose, and wrinkled.

Alternatively, an all-natural moisturizer can be made by diluting Vitamin E Liquid in Olive Carrier Oil. This blend is also known to improve the skin’s collagen production to maintain its resilience. Applying this blend as an overnight under-eye moisturizer prevents this area from thinning and from forming dark circles.

It is believed that a mixture of Vitamin E and Vitamin C has a natural sun-protective quality that prevents the body from the effects of environmental pollutants as well as from free radicals, which damage and mutate the cells, thereby causing the look of premature aging characterized by the wrinkled skin. By calming inflammation and contributing moisture to the dry and sensitive skin, this vitamin combination helps preserve the look of a rejuvenated complexion. For a night serum that is reputed to brighten the complexion, balance the skin tone, support collagen production and function, and address the effects of photoaging, begin by whisking the following ingredients together in a bowl: 1 tsp. GMO-free Vitamin C Powder and 1 tsp. filtered water. To this, add 1½ Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel. Again, whisk all the ingredients together. Next, pour in ⅛ tsp. Vitamin E Liquid and 5 drops Frankincense Essential Oil and thoroughly combine all the ingredients. With the help of a funnel, pour the resultant blend into a small, darkly-colored bottle. To use this serum, apply it to the face at night before bed and rinse it off in the morning. Avoid using it in the sun, as it could potentially cause photosensitivity. It is suggested that this serum only is used on alternate nights in order to monitor the skin’s response to the new product. Results are reputed to be visible after a few weeks or around the 3-month mark.

A Vitamin E Liquid-enriched shampoo is reputed to reduce hair loss, promote luster, and make it easier to comb the hair. For hair that feels silkier and smoother and that is free of knots, add 3 drops of Vitamin E-Liquid to a regularly-used shampoo. This simple solution is believed to increase circulation to the scalp, which improves the strength of the hair and overall hair health. Its hydrating property addresses dryness and works to prevent dandruff, and its nourishing quality repairs strands that have become damaged and brittle from excessive use of heat styling tools.

For a hair mask with similar effects, begin by combining 4 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel, 2 Tbsp. Argan Carrier Oil, and 2 Tsp. Vitamin E Liquid. Apply this mask to the scalp and smooth it down over the strands, allowing it to soak in for 30 minutes before washing it out. This regimen can be repeated once or twice weekly to hydrate, repair, strengthen, and nourish hair.

To make a conditioning hot oil hair treatment that is reputed to preserve the health of hair that may regularly be subjected to the damaging effects of coloring treatments or heat styling, begin by creating a mixture of the following ingredients: 90 ml (3 oz.) Olive Carrier Oil, 90 ml (3 oz.) Coconut Carrier Oil, 90 ml (3 oz.) Hemp Seed Carrier Oil, and 90 ml (3 oz.) Jojoba Carrier Oil. To this blend, add 60 ml (2 oz.) Vitamin E Liquid. To use this oil blend, gently heat and apply it to the scalp and hair like a typical hair mask for smoother, stronger strands.

For a natural, pre-shower body oil that is reputed to remove dead and dull skin, promote the skin’s regeneration, and enhance its natural radiance, begin by thoroughly combining 2 tsp. Vitamin E Liquid, 2 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel, and 2 Tbsp. Rose Water in a small mixing bowl. This blend can be applied to the entire body in a thin layer and left on for 20 minutes before being washed off. To restore the skin’s moisture and revitalize its appearance and texture, this regimen can be followed twice a week.

To reduce the appearance of stretch marks and scars or to potentially prevent them from occurring, combine 1 tsp. Vitamin E Liquid and 2 Tbsp. Argan Carrier Oil. Massage this blend into the skin nightly for a few minutes, focusing especially on areas that are likely to develop stretch marks, such as the belly, hips, posterior, and thighs. This can also be applied after a bath or shower while the skin is still slightly damp. Due to the skin’s increased rate of absorption at this time, the oil is believed not to leave a greasy residue. Used regularly, this regimen is reputed to promote smoother and clearer skin.

For a natural makeup remover that purifies while balancing the skin’s natural oils, begin by combining 30 ml (1 oz.) Vitamin E Liquid, 30 ml (1 oz.) Jojoba Carrier Oil, and 60 ml (2 oz.) Witch Hazel Distillate inside a clean bottle with a pump dispenser. Cap and shake the bottle well to thoroughly combine all the ingredients. To use this facial cleanser blend, simply pump a few drops onto a clean cotton pad and firmly swipe the pad across the skin to get rid of impurities and makeup, including mascara.

Used in medicinal applications, Liquid Vitamin E soothes and repairs skin to facilitate healing. For a bath blend that is reputed to ease the symptoms of damaging and uncomfortable skin conditions, such as psoriasis, dilute 1-2 tsp. Vitamin E Liquid in a warm bath. This is believed to contribute smoothness to rough, dry skin and to have a healing effect on injuries and abrasions, such as scrapes, cuts, redness, irritation, bumps, sunburn, and other topical distresses.

For a detoxifying and relaxing bath blend, begin by thoroughly combining the following ingredients in a food processor: 10 g (0.35 oz.) loose leaf Green Tea, 1 ¾ cup Epsom Salt, 2/3 cup Baking Soda, 1 ½ Tbsp. Vitamin E Liquid, 15 drops of Eucalyptus Essential Oil, and 10 drops Lavender Essential Oil. Next, transfer this mixture to a jar or a plastic food storage bag. Add ½ cup of this bath blend along with 1 Tbsp. Coconut Carrier Oil to a warm bath and soak for 30 minutes. When this blend is not in use, it can be stored in a cool and dry area.

To gently soothe sunburned skin, begin by diluting 2 Tsp. Vitamin E Liquid in 2 Tbsp. Aloe Vera Gel. Next, using the fingers, lightly smooth this blend onto the area of skin affected by overexposure to UV radiation. Leave this salve on until it dries or becomes sticky on the skin, at which time it can be rinsed off with cold water. Softly pat the skin dry. This preparation can be applied daily, or even several times daily, until the affected area of skin shows signs of improvement.

A GUIDE TO LIQUID VITAMIN E VARIETIES & THEIR BENEFITS

VITAMIN E (MT-50 FULL SPECTRUM) RAW MATERIAL

INCI: Tocopherol

Country of Origin: China

Believed to:

  • Range in color from golden Yellow to a reddish shade
  • Be a viscous oil with an aroma characteristic of vegetable oil
  • Oxidize upon exposure to air and light, resulting in the gradual darkening of its color
  • Potentially tint skincare formulations
  • Be GMO-free and Gluten-free
  • Protect the skin from environmental elements
  • Contain d-alpha-Tocopherol, which helps reduce the appearance of fine lines
  • Be a natural antioxidant with a full spectrum of Tocopherols
  • Be ideal for use in cosmetics, particularly for extending the shelf-life of oils (any product with water in it will require a full-spectrum preservative).
  • Extend the life of a carrier oil when used at 0.5%
  • Benefit the skin when used at a minimum of 2% and a maximum of 30% in a formulation
  • Be comprised of the following constituents: 50% Vitamin E (d-alpha-Tocopherol, d-beta-Tocopherol, d-gamma-Tocopherol, d-delta-Tocopherol) and 50% (GMO-free) Refined Soybean Oil
  • Be soluble in ethanol, ether, acetone, fats, and vegetable oils
  • Be insoluble in water
  • Be designed specifically as an ingredient to be used in cosmetics, thus this particular form of Vitamin E should not be applied directly to the skin
  • Be best preserved in a tightly-closed bottle and kept in a cool, dark, dry, and well-ventilated area

 

VITAMIN E (USP COSMETIC GRADE) RAW MATERIAL

INCI: d-alpha-Tocopherol

Country of Origin: China

Believed to:

  • Be a viscous liquid that ranges in color from golden Yellow to clear Brown
  • Oxidize upon exposure to air and light, resulting in the gradual darkening of its color
  • Have the potential to add a tint of color to skin care formulations
  • Be GMO-free and Gluten-free
  • Play a crucial role in protecting the skin from environmental elements
  • Help reduce the appearance of fine lines
  • Extend the shelf life of oils (any product with water in it will require a full-spectrum preservative) when used at 0.5%
  • Benefit the skin when added to a formulation at a minimum of 2% and a maximum of 30%
  • Be designed specifically as an ingredient to be used in cosmetics, thus this particular form of Vitamin E should not be applied directly to the skin
  • Be comprised of the following constituents: 67%-87% d-alpha-Tocopherol and 13%-33% Refined GMO-free Soybean Oil
  • Be soluble in alcohol and oils
  • Be insoluble in water
  • Darken when exposed to high temperatures
  • Degrade when exposed to alkali
  • Be best preserved in a tightly-closed bottle and kept in a cool, dark, dry, and well-ventilated area

CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR LIQUID VITAMIN E

Vitamin E Liquid is for external use only. It is imperative to consult a medical practitioner before using this oil for therapeutic purposes. Pregnant and nursing women are especially advised not to use Liquid Vitamin E without the medical advice of a physician, as it may have an effect on certain hormone secretions and it is unclear whether these effects are transferable to babies at these stages of development. The oil should always be stored in an area that is inaccessible to children, especially those under the age of 7.

Those with the following health or skin conditions are recommended to be advised by a physician: acne, bleeding disorders, liver or kidney problems, high blood fats, Retinitis pigmentosa, Vitamin K deficiency, cancer, diabetes, heart-related ailments, skin disorders, or hormone-related ailments. Individuals that are taking prescription drugs, undergoing or recovering from major surgery, or who are at a greater risk of experiencing strokes, heart attacks, or atherosclerosis are also advised to seek medical consultation prior to use.

Before using Vitamin E-Liquid, a skin test is recommended. This can be done by diluting 1 drop of the liquid in 4 drops of a Carrier Oil and applying a dime-size amount of this blend to a small area of skin that is not sensitive. Liquid Vitamin E must never be used near the inner nose, ears, or on any other particularly sensitive areas of skin. Potential side effects of Liquid Vitamin E include bruising, bleeding, blurred vision, contact dermatitis, diarrhea, fatigue, headache, nausea, rash, skin irritation, stomach cramps, and weakness. When used in high doses, Vitamin E Liquid could potentially cause Hypervitaminosis E, which is characterized by numerous symptoms that can vary from skin blotches to bone pain.

Those seeking medical care to manage moods, behaviors, or disorders should treat this product as a complementary remedy rather than a replacement for any medicinal treatments or prescriptions. Those who use the following should inform their physicians before use of this product: mineral oil, iron supplements, blood thinners, or bile acid-binding resins.

In the event of an allergic reaction, discontinue use of the product and see a doctor, pharmacist, or allergist immediately for a health assessment and appropriate remedial action. To prevent side effects, consult with a medical professional prior to use.

IN ESSENCE…

    • “The Skin Vitamin,” better known as Liquid Vitamin E, is an antioxidant and a nutrient that is best known for maintaining skin health and for strengthening immunity.
    • Although Vitamin E is often understood to be one specific vitamin, it encompasses a group of other antioxidant vitamins that are fat-soluble, and its numerous natural forms are referred to as Tocopherols.
    • Used topically, Liquid Vitamin E nourishes and promotes the growth of new skin and hair. By soothing and preventing dryness, itching, flaking, and burning, it promotes the look of a youthful, radiant complexion as well as healthier and more lustrous strands.
    • Used in massages, Vitamin E is believed to be applicable for boosting energy and stamina, strengthening muscles, promoting the repair of muscles that have been damaged by exercise, facilitating healing, and possibly reducing the appearance of scars.
  • Used medicinally, Liquid Vitamin E is ideal for those who prefer not to apply harsh prescription medications to address skin conditions characterized by itchiness, inflammation, blisters, and scaly patches of skin.

A Safe Bug Spray That Really Works: Natural Mosquito Repellent

Summer is prime time for enjoying the outdoors. But more often than not, there’s a dark cloud hanging over that backyard barbecue: bugs – and especially mosquitoes. These blood-seeking fun busters expertly follow their senses right to your skin. But if you can repel them with one quick application of bug spray, then what’s the problem? It turns out that many old-fashioned bug sprays contain neurotoxic ingredients that may increase cancer risk. But, worry not – there are plenty of nontoxic essential oil blends that repel the bugs, without the bite to your health.

Why Should We Use Natural Mosquito Repellent?

Mosquito bites are not just annoying. They can also transmit diseases such as malaria, Zika, and dengue fever, among others. So, it’s important to guard against them. Mosquitoes are guided by their sense of smell, which is equipped with hundreds of odor-receptor proteins, and they’re attracted to the carbon dioxide we exhale, our skin odors, and sweat. Although none of these can truly be avoided, there are plant-derived all-natural essential oils that repel bugs and are completely safe for humans. The best part is that natural insect repellents not only have a fresh, clean scent but, most importantly, they are safe to use at any frequency and can be used in place of traditional toxic bug sprays like DEET and picaridin. Plus, natural bug sprays usually have a variety of essential oils to repel a variety of mosquitoes at once.

Of course, if you do get bitten, there’s still hope. Try natural home remedies for mosquito bites.

Essential Oil Mosquito Repellents

Lemon Eucalyptus Oil

Lemon eucalyptus oil (also referred to as PMD) is a hydrodistilled byproduct of lemon eucalyptus and shouldn’t be confused with the essential oil of eucalyptus itself. In concentrations above 30 percent, lemon eucalyptus oil has been shown to provide the same amount of protection for the same amount of time as DEET- and picaridin-derived sprays. Due to its efficacy, it’s one of the few natural ingredients included on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) list of effective mosquito repellents, in addition to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority-approved list.

Lemon eucalyptus is also a natural insecticide that is nontoxic to humans. In fact, some research shows that an all-natural blend of essential oils containing lemon eucalyptus was greater than 95 percent effective, compared to DEET (which was 100 percent effective) at repelling mosquitoes, for up to three hours. That 5 percent disparity seems small, but it represents the difference between a safe and potentially toxic spray.

Lavender Oil

Lavender oil, like thyme and oregano, is naturally toxic to certain mosquitoes and ticks while providing a natural antioxidant effect on humans. This makes it an effective oil to help naturally repel mosquitoes while being beneficial to human health.

Thyme Oil

Thyme oil contains monoterpenes, naturally derived plant extracts that are shown to be as effective as DEET at repelling mosquitoes. Some research also finds that monoterpenes may repel bugs for longer than DEET.

Greek Catnip Oil

You may only know catnip as a feline’s favorite herb, but researchers at Rutgers University have crafted a catnip that not only entertains cats for longer but, more importantly, also has higher concentrations of mosquito-repelling essential oils. Catnip, a member of the mint family, has been shown to suppress the feeding receptors of mosquitoes in multiple ways, which means a more effective natural bug spray.

Other Effective Natural Bug Repellents

Geraniol is naturally derived from rose and citronella oils and has been shown to be an effective insect repellent. Citronella (which is often used in backyard tiki torches and anti-bug candles), along with a vanilla extract, is a powerful essential-oil combo for naturally repelling mosquitoes, even remaining up to 71 percent effective one hour after application. Citronella extract can even repel ticks better than DEET, according to some research.

Other natural essential oils that make an ideal bug spray include peppermint, holy basil, rosemary, and tea tree oil. Peppermint, in addition to geranium, contains menthone, an all-natural extract from essential oils that may repel mosquitoes up to 90 percent effective for up to two hours, compared with DEET, which repelled for only 15 minutes at the same 1 percent concentration. Extracts of cumin and cinnamon are also proven effective mosquito repellents. Plus, eating foods like garlic, vinegar (for example in salad dressing), lemongrass, and chili peppers may help prevent mosquito bites.

DIY Recipes

Try this DIY homemade bug spray recipe with essential oils (EOs):

Ingredients

  • Lemon eucalyptus oil
  • Citronella oil
  • Pure vanilla extract or vanillin
  • Distilled water
  • 1 16oz spray bottle
  • Optional: Witch Hazel

Directions

  1. Mix eight to 10 drops each of lemon eucalyptus oil, citronella, and either pure vanilla extract or vanillin (a vanilla-extract alternative made from wood pulp) into a small spray bottle.
  2. Fill the rest of the bottle with distilled water.
  3. Add an optional splash of witch hazel to soothe itchy skin.

You can increase the amount of essential oil based on your preferences, but, generally, the higher the EO concentration, the more repellent it will be. Remember to always dilute EOs and never use them directly on the skin in undiluted form. Also remember that due to evaporation, natural bug sprays made with essential oils will lose efficacy fairly quickly, so reapply every hour.

The common decorative plant Lantana camara, also known as big sage, red sage, or wild sage, can be mixed with Ocimum gratissimum, (aka clove basil, wild basil, or African basil) to make a natural bug repellent. Try this recipe made from dried plants:

Equipment

  • Food processor or another grinder

Ingredients

  • Wild sage
  • Clove basil
  • A liter of 50 percent ethanol or a liter of 50 percent methanol
  • Distilled water
  • 1 16oz spray bottle
  1. Start by air-drying the leaves at room temperature for two weeks.
  2. Then, grind 500 grams of wild sage and 325 grams of clove basil leaves into a powder in a food processor or other grinder to increase the surface area exposed to the liquid.
  3. Add this to one liter of either 50 percent ethanol (or methanol) and water to extract the most metabolites from the plants, which will not be extractable with water alone.
  4. Let the mixture sit for at least three days, shaking it three times per day. The ethanol should mostly evaporate.
  5. Strain the leaves out with cheesecloth and pour the liquid into a small spray bottle. Add distilled water to fill.

Other Ways to Avoid Mosquito Bites

Reapply Often

Essential-oil-based bug sprays have one big disadvantage – they dissipate more quickly than toxic bug sprays. So just as with sunscreen, make sure you reapply at least once every hour when outdoors.

Avoid Peak Times

Mosquitoes tend to overheat as they’re feeding and are also disrupted by light, which is why they come out to feed at night. If you’re going to be outside for extended periods of time, try to avoid being stationary outside at dusk and night.

Use Plants

Certain plants can help repel bugs, so why not place a few of what are referred to as spatial repellents around your yard and home to help fight against mosquitoes? Citrus plants such as lemon and orange have been used to repel bugs in mosquito-borne-illness-prone regions such as Tanzania, as is the eucalyptus plant. Cinnamosma fragrans, a plant found in Madagascar and South America, has also proven to be an effective bug-repellent plant.

Cover Your Body

Mosquitoes are attracted to sweat and can more easily bite the bare skin. So if you can, cover up as much exposed skin as possible to avoid bug bites.

Get Rid of Standing Water

Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water, which is the number one reason to make sure your pots (indoor or outdoor) have good drainage. If you have a bird feeder, a water feature, or a pond in your garden, consider installing a small solar-powered fountain agitator to keep the water agitated enough to keep mosquitoes from laying eggs.

The Dangers of Traditional Mosquito Repellent

DEET, or N, N-Diethyl-m-toluamide, was first developed in the 1940s by the U.S. military to repel bugs by effectively “blinding” them to human scents besides carbon dioxide. But after decades of use worldwide as a bug repellent and crop insecticide, some research has found that DEET may be unsafe.

Toxic Chemicals Have Side Effects

First, DEET contains harsh chemicals that can potentially trigger tumor growth or seizures in mammals (including humans). Breathing difficulties have also been reported at high concentrations, as has the temporary burning of the skin and mucous membranes. DEET is also unsafe for small children and pregnant women. It also may have immune-suppressing effects and can suppress acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, which means it can have neurotoxic effects.

Not 100% Effective on All Mosquitoes

Not all mosquitoes are repelled by DEET. Even though it’s long-lasting, it’s still not 100 percent effective against all mosquitoes.

Damages Clothing

DEET can slowly dissolve nylons and plastics. Spraying it on these types of fabrics may damage your clothing over time.

Also,

There are many ways to naturally protect yourself from bug bites – and specifically mosquito bites – without covering your skin with unsafe chemicals like DEET. Don’t be afraid to experiment and find your right mix of plant extracts and essential oils to create your own bug spray and repel bugs naturally.

Natural Home Remedies for Mosquito Bites

Few things are more annoying than the itching and scratching that accompanies a fat, juicy mosquito bite. When a mosquito bites us, we itch due to the residual saliva left behind from the insect’s feasting on our blood! Fortunately, just as Mother Nature has honored us with the presence of these buzzing nuisances, she has provided us with some natural home remedies for mosquito bites.

Here are some of my favorite and most-effective natural ways for relieving and treating painful and itchy mosquito bites. I’ve been using these remedies for years, as the mosquitos can get really bad here in Texas. In fact, you may be surprised to find that most of these remedies are common things that you can easily find in your home.

12 Remedies to Treat Mosquito Bites at Home

1. Vinegar

When you first notice the itchy bite, try applying a small amount of vinegar directly to the bump. If you have many bites, you may want to take a very hot bath in a tub filled with water and 2 1/2 cups of vinegar. I would personally recommend using organic apple cider vinegar.

Aloe Vera

2. Aloe

Aloe vera is another excellent remedy for mosquito bites, as well as many other conditions. Not only will it help ease the itching and swelling from the bit, but it will also aid in healing the wound. You can use fresh inner leaf gel directly from an aloe plant or organic aloe juice. They both work well at providing relief.

3. A Dry Bar of Soap

Another remedy for mosquito bits is to rub a bar of dry soap directly on the bite. This will help provide temporary relief to the itching. Remember to wash it off thoroughly after the itch fades away.

4. Baking Soda & Water

Another simple remedy for mosquito bites is to make a thick paste of baking soda and water. Then apply this paste generously to the affected area. You should feel the swelling and itching subside shortly afterward.

5. Onion

Other than making you produce tears, a fresh slice of onion can also help take the sting out of a bite. Simply place a fresh slice on the affected area for several minutes until the itching subsides. Be sure to wash the area thoroughly afterward.

6. Toothpaste

For quick relief from mosquito bites, try applying a small amount of all-natural peppermint or neem-based toothpaste. Allow the paste to dry and leave for as long as desired.

7. Raw Honey

Simply, take a small amount of honey and apply directly to the bite. Honey also has anti-microbial properties that can help prevent infection. I would personally recommend using local raw honey.

Lemons

8. Lime and/or Lemons

I usually apply a small amount of lime juice directly to the bites. Lemon juice also works well. I have also heard that rubbing the bite with the lemon or lime peel helps, but I usually prefer to use the juice. This also helps in keeping the wound from becoming infected from the grit and grime of fingernails.

9. Essential oils

There are many essential oils that can help provide temporary relief for mosquito bites. My favorites are tea tree, rosemary, neem, lavender, witch hazel and cedar oil. Take a small amount and dilute it with water, then apply directly to the bite.

10. Salt Paste

Take finely ground salt and mix with a small amount of water until you have a thick paste. Apply this salt paste directly to bite. I personally use Himalayan salt and find it works best, but iodized salt will also work. The important thing is to make sure it’s finely ground.

Garlic

11. Garlic

Try rubbing a piece of raw garlic on the wound. It is possible that you will feel a small amount of mild burning, but you should feel some major relief afterwards. This is not one that I use with my children, and is wise for to use caution when using this natural remedy. The smell of garlic (and neem) will also help repel the mosquitoes from biting you more later.

12. Ozonated Olive Oil

Ozonated olive oil is a natural health remedy in which olive oil is slowly infused with oxygen over a period of 3-6 months. This process changes the oil to an off-white topical cream that can soothe a variety of conditions. It speeds healing and alleviates swelling and redness from insect bites. Simply apply the cream directly to the bite, and the itching and swelling should stop within minutes.

What Are Volatile Oils?

Volatile (unstable) oils are extremely complex and possibly the most interesting herbal elements that provide the herbalists with a potent aid in carrying out their treatments. However, the fact remains that conventional pharmacologists seldom recognize these oils to be useful.

It is important to note that when herbal remedies are boiled excessively or stored for a prolonged period in conditions that are not favorable, they inevitably lose their volatile elements. This aspect can be easily detected when the aroma of herbal remedies diminishes. Although it is very easy to regulate the quality of the aromatic herbs, these herbs contain much more than their aroma.

On the whole, volatile oils are actually combinations of oxygenated compounds and hydrocarbons that have been derived from the herbs. Since the oxygenated variety easily dissolves in water as well as alcohol, generally this form establishes the flavor as well as the aroma of these mixtures. Terpene is known to be the universal hydrocarbon and it is developed by accretion of isoprene molecules (chemical formula, CsHs) in a row.

Notable Monoterpenes:

By far, monoterpenes form the most prevalent collection of volatile oils.

Menthol:

This volatile oil is obtained from peppermint (botanical name Mentha x Piperita) as well as other members belonging to the mint family. In normal room temperature, menthol is found as crystals. When applied on the skin, menthol has a distinct chilling action, which occurs together with a somewhat locally anesthetizing action, which eventually results in the dilation of the blood vessels locally in the area where it has been applied. Such multiple attributes of menthol make it a well-liked constituent for ointments meant for alleviating muscle as well as joint aches.

In addition, menthol is a potent antiseptic and also possesses anti-parasitic properties. Menthol dissolved in an alcoholic solution is used to treat ringworm. It also seems to be useful for the treatment of scales formed on the scalp, which may often occur together with some hair loss. Inhaling menthol helps to stop the accumulation of catarrh in the nasopharyngeal region and helps to provide relief from nasal congestion’s. Nevertheless, the use of menthol for clearing nasal congestion should only be done for a short period, because continuing the process may result in the accumulation of menthol on the membranes of the respiratory tract causing irritation. In addition, this may even cause the propensity to catarrh to prolong.

When this volatile oil is taken orally, it works as an effectual carminative. While nearly all volatile oils work in this manner when they are ingested, menthol has especially captured the attention of the scientists as well as the medical community, because of its noticeable helpfulness in instances of problems related to the bowels and colitis.

Camphor:

This volatile oil is naturally extracted from the camphor plant (botanical name Cinnamomum camphora). In addition, it may also be prepared synthetically from the pinene base from which turpentine has been isolated. Camphor may also be present in other different plants, for instance, a number of plants belonging to the genus Chrysanthemum spp., Artemisia spp. and also a number of plants belonging to the Labiatae group. Structurally, camphor has the close relation with Borneo (formerly ‘Borneo camphor’), notably present in rosemary (botanical name Rosmarinus officinalis) and also possesses several properties that are common to both.

When applied locally, camphor is anti-inflammatory and rubefacient and produces a cooling effect similar to that of menthol. When camphor is isolated, its state is solid at normal room temperature, something that is common with thymol and menthol. In addition, like menthol, camphor also causes a somewhat anesthetic effect when applied topically to the skin. When used internally, camphor promotes the release of digestive juices as well as saliva, invigorates the peristalsis, and unwinds the sphincters; thereby assisting the entire digestive process. Camphor is also used to stimulate circulation and increase circulation to the peripheral parts of the body. However, the action of camphor on the heart is very inconsistent – it stimulates a failing heart while enhancing coronary circulation. It is worth mentioning here that in Russian folk medicine, people consider the oil of rosemary to be a tonic for the heart.

Like in the case of other different volatile oils, it is also possible to explain many properties of camphor by means of the reflex reactions that are attributable to irritation in the membranes lining the stomach. However, camphor also directly affects the central nervous system (CNS). In effect, this volatile oil promotes the functioning of the central nervous system and is effectual in neutralizing respiratory depressions caused by the use of morphine and barbiturate. Under dissimilar conditions, camphor may produce different feelings like drowsiness, exhilaration, and even stupor. Inhaling camphor helps to promote the flow of mucus and it also works to clear up any blocked condition.

Thujone:

This volatile compound is especially present in the oil of sage (botanical name Salvia officinalis). Precisely speaking, thujone comprises up to 30% of the oil of sage.

Similar to other terpenes, thujone also possesses carminative and antiseptic attributes. However, compared to other terpenes, thujone is somewhat toxic. While sage is a very useful herb for use as a gargle and mouthwash when used internally and in excess, it may result in undesirable side effects. Thujone works to invigorate the smooth muscles and since it also possesses estrogenic attributes, its use is contra-indicated during pregnancy and it may even prevent lactation.

The extent to which this volatile oil contributes to sage’s bizarre actions in slowing down sweating is yet to be ascertained. In fact, use of sage may possibly hold-up or inhibit the glandular secretions throughout the body. Thujone possibly has a beneficial action when used to treat mental conditions. When used in reasonable doses, thujone has a soothing as well as curative effect, possibly in part by means of an antispasmodic action of the viscera. However, when this volatile oil is used in large dosages, it may incite tetchiness.

Other Monoterpenes:

Although sesquiterpenes form the major terpenes group in the plant kingdom, just a few of them are volatile. While the azulenes, farnesene, and bisabolol that are obtained from yarrow and chamomile are volatile, other sesquiterpenes demonstrate fascinating actions in different ways. It has been found that about 60 to 70 non-volatile sesquiterpenes have significant anti-tumor actions. Several other sesquiterpenes have an extremely bitter flavor and these form a part of the bitters type.

As the structure of monoterpenes is relatively simple and owing to enhanced analytic processes as well as their commercial significance in perfumery business, several studies have been undertaken to assess the properties and benefits of monoterpenes in contemporary times. In fact, several of their old chains have been authenticated and also extended.

A number of monoterpenes possess fungicidal as well as anthelmintic effects, for instance, ascaridole and thymol, which form the main constituent of a somewhat toxic conventional agent to get rid of worm infestations. Similarly, there are a number of monoterpenes that work as excellent insect repellents, for instance, citronellal.

Some monoterpenes have an effect on our nervous system. For instance, all carminatives belong to this class, they have an antispasmodic action by the limited response on the nerve endings present in the stomach. Nevertheless, the action of monoterpenes on our nervous system is definitely further widespread than what has been just mentioned. A detailed study of the activities of a patented German preparation called ‘Melissengeist’, which has been extracted from the herb called lemon balm (botanical name Melissa officinalis) revealed that a number of its constituents, for example, limonene, citral, citronellal, citronellol, and geraniol, had a significant sedative action and among these components citronellal was found to be the most powerful.

It was found that all these monoterpenes were considerably effective even at low concentration of just 1 mg for every kg of body weight. A number of these monoterpenes had noticeable antispasmodic action when used in concentrations equal to that of morphine alkaloid papaverine. What was all the more interesting is that they showed a clear effect when used at the uppermost centers, as in the instance of problems related to psycho-autonomic problems accompanied by – headaches, restiveness, excitability, and palpitations. It is worth mentioning that similar monoterpenes are present in a concentrated form in the cat’s hippocampus (inside the limbic system) and this corroborates the specific central actions of the substances belonging to this group.

The iridoids, as well as their glycosides, form another monoterpenes group that possesses an elevated level of pharmacological or therapeutic actions. However, this group of monoterpenes is non-volatile.

Sesquiterpenes:

As the molecular weight of the sesquiterpenes is comparatively greater, they are not as volatile as the monoterpenes. And therefore, they are not as much related to the volatile oils. Some of the best sesquiterpenes are those that are obtained from the chamomiles (for instance Matricaria recutita and Anthemis nobilis) as well as yarrow (Achillea millefolium).

The Azulenes:

These compounds, which include chamazulene obtained from yarrow and chamomile, and guaiazulene obtained from lignum-vitae (botanical name Guaiacum officinale) are not present in the natural condition in any amount. The azulenes are made in the form of products by means of a process known as steam distillation that is used to extract them from the volatile forerunners present in the plant, for instance, Achilles, matricin or artesian. The azulenes are also found in sufficient amounts following the usual process of preparing an infusing from the plants in hot water, particularly when the process is undertaken in a sealed container that permits the rising steam to condense again and mix with the liquid. In order to obtain the utmost value of the herbal remedies prepared from yarrow and chamomile, it is essential that you prepare a tisane (an aromatic herbal tea) with these therapeutic plants or use them to prepare a hot infusion. It is important that you exercise some caution while undertaking these processes.

As antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory agents, the azulenes are very effective, as they successfully diminish the reactions of the tissues that have been brought on by histamines. In addition, they are also useful in soothing the nervous system – centrally, as in the case of anxiety as well as peripherally, as in the instance of visceral tension. The actions of the azulenes also include lessening the outcome of anaphylaxis consequent on the allergic reactions. Therefore, these substances are recommended for treating various health conditions, including allergic asthma, fever, and allergic eczema. The azulenes are potently antiseptic when they come in contact with our body.

Bisabolol:

In addition to one more sesquiterpene farnesene that possesses anti-inflammatory attributes, bisabolol forms a natural constituent of the unstable oil of chamomile. This compound functions as a partial compensation for any utilization of the plant, which does not entail heating with water. It has been found that bisabolol lessens the amount of pepsin, a proteolytic enzyme, secreted in our stomach and does not have any effect on the stomach acid production. This implies that there is a particular interaction with the activity of pepsin. This is a hint that bisabolol may be possibly used for treating diseases related to the stomach as well as the upper part of the intestine. In addition, it has been found that bisabolol’s anti-inflammatory action is direct.

The Fragrant Way to Beauty: Wrinkles and the Aging Skin

We don’t always notice ourselves aging, nor perhaps do our close friends and family, yet when we meet someone we haven’t seen for several years, we notice they have aged, and they notice that we have too. That’s often when we are struck by the thunderbolt of recognition that age has crept up on us silently.

The search for the elixir of youth is as old as the hills. Ancient texts abound with tales of alchemists striving to satisfy that demand from their rulers. Today, exclusive clinics offer natural cosmetic treatments to those who can afford them, and celebrity clients keep the source of their youthful appearance a closely guarded secret. After all, if everyone looks as great as they do, it defeats the purpose of looking better than the rest! Cosmetic surgery is an almost commonplace, and injectable treatments are so ubiquitous they’re something people now have done at home. Investment bankers know that if they can find the fledgling company with the latest answer to the ancient question – how to stay young? – they would be flying high!

Behind the scenes of all this frenetic activity, nature’s essential oils have been quietly playing their part. Aromatherapy began in Europe, where it’s widely incorporated into all aspects of life, including at the ritzy Swiss clinics reserved for les clients privee. Cellular regeneration is the key to youthful skin, and because skin cells renew themselves all the time, there’s hope for improvement. Cells need oxygen, which some essential oils may encourage with their circulation-stimulating properties. They also have antioxidant activity, which is needed to deal with free radicals that can easily destroy molecules, including those of all skin layers. Also, some essential oils contain phytohormones, hormonal-like properties that may account for their being able to give skin a firmer and more youthful appearance when used over time.

antiaging image

Essential Oils for Aging Skin

Many essential oils have properties that can help prevent the onset of the telltale signs of aging. The following are used in various combinations by aromatherapists to treat the effects of declining skin tone. Some essential oils have more potent effects than others, and these are often used in combinations. However, some – such as neroli, spikenard, rose, and jasmine – are used singly in luxury anti-aging products.

Anti-Aging Essential Oils

Rose Otto {Rosa damascena}

Rose absolute {Rosa centifolia}

Juniper berry {Juniperus communis}

Marjoram, sweet {Origanum majorana}

Violet leaf {Viola odorata}

Mastic {Pistacia lentiscus}

Clary sage {Salvia sclarea}

Neroli {Citrus aurantium}

Spikenard {Nardostachys jatamansi}

Cardamom {Elettaria cardamomum}

Rosewood {Aniba rosaeodora}

Chamomile German {Matricaria recutita}

Carrot seed {Daucus carota}

Frankincense {Boswellia carterii}

Immortelle {Helichrysum italicum}

Magnolia flower {Michelia alba}

Geranium {Pelargonium graveolens}

Palmarosa {Cymbopogon martinii}

Petitgrain {Citrus aurantium}

Ylang ylang {Cananga odorata}

Lavender {Lavandula angustifolia}

Sandalwood {Santalum album}

Orange, sweet {Citrus sinensis}

Cistus {Cistus ladaniferus}

Jasmine {Jasminum grandiflorum/officinale}

Patchouli {Pogostemon cablin}

Rosemary {Rosmarinus officinalis}

Coriander seed {Coriandrum sativum}

In this section, you will find special combination formulas for face treatments for four age groups, because the skin has different requirements at different stages of life. Using the correct essential oil for your facial skin serum or oil can be more than just taking into account the skin condition and the hoped-for outcome. Before blending a personal anti-aging facial oil, a holistic aesthetician specializing in essential oil skin care will examine the skin and take into account your well-being, overall health, stress levels, and any emotional factors that might be affecting your skin’s condition and rate of aging. So before you choose your oils, cross-reference to see which would be the most appropriate for you. And because you are making these products yourself, you can adapt them over time to take account of changes in your personal circumstances.

Each essential oil has its own particular qualities. For example, geranium can help with specific skin conditions such as drying or dry patches on the face, increased oiliness, enlarged pores, wrinkles and lines, dark circles under the eyes, and lack of elasticity – all of which can result from going through difficult emotional experiences. But it can also help with the underlying trauma by reducing stress, tiredness, and anxiety – the sort of anxious feelings that can keep a person awake at night and contribute to an aging skin.

Life presents many hurdles, and even on a day-to-day basis, most of us are juggling a career, personal relationships, and child care, not to mention maintaining financial security. Any resulting anxieties could inhibit the action of the immune, digestive, and lymphatic systems – all of which can have an effect on the skin. Despite all this, forget about aging gracefully. No one wants to look their age, and I’ve never met anyone – male or female – who doesn’t want to age as well as they can. So fight it every step of the way.

organic skin care

Skin-Enhancing Oil Extracts for Use in Face Oils

You have heard of the Gold Rush? Well, welcome to the Oil Rush! Patent offices all over the world are receiving applications from cosmetic company research labs trying to corner the market on processing methods for and commercial use of plant oils – with any variation thereof you could possibly imagine! Fortunately, this drive for monopoly doesn’t affect the normal user of these oils – you and me – so we can still take advantage of them.

Before getting to the antiwrinkle oils for the various age groups, we will look at some of the most beneficial additions you could incorporate in small quantities into your oil blends. These can be used on the face, neck, and decollete area of the upper chest.

Acai berry oil {Euterpe oleracea}: Emollient, nourishing skin oil used in anti-aging preparations; has moisturizing and anti-inflammatory properties; suits damaged, extra-dry skin types; conditions the skin; includes omegas 6 and 9 and vitamin E; antioxidant.

Blackberry seed oil {Rubus fructicosis}: Skin nourishing and conditioning oil; suits mature, dry, and sensitive skins; includes omegas 3, 6, and 9 and vitamin E; antioxidant.

Black raspberry seed oil {Rubus occidentalis}: Helps retain elasticity; suits most skin types; anti-aging; includes omegas 3, 6, and 9 and vitamin E; antioxidant.

Blueberry seed oil {Vaccinium corymbosum}: Skin protecting oil with antioxidant properties; suits most skin types; including those with acne or blemishes.

Borage seed oil {Borago officinalis}: Moisturizing and nourishing; effective for skin maintenance oils; suits most skin types; high in gamma-linolenic acid {GLA}.

Chia seed oil {Salvia hispanica}: High in omega 3.

Cranberry seed oil {Vaccinium macroscarpon}: Good moisturizing and nourishing properties for anti-aging; suits damaged, irritated, or prematurely aged skin; includes omega 3 and vitamin E; antioxidant.

Cucumber seed oil {Cucumis sativus}: Good moisturizing and skin protection properties; cell regenerating; revitalizing, improves the elasticity and strength of the skin; anti-aging; suitable for most skin types.

Evening primrose seed oil {Oenothera biennis}: Skin conditioning and skin strengthening; useful in anti-aging skin care and scar-reducing facial oils; can be used on most skin types; high in GLA.

Gotu kola {Centella asiatica}: Macerated oil; skin regenerative; stimulates synthesis of collagen.

Hemp seed oil {Cannabis sativa}: Nourishing and skin conditioning; helps retain moisture and skin elasticity in troubled and distressed skin.

Olive squalane extract {Olea europaea}: Skin soothing and softening; suits most skin types; suits extra-dry skin; Anti-aging.

Pomegranate seed oil {Punica granatum}: Nourishing and moisturizing; improves skin elasticity; rejuvenating; conditioning; high in omega 5 fatty acid {conjugated linoleic acid, or CLA}.

Red raspberry seed oil {Rubus idaeus}: Skin protective; anti-inflammatory; nourishing and conditioning for damaged and dry skin; includes omega3 and 6 and vitamin E; antioxidant.

Rosehip seed oil {Rosa rubiginosa}: Cell regenerating and cell-stimulating; improve the appearance of scarring; improves texture and elasticity of the skin; anti-aging; suits mature and sun-damaged skin types.

Sea buckthorn berry oil {Hippophae rhamnoides}: Nourishing and revitalizing; cell regenerating; suits most skin types including prematurely aged skin; Anti-aging.

Strawberry seed oil {Fragaria ananassa}: Moisturizing and texture improving; suits most skin types including oily skin types; blemishes.

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The Antiwrinkle Night Oils

The following blends are suggestions for general applications and should suit most people. The blends take into account the various health and well-being issues usually associated with the different age groups.

Antiwrinkle Night Oil for the Over-Twenties

Petitgrain – 4 drops

Lavender – 5 drops

Rosemary – 5 drops

Chamomile German – 2 drops

Chamomile Roman – 2 drops

Lemon – 4 drops

Geranium – 7 drops

Plus the plant oils:

Rosehip seed oil – 20 drops

Evening primrose seed oil – 10 drops

First, blend the essential oils together. Then add the plant oils into the essential oils. Dilute this blend of oils by adding 1 or 2 drops to each teaspoon {5mL} of your chosen carrier oil – such as hazelnut, almond, or apricot kernel oil. Lightly apply a small amount of the fully diluted oil over the face, neck, and decolletage.

Antiwrinkle Night Oil for the Over-Thirties

Sandalwood – 4 drops

Palmarosa – 5 drops

Lavender – 4 drops

Rosewood – 5 drops

Orange, sweet – 4 drops

Chamomile Roman – 2 drops

Carrot seed – 3 drops

Plus the plant oils:

Rosehip seed oil – 20 drops

Sea buckthorn oil – 10 drops

First, blend the essential oils together. Then add the plant oils into the essential oils. Dilute this blend of oils by adding 1 or 2 drops to each teaspoon {5 mL} of your chosen carrier oil – such as hazelnut, almond, or apricot kernel oil. Lightly apply a small amount of the fully diluted oil over the face, neck, and decolletage.

Antiwrinkle Night Oil for the Over-Forties

Neroli – 6 drops

Lavender – 4 drops

Frankincense – 5 drops

Rosemary – 2 drops

Cistus – 3 drops

Lemon – 3 drops

Immortelle – 2 drops

Carrot seed – 3 drops

Plus the plant oils:

Evening primrose seed oil – 10 drops

Rosehip seed oil – 10 drops

Sea buckthorn oil – 15 drops

First, blend the essential oils together. Then add the plant oils into the essential oils. Dilute this blend of oils by adding 2 – 3 drops to each teaspoon {5 mL} of your chosen carrier oil – such as hazelnut, almond, or apricot kernel oil. Lightly apply a small amount of the fully diluted oil over the face, neck, and decolletage.

Antiwrinkle Night Oil for the Over-Fifties

Cistus – 3 drops

Immortelle – 3 drops

Geranium – 5 drops

Rose absolute – 5 drops

Lavender – 3 drops

Ho wood – 4 drops

Plus the plant oils:

Rosehip seed oil – 30 drops

Sea buckthorn oil – 30 drops

Evening primrose seed oil – 10 drops

First, blend the essential oils together. Then add the plant oils into the essential oils. Dilute this blend of oils by adding 2 – 3 drops to each teaspoon {5 mL} of your chosen carrier oil – such as hazelnut, almond, or apricot kernel oil. Lightly apply a small amount of the diluted oil over the face, neck, and decolletage.

The Fragrant Way to Beauty: Skin Care Oils

Skincare oils are one of the best ways to take care of your skin and can easily be adapted to take into account changes in circumstances, such as stress levels, health, lifestyle, and general well-being. These factors often change from month to month, and by blending your own skin care oils you can accommodate your ever-changing skin care needs, which reflect physical, environmental, and emotional factors.

The first step in deciding which particular skincare regime to choose is to establish which basic skin type you have.

Many people believe their skin is a combination of skin types. Combination skin is a patchwork of normal, oily, and dry skin, with the oil patches usually occurring on the forehead, nose, and chin. This type of skin can develop at any time from changes in health, lifestyle, working conditions, and, of course, stress levels. Treat combination skin as you would normal skin, and if the oily patches become a problem use the face oils for oily skin on those areas. As the skin starts to balance you can adjust the treatment accordingly. Our skins can change quite rapidly, so do take notice of the changes and be ready to switch oils as and when needed.

Spa scene with natural cosmetics

Evenly Balanced – Normal Skin

Really, there’s no such thing as normal skin. Or, more correctly, children have normal skin, and the rest of us aspire to it. The perfect skin of prepuberty is plump, in that the cells are firm and solid, neither dry nor oily, finely textured with no visible pores, spots, or blemishes, soft and velvety to the touch, and unwrinkled. Adults can only yearn for this perfection, and we call skin “normal” if it reaches somewhere near it – about halfway is close enough. The term normal is so inappropriate in this context that I prefer to call this type of skin evenly balanced.

Balanced Normal Skin: Carrier Oils

Almond, sweet {Prunus Amygdalus var. dulcis}

Apricot kernel {Prunus armeniaca}

Hazelnut {Corylus avellana}

Jojoba {Simmondsia chinensis}

Argan {Argania spinosa}

Camellia seed {Camellia japonica}

Specialist Plant Oil Additions for Balanced Normal Skin

Evening primrose seed {Oenothera biennis}

Rosehip seed {Rosa rubiginosa}

Borage seed {Borago officinalis}

Carrot, macerated {Daucus carota}

Cucumber seed {Cucumis sativus}

Pomegranate seed {Punica granatum}

Sea buckthorn {Hippophae rhamnoides}

Passionflower seed {Passifloria incarnata}

Kiwi seed {Actinidia chinensis}

Essential Oils for Balanced Normal Skin

Chamomile German {Matricaria recutita}

Lemon {Citrus limon}

Palmarosa {Cymbopogon martinii}

Neroli {Citrus aurantium}

Geranium {Pelargonium graveolens}

Jasmine {Jasminum grandiflorum/officinale}

Lavender {Lavandula angustifolia}

Rose otto {Rosa damascena}

Frankincense {Boswellia carterii}

Chamomile Roman {Anthemis nobilis}

Day Care Oil for Balanced Normal Skin

Rose Otto – 14 drops

Geranium – 3 drops

Chamomile Roman – 2 drops

Lavender – 3 drops

Lemon – 3 drops

Optional additions to 1 fl. oz. {30 mL} of carrier oil:

Rosehip seed oil – 20 drops

Carrot macerated oil – 10 drops

First, blend the essential oils together, then dilute 2 – 3 drops in each teaspoon {5 mL} of hazelnut or sweet almond carrier oil. Apply a small amount to damp skin, massage into the face and neck, avoiding the eye area, and then dab the face with a tissue to remove excess oil.

Night Care Oil for Balanced Normal Skin

Geranium – 9 drops

Palmarosa – 5 drops

Rosewood – 5 drops

Orange, sweet – 3 drops

Lavender – 5 drops

Optional additions to 1 fl. oz. {30 mL} of carrier oil:

Rosehip seed oil – 20 drops

Sea buckthorn – 10 drops

First, blend the essential oils together, then dilute 2 -3 drops in each teaspoon {5 mL} of camellia seed oil to which you’ve added 5 drops of evening primrose seed oil. Apply a small amount to damp skin, massage into the face and neck, avoiding the eye area, and then dab the face with a tissue to remove excess oil.

skin care solutions

Normal to Dry Skin

The cells on the outer surface of the skin are essentially at the last stage of the shedding process, known as desquamation, and are held together by the hydrolipidic film. This consists of amino acids and lactic acid from sweat, fatty acids from sebum, and moisturizing by-products of keratinization – which is the process by which skin cells are shed from the top layer and replaced by those underneath. When the hydrolipidic layer is disturbed for some reason, the skin feels dry. This may be because the normal pH balance is disturbed, not enough sebum is being produced, the skin is being dried out by central heating, there are hormonal changes, medications have upset the normal balance of the skin protection system, or for many other reasons.

When the skin becomes dry it’s less supple and more prone to wrinkles, and it can even become flaky. In time it can become sensitive, prone to inflammation, and easily dehydrated by wind and sun. This type of skin is prone to peeling and itching during periods of stress. It generally feels taut after washing. Sometimes dry skin is caused by hormonal changes and menopause.

Normal to Dry Skin: Carrier Oils

Almond, sweet {Prunus Amygdalus var. dulcis}

Avocado {Persea americana}

Apricot kernel {Prunus armeniaca}

Argan {Argaania spinosa}

Hemp seed {Cannabis sativa}

Meadowfoam {Limnanthes alba}

Rice bran {Oryza sativa}

Macadamia {Macadamia ternifolia}

Camellia seed {Camellia japonica}

Specialist Plant Oil Additions for Normal to Dry Skin

Evening primrose seed {Oenothera biennis}

Borage seed {Borago officinalis}

Red raspberry seed {Rubus idaeus}

Acai berry {Euterpe oleracea}

Olive squalane {Olea europaea}

Rosehip seed {Rosa rubiginosa}

Sea buckthorn {Hippophae rhamnoides}

Cranberry seed {Vaccinium macrocarpon}

Carrot, macerated {Daucus carota}

Essential Oils for Normal to Dry Skin

Chamomile German {Matricaria recutita}

Chamomile Roman {Anthemis nobilis}

Lavender {Lavandula angustifolia}

Sandalwood {Santalum album}

Geranium {Pelargonium graveolens}

Rose Otto {Rosa damascena}

Palmarosa {Cymbopogon martinii}

Carrot seed {Daucus carota}

Ho wood {Cinnamomum camphora ct. linalool}

Neroli {Citrus aurantium}

Clary sage {Salvia sclarea}

Frankincense {Boswellia carterii}

Day Care Oil for Normal to Dry Skin

Chamomile German – 3 drops

Sandalwood – 15 drops

Mandarin – 3 drops

Ho wood – 4 drops

Optional additions to 1 fl. oz. {30 mL} of carrier oil:

Olive squalane oil – 20 drops

Raspberry seed oil – 10 drops

First, blend the essential oils together, then dilute 2 – 3 drops in each teaspoon {5 mL} of camellia seed oil, to which you’ve added 2 drops of evening primrose seed oil. Apply a small amount to damp skin, massage into face and neck, avoiding the eye area, and then dab the face with a tissue to remove excess oil.

Night Care Oil for Normal to Dry Skin

Carrot seed – 5drops

Sandalwood – 8 drops

Lavender – 3 drops

Clary sage – 3 drops

Palmarosa – 4 drops

Optional additions to 1 fl. oz. {30 mL} of apricot kernel or sweet almond carrier oil:

Olive squalane oil – 20 drops

Rosehip seed oil – 30 drops

skin care oils3

Normal to Oily Skin

Oily skin is caused by overactive sebaceous glands. These are subject to hormonal changes, which is why oily skin can be a problem during puberty. Overactive sebaceous glands can lead to seborrhea, but more often the problem presents as oily patches that leave the skin shiny. Ironically, an oily skin can result from over cleanliness – from scrubbing the face with harsh cleansers and soaps or using astringents that contain alcohol. Many commercial lotions designed to degrease the skin actually stimulate the sebaceous glands to produce more sebum. Thankfully, essential oils have the capacity to balance the skin without prompting the glands to produce more sebum and can provide the perfect solution to this seemingly intractable problem.

Normal to Oily Skin: Carrier Oils

Hazelnut {Corylus avellana}

Grapeseed {Vitis vinifera}

Safflower {Carthamus tinctorius}

Hemp seed {Cannabis sativa}

Sunflower {Helianthus annuus}

Jojoba {Simmondsia chinensis}

Argan {Argania spinosa}

Specialist Plant Oil Additions for Normal to Oily Skin

Borage seed {Borago officinalis}

Carrot, macerated {Daucus carota}

Rosehip seed {Rosa rubiginosa}

Kiwi seed {Actinidia chinensis}

Sea buckthorn {Hippophae rhamnoides}

Blueberry seed {Vaccinium corymbosum}

Echium seed {Echium plantaginoum}

Strawberry seed {Fragaria ananassa}

Essential Oils for Normal to Oily Skin

Chamomile German {Matricaria recutita}

Lavender {Lavandula angustifolia}

Geranium {Pelargonium graveolens}

Frankincense {Boswellia carterii}

Juniper berry {Juniperus communis}

Cypress {Cupressus sempervirens}

Palmarosa {Cymbopogon martinii}

Petitgrain {Citrus aurantium}

Bergamot {Citrus bergamia}

Patchouli {Pogostemon cablin}

Niaouli {Melaleuca quinquenervia}

Orange, sweet {Citrus sinensis}

Lemon {Citrus limon}

Marjoram, sweet {Origanum majorana}

Lime {Citrus aurantifolia}

Rosemary {Rosmarinus officinalis}

Jasmine {Jasminum grandiflorum/officinale}

Ylang ylang {Cananga odorata}

Day Care Oil for Normal to Oily Skin

Juniper berry – 8 drops

Geranium – 10 drops

Petitgrain – 10 drops

Rosemary – 2 drops

Optional additions to 1 fl. oz. {30 mL} of carrier oil:

Kiwi seed oil – 10 drops

Borage seed oil – 10 drops

First, blend the essential oils together, then dilute 2 -3 drops in each teaspoon {5 mL} of jojoba or sunflower oil, to which you’ve added 10 drops of carrot macerated oil. Apply a small amount to damp skin, massage into the face and neck, avoiding the eye area, and then dab the face with a tissue to remove excess oil.

Night Care Oil for Normal to Oily Skin

Juniper berry – 10 drops

Petitgrain – 15 drops

Frankincense – 5 drops

Marjoram, sweet – 5 drops

Orange, sweet – 10 drops

Optional additions to 1 fl. oz. {30 mL} of carrier oil:

Rosehip seed oil – 10 drops

Blueberry seed oil – 10 drops

Evening primrose seed oil – 5 drops

First, blend the essential oils together, then dilute 2 – 3 drops in each teaspoon {5 mL} of hazelnut oil. Apply a small amount to damp skin, massage into the face and neck, avoiding the eye area, and then dab the face with a tissue to remove excess oil.

Moisturizing cosmetic oil on the flowers and water background

Sensitive Skin

Anyone’s skin can become sensitive at any time. Even skin previously considered normal can become prone to sensitivity after contracting a virus, eating certain foods, coming in contact with synthetic perfumes or synthetic cosmetic ingredients, including preservatives, and so on. Some skins become sensitive only during extremes of weather – when it’s too cold, hot, or windy. Sometimes skin changes can be linked to an emotional situation, such as the loss of a loved one, moving or changing jobs, stress, or even just a change in lifestyle. It could be too that the skin can no longer deal with environmental pressures such as overheating at the workplace, too much electrosmog, or pollution. Sensitive skin can also be inherited. Allergies can develop suddenly, and for clues, as to what’s causing the trouble it may be useful to have patch testing carried out.

If you’ve become sensitive to skin care products in general, it could be that you’ll be sensitive to certain plant oils or essential oils too. This is why it’s important for you to carry out a skin test before using anything on the face. Apply a small amount of oil, or diluted essential oil, in the crook of an elbow or behind the ear, and leave it for 24 hours. If there’s no reaction such as itchiness, redness, soreness, or swelling, then that oil might suit you.

The best choices for highly sensitive skins are water-based products such as hydrolats, hydrosols, plant distillates, floral waters, and the like. Only use essential oils in very low dosages, increasing the amount used as you become confident there’s no skin reaction, and use carrier oils that are known to be gentle on the skin. As this is such an individual situation – everyone is different in terms of their sensitivities and reactions – not all the suggestions below might be appropriate for you. Always choose organic products.

Hydrolats for Sensitive Skin

Chamomile Roman {Anthemis nobilis}

Chamomile German {Matricaria recutita}

Lavender {Lavandula angustifolia}

Rose {Rosa damascena/centifolia}

Essential Oils for Sensitive Skin

Lavender {Lavandula angustifolia}

Chamomile German {Matricaria recutita}

Chamomile Roman {Anthemis nobilis}

Geranium {Pelargonium graveolens}

Sandalwood {Santalum album}

Neroli {Citrus aurantium}

Carrier Oils for Sesitive Skin

Almond, sweet {Prunus amygdalus var. dulcis}

Rice bran {Oryza sativa}

Jojoba {Simmondsia chinensis}

Calendula, macerated {Calendula officinalis}

Grapeseed {Vitis vinifera}

Camellia seed {Camellia japonica}

 

The Fragrant Way to Beauty; Facial Sprays and Tonics

Gentle facial sprays can have many purposes; for example, they can cool, calm, and give the skin an all-around boost. Some are tonic, some astringent – all are refreshing. They can help refine open pores and smooth unevenly textured skin. Facial sprays are generally applied after cleansing to ensure the complete removal of any residue left from creams and lotions, and they can also be used during the day or evening to refresh the skin. For a facial spray, use a single hydrolat or a combination of hydrolats, or combine a hydrolat and a floral water, or aloe vera liquid, with a quality non-tap water.

For a facial tonic, use a hydrolat combined with essential oil. Combine the hydrolats, glycerin or aloe vera, and essential oil together in a bottle, shake really well, and leave to stand for at least 24 hours. Shake the bottle again, filter through an unbleached paper coffee filter to remove any essential oil globules, and store in the fridge.

Hydrosol/Hydrolat and Other Waters* for Face Tonics

Normal Skin

*Waters: hydrolats, hydrosols, essential oil waters, or floral distillates

Lavender {Lavandula angustifolia}

Geranium {Pelargonium graveolens}

Immortelle {Helichrysum italicum}

Spearmint {Mentha spicata}

Lemon {Citrus limon}

Cornflower {Centaurea cyanus}

Orange flower {Citrus aurantium}

Rose {Rosa damascena/centifolia}

Face Tonic for Normal Skin

Geranium water – 3 fl. oz. {90 mL}

Lavender water – 1 fl. oz. {30 mL}

Vegetable glycerin – 1 teaspoon {5 mL}

Geranium essential oil – 2 drops

Spearmint essential oil – 1 drop

Lavender essential oil – 1 drop

To create a fusion, combine the hydrolats, glycerin, and essential oils together in a bottle, shake really well, and leave to stand for at least 24 hours. Shake the bottle again, filter through an unbleached paper coffee filter to remove any essential oil globules, and store in the fridge.

Normal to Dry Skin

*Waters: hydrolats, hydrosols, essential oil waters, or floral distillates

Rose {Rosa damascena/centifolia}

Lavender {Lavandula angustifolia}

Chamomile Roman  {Anthemis nobilis}

Chamomile German {Matricaria recutita}

Cornflower {Centaurea cyanus}

Geranium {Pelargonium graveolens}

Face Tonic for Normal to Dry Skin

Rose water – 2 fl. oz. {60 mL}

Chamomile water – 2 fl. oz. {60 mL}

Vegetable glycerin – 1 teaspoon {5 mL}

Sandalwood essential oil – 4 drops

Ho wood essential oil – 2 drops

To create a fusion, combine the hydrolats, glycerin, and essential oils together in a bottle, shake really well, and leave to stand for at least 24 hours. Shake the bottle again, filter through an unbleached paper coffee filter to remove any essential oil globules, and store in the fridge.

Normal to Sensitive Skin

*Waters, hydrolats, hydrosols, essential oil waters, or floral distillates

Chamomile Roman {Anthemis nobilis}

Lavender {Lavandula augustifolia}

Chamomile German {Matricaria recutita}

Cornflower {Centaurea cyanus}

Clary sage {Salvia sclarea}

Yarrow {Achillea millefolium}

Marigold {Calendula officinalis}

Face Tonic for Normal to Sensitive Skin

Chamomile Roman water – 2 fl. oz. {60 mL}

Lavender water – 2 fl. oz. {60 mL}

Aloe vera liquid – 1 teaspoon {5 mL}

Chamomile German essential oil – 1 drop

Lavender essential oil – 2 drops

To create a fusion, combine the hydrolats, aloe vera, and essential oils together in a bottle, shake really well, and leave to stand for at least 24 hours. Shake the bottle again, filter through an unbleached paper coffee filter to remove any essential oil globules, and store in the fridge.

Normal to Blemished or Acned Skin

*Waters: hydrolats, hydrosols, essential oil waters, or floral distillates

Pine {Pinus sylvestris}

Rosemary {Rosmarinus officinalis}

Thyme {Thymus vulgaris}

Manuka {Leptospermum scopartium}

Tea tree {Melaleuca alternifolia}

Bay laurel {Laurus nobilis}

Lavender {Lavandula angustifolia}

Sage {Salvia officinalis}

Melissa {Melissa officinalis}

Face Tonic for Normal to Blemished or Acned Skin

Rosemary water – 3 fl. oz. {90 mL}

Lavender water – 1 fl. oz. {30 mL}

Aloe vera liquid – 1 teaspoon {5 mL}

Juniper berry essential oil – 2 drops

Geranium essential oil – 2 drops

To create a fusion, combine the hydrolats, aloe vera, and essential oils together in a bottle, shake really well, and leave to stand for at least 24 hours. Shake the bottle again, filter through an unbleached paper coffee filter to remove any essential oil globules, and store in the fridge.

Normal to Oily Skin

*Waters: hydrolats, hydrosols, essential oil waters, or floral distillates

Cypress {Cupressus sempervirens}

Spearmint {Mentha spicata}

Clary Sage {Salvia sclarea}

Lemon {Citrus limon}

Rosemary {Rosmarinus officinalis}

Pine {Pinus sylvestris}

Myrtle {Myrtus communis}

Rose {Rosa damascena/centifolia}

Orange flower {Citrus aurantium}

Petitgrain {Citrus aurantium}

Face Tonic for Normal to Oily Skin

Orange flower water – 3 fl. oz. {90 mL}

Rose water – 1 fl. oz. {30 mL}

Aloe vera liquid – 1 teaspoon {5 mL}

Petitgrain essential oil – 4 drops

Orange, sweet, essential oil – 2 drops

To create a fusion, combine the hydrolats, aloe vera, and essential oils together in a bottle, shake really well, and leave to stand for at least 24 hours. Shake the bottle again, filter through an unbleached paper coffee filter to remove any essential oil globules, and store in the fridge.

Mature to Aged Skin

*Waters: hydrolats, hydrosols, essential oil waters, or floral distillates

Cistus {Cistus ladaniferus}

Geranium {Pelargonium graveolens}

Rose {Rosa damascena/centifolia}

Mastic {Pistacia lentiscus}

Frankincense {Boswellia carterii}

Melissa {Melissa officinalis}

Face Tonic for Mature to Aged Skin

Rose water – 2 fl. oz. {60 mL}

Melissa water – 1 fl. oz. {30 mL}

Frankincense water – 1 fl. oz. {30 mL}

Vegetable glycerin – 1 teaspoon {5 mL}

Aloe vera liquid – 1 teaspoon {5 mL}

Frankincense essential oil – 1 drop

Palmarosa essential oil – 1 drop

to create a fusion, combine the hydrolats, glycerin, aloe vera, and essential oils together in a bottle, shake really well, and leave to stand for at least 24 hours. Shake the bottle again, filter through an unbleached paper coffee filter to remove any essential oil globules, and store in the fridge.

Suggestion: 

Cotton-wool pads can be soaked in a tonic or aloe vera liquid and then divided into thinner sections before being put in a tightly sealed box with an extra couple of teaspoons of tonic passed over them – and, hey presto, you have your own brand of natural, instant, freshen-up facial pads.

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Astringents

Sometimes a stronger facial tonic is required, one with more astringent values. These incorporate vinegars and can be used on skins that are normal, oily, blemished, or acned. Combine the liquid ingredients, then add the essential oils, shake well, leave for 24 hours, shake again, pass through an unbleached paper coffee filter to remove any essential oil globules, and keep the fusion in the fridge.

General Astringent Tonic

Witch hazel – 1 fl. oz. {30 mL}

Orange flower water – 3 fl. oz. {90 mL}

Cider vinegar, organic {optional} – 1/2 teaspoon {2 1/2 mL}

Juniper berry essential oil – 3 drops

Lemon essential oil – 1 drop

Grapefruit essential oil – 1 drop

Stimulating Astringent Tonic

Witch hazel – 1 fl. oz. {30 mL}

Rose water – 3 fl. oz. {90 mL}

Cider vinegar, organic {optional} – 1/2 teaspoon {2 1/2 mL}

Rosemary essential oil – 2 drops

Spearmint essential oil – 1 drop

Bergamot FCF essential oil – 1 drop

Skin Vinegar for Blemished, Oily, and Open-Pored Skin

Spring water – 3 1/2 tablespoons {50 mL}

Orange flower water – 5 teaspoons {25 mL}

White wine vinegar, organic – 3 teaspoons {15 mL}

Palmarosa essential oil – 2 drops

Spearmint esential oil – 1 drop

A Powerful Anti-Inflammatory Oil; Ginger Oil

Ginger Essential Oil or Ginger Root Oil is derived from the root of the Zingiber officinale herb, better known as Ginger, which is named after the Greek word “zingiberis” meaning “horn-shaped.” This flowering perennial belongs to the plant family that includes Turmeric and Cardamom and is native to the south of China; however, its growth has spread to other parts of Asia, India, the Moluccas – also known as the Spice Islands, West Africa, Europe, and the Caribbean.

For thousands of years, Ginger Root has been used in folk medicine for its ability to soothe inflammation, fevers, colds, respiratory discomforts, nausea, menstrual complaints, upset stomachs, arthritis, and rheumatism. It has also traditionally been used as an anti-microbial food preservative that prevents the growth of harmful bacteria, and it has been used as a spice for its flavoring and digestive properties. In Ayurvedic medicine, Ginger Oil has traditionally been believed to soothe emotional difficulties such as nervousness, sadness, low self-confidence, and a lack of enthusiasm.

The health benefits of Ginger Oil are the same as that of the herb from which it originates, with the oil even being considered to be more beneficial due to its higher Gingerol content, a constituent that is most reputable for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. With a warm, sweet, woody, and spicy scent that has an energizing effect, especially when used in aromatherapy, Ginger Oil has earned the nickname “The Oil of Empowerment” for the feeling of confidence that it is known to inspire.

BENEFITS OF GINGER ESSENTIAL OIL

The main chemical constituents of Ginger Oil are Camphene, B-Phellandrene, α-Pinene, Geranial, Zingiberene, β-Bisabolene, β-Sesquiphellandrene, and Curcumene.

CAMPHENE is known to:

  • Exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties
  • Be soothing

B-PHELLANDRENE is known to:

  • Exhibit a pleasant odor that has been described as peppery, minty, and/or slightly citrusy
  • Exhibit anti-septic, antiviral, bactericidal, and decongestant properties

PINENE is known to:

  • Have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and expectorant properties
  • Be a bronchodilator

GERANIAL is known to:

  • Be a fragrance ingredient with a Rose-like scent
  • Have insecticidal and anti-oxidant effects

ZINGIBERENE is known to:

  • Be the fragrance ingredient responsible for the characteristic scent of Ginger
  • Exhibit anti-viral, anti-oxidant, and antiseptic properties

Β-BISABOLENE is known to:

  • Be a fragrance agent
  • Exude a warm, woody, and fruity scent characteristic of “oriental” aromas
  • Exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-allergy properties

Β-SESQUIPHELLANDRENE is known to:

  • Have anti-viral, carminative, and stomachic properties

CURCUMENE is known to:

  • Have hypotensive and analgesic effects
  • Exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties

Used in aromatherapy applications, Ginger Oil is known for its stimulating and warming effects, which can enhance concentration while soothing and reduce the feelings of stress, sadness, anxiety, lethargy, agitation, dizziness, and fatigue.

Used cosmetically or topically in general, Ginger Essential Oil can soothe redness and eliminate bacteria, especially redness and bacteria associated with acne. Its antioxidant properties are known to have a protective effect on the skin, inhibiting the signs of skin damage and aging, such as wrinkles and fine lines. Its stimulating properties make it an ideal ingredient in revitalizing moisturizers that restore color and radiance to a dull complexion. Used in hair, Ginger Oil’s rich mineral content contributes to the health of the scalp and the strands, while its antiseptic, anti-fungal and anti-inflammatory properties contribute their cleanliness while soothing dryness and itchiness characteristic of dandruff. By stimulating and improving circulation, it is known to enhance healthier hair growth.

Ginger_EO_CaptionImage

Used medicinally, Ginger Essential Oil’s detoxifying and digestive properties facilitate the elimination of toxins and boost digestion. Additionally, it eases discomforts associated with the stomach and bowel, including flatulence, diarrhea, spasms, dyspepsia, stomach ache, and colic. For those with the intention of gaining weight, Ginger Oil is known to enhance the appetite. Its expectorant property works to eliminate mucus from the respiratory tract and to effectively reduce symptoms of respiratory ailments, including breathlessness, asthma, cough, cold, flu, and bronchitis. When massaged into the muscles, Ginger Oil’s analgesic property is known to soothe and reduce aches as well as inflammation, thus benefitting complaints such as headaches, migraines, arthritis, back pain, and contractions of the uterus, which are commonly referred to as menstrual cramps.

Ginger Oil is reputed to have many therapeutic properties. The following highlights its many benefits and the kinds of activity it is believed to show:

    • COSMETIC: Tonic, Stimulant, Warming, Anti-Inflammatory, Firming
    • ODOROUS: Tonic, Stimulant, Warming, Expectorant, Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory, Aphrodisiac, Memory-Enhancing, Soothing, Anti-Nausea, Appetite-Boosting, Immune-Boosting
  • MEDICINAL: Antiseptic, Laxative, Tonic, Stimulant, Warming, Digestive, Carminative, Expectorant, Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory, Antispasmodic, Soothing, Anti-nausea, Appetite-Boosting, Circulatory, Diuretic, Detoxifying, Immune-Boosting, Sudorific

GINGER ESSENTIAL OIL USES

Used in aromatherapy applications, diffusing 2-3 drops of Ginger Oil in a diffuser of personal preference can improve a negative mood and low libido. By facilitating the onset of sleep and improving sleep quality, diffusing Ginger Oil is known to benefit those suffering from insomnia. It is also believed to enhance energy levels by inspiring positive and hopeful feelings and promoting a balanced and grounded mindset.

For a calming and heartening diffuser blend with a tropical nuance that releases anxiety, fatigue, and sadness, combine and diffuse 3 drops Ginger Essential Oil, 2 drops Ylang Ylang Essential Oil, and 2 drops Wild Orange Essential Oil.

For a diffuser blend that is reputed to enhance the feeling of self-empowerment, combine and diffuse 3 drops Ginger Essential Oil, 2 drops Bergamot Essential Oil, and 2 drops Patchouli Essential Oil. This blend is also known to create a sense of mental and emotional balance. For a blend that eases the mind and lifts the spirit, combine and diffuse 2 drops each of Ginger, Geranium, and Orange essential oils.

For a diffuser blend that eases congestion and irritation of the respiratory tract by reducing mucus and inflammation, simply combine 2 drops each of the following essential oils before adding the mixture to a diffuser, based on the amount indicated by the diffuser: Ginger, Tea Tree, Sage, and Eucalyptus. This blend also eases stress, balances the hormones, and alleviates symptoms of allergies. To soothe nausea and an upset stomach, blend and diffuse 3 drops Ginger Essential Oil, 3 drops Grapefruit Essential Oil, and 2 drops Peppermint Essential Oil.

Ginger Essential Oil blends well with any of the following oils, contributing to scent combinations that are aromatically appealing: Bergamot, Cassia, Cedarwood Atlas, Cinnamon, Coriander, Eucalyptus, Frankincense, Geranium, Juniper Berry, Lemon, Lime, Myrtle, Neroli, Orange, Palmarosa, Patchouli, Rose, Rosemary, Rosewood, Sandalwood, Vetiver, and Ylang Ylang.

Used in cosmetic applications, Ginger Essential Oil is known to inhibit cellular oxidation that is responsible for skin damage and signs of aging. For a facial scrub that reveals a softer, healthier layer of skin by removing dead and dull skin, combine ½ cup Brown Sugar, ½ cup Fractionated Coconut Carrier Oil, 10 drops Ginger Essential Oil, and 5 drops Lime Essential Oil in a bowl, then transfer the mixture to an airtight container. To use this Ginger Oil-infused facial exfoliant, with the fingertips scoop a small amount into the hands and gently massage it into the face until the sugar softens. Rinse off the scrub with warm water and pat the skin dry with a soft, clean towel. This scrub is known to soothe inflammation, such as that associated with acne, and to smooth the look of fine lines. For a scrub that diminishes the appearance of cellulite, an exfoliating mixture can be made by using the aforementioned recipe and replacing the Brown Sugar with ¼ cup Coffee Powder and ¼ cup Cocoa Powder.

To create a toning and nourishing face mask with softening, illuminating, and even aphrodisiac qualities, thoroughly combine 5 drops Ginger Essential Oil, 2 Tbsp. Raw Organic Honey, and 1 Tsp. Lemon Juice, then refrigerate the mixture for 30 minutes. Apply this blend to the face like a mask and leave it on for 30 minutes before rinsing it off with cool water. This mask is known to have a rejuvenating effect on the complexion.

To naturally and effectively sooth a scalp afflicted with dandruff, 2 drops of Ginger Essential Oil can be added to a regular shampoo. For an anti-dandruff Ginger Oil hair mask, combine 10 drops Ginger Essential Oil, 5 drops Extra Virgin Olive Carrier Oil and 1 tsp. Lemon Juice. Massage this anti-septic hair blend into the scalp and leave it on for 15-30 minutes before rinsing it out with a regular mild shampoo. This treatment can be repeated three times a week to prevent a dry and itchy scalp and to stimulate hair growth.

For a hair mask that stimulates hair growth by boosting circulation to the scalp, combine 10 drops Ginger Essential Oil and 10 drops Jojoba Carrier Oil in a small bowl. In circular motions, massage this blend into the scalp and leave it on for a minimum of 30 minutes, before rinsing it off in the shower and shampooing the hair as usual. This mask will not only inhibit the thinning and loss of hair, but it will also nourish the strands with fatty acids, thereby stimulating hair growth.

Used in medicinal applications, Ginger Oil eliminates bacterial infections on the skin with its antiseptic property. To avert or treat topical infections, dilute 1-3 drops of Ginger Essential Oil in 1 tsp. of Coconut Carrier Oil – or any other carrier oil of personal preference – and gently massage it into the affected area.

To soothe sore muscles, headaches, backaches, and menstrual cramps, simply dilute 2-3 drops of Ginger Essential Oil in a bathtub filled with water that is comfortably warm rather than hot, as the oil itself has warming properties. Soak in this Ginger Oil-infused bath until the water cools. This also alleviates inflammation while soothing the digestive system to enhance its function. For a bath blend that is reputed to promote an overall sense of well-being, dilute 3 drops Ginger Essential Oil and 2 drops Cardamom Essential Oil.

For a massage blend that soothes aches, in a dark bottle mix 5 drops Ginger Essential Oil, 5 drops Orange Essential Oil, and 5 drops Jojoba Carrier Oil. Cap the bottle and gently shake it to thoroughly combine all the ingredients before applying it as any massage oil. For a more complex blend that can be used in both a hot bath and a massage, combine 4 drops Ginger Essential Oil, 4 drops Rosemary Essential Oil, 2 drops Eucalyptus Essential Oil and 4 Tsp. a carrier oil of personal preference.

A GUIDE TO GINGER OIL VARIETIES & THEIR BENEFITS

GINGER ORGANIC ESSENTIAL OIL / GINGER ROOT ESSENTIAL OIL (DRIED) / GINGER ROOT ESSENTIAL OIL (FRESH)

Botanical Name: Zingiber officinale

Method of Extraction and Plant Part: Steam Distillation; the Ginger root is macerated and distilled over high heat, from which the oil is extracted.

Country of Origin: Sri Lanka / China / Indonesia

Believed to:

    • Ease nausea, menstrual discomfort, upset stomach, anxiety, muscle soreness, and joint pain
    • Even out skin tone and enhance skin elasticity
    • Have a warming and stimulating effect on the skin and mind
    • Exhibit anti-septic and anti-inflammatory properties
    • Display tonic, laxative, digestive, and anti-spasmodic activity
    • Reduce or eliminate mucus from the respiratory tract to soothe irritation and congestion
    • Promote easier breathing by opening up airways and diminishing inflammation
    • Reduce symptoms of colds, flu, and fever
    • Enhance libido by arousing sensuality, calmness, and confidence
    • Replace negative emotions such as stress, fatigue, and sadness with enthusiastic energy
    • Boost circulation and thereby stimulate the growth of stronger and healthier hair and skin
    • Facilitate the fading of scars and cellulite
  • Promote a smooth, clear, and radiant complexion

CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR GINGER OIL

Ginger Essential Oil is for external use only. It is imperative to consult a medical practitioner before using this oil for therapeutic purposes. Pregnant and nursing women are especially advised not to use Ginger Oil without the medical advice of a physician, as it may have an effect on certain hormone secretions and it is unclear whether these effects are transferable to babies at these stages of development. The oil should always be stored in an area that is inaccessible to children, especially those under the age of 7.

Those with the following health conditions are recommended to be advised by a physician: diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure and other heart-related ailments, skin disorders, liver damage, or hormone-related ailments. Individuals that are taking prescription drugs, undergoing major surgery, or who are at a greater risk of experiencing strokes, heart attacks, or atherosclerosis are also advised to seek medical consultation prior to use.

Prior to using Ginger Oil, a skin test is recommended. This can be done by diluting 1 drop of the Essential Oil in 4 drops of a Carrier Oil and applying a dime-size amount of this blend to a small area of skin that is not sensitive. Ginger Oil must never be used near the eyes, inner nose, and ears, or on any other particularly sensitive areas of skin. Potential side effects of Ginger Oil include low blood pressure. Due to the potential phototoxicity of this oil, it is recommended that the areas of the application be protected from sunlight exposure for 24 hours.

Those seeking medical care to manage moods, behaviors, or disorders should treat this essential oil as a complementary remedy rather than a replacement for any medicinal treatments or prescriptions. In the event of an allergic reaction, discontinue use of the product and see a doctor, pharmacist, or allergist immediately for a health assessment and appropriate remedial action. To prevent side effects, consult with a medical professional prior to use.

IN ESSENCE…

    • Ginger Essential Oil or Ginger Root Oil is derived from the root of the Zingiber officinale herb, better known as Ginger.
    • Ginger Essential Oil has earned the nickname “The Oil of Empowerment” for the feeling of confidence that it is known to inspire.
    • Used in aromatherapy applications, Ginger Essential Oil is stimulating and warming. It can enhance concentration and it can soothe and reduce feelings of stress, sadness, anxiety, lethargy, agitation, dizziness, and fatigue.
    • Used topically, Ginger Essential Oil soothes redness, eliminates bacteria, inhibits the signs of skin damage and aging, and restores color and radiance to a dull complexion.
    • Used in hair, Ginger Essential Oil contributes to the health and cleanliness of the scalp, soothes dryness and itchiness, and enhances healthier hair growth by stimulating and improving circulation to the scalp.
  • Used medicinally, Ginger Essential Oil facilitates the elimination of toxins, boosts digestion, eases discomforts of the stomach and bowel, enhances appetite, clears the respiratory tract, soothes aches, and reduces inflammation.

 

Energize with Peppermint Oil {Recipes}

Peppermint Essential Oil is an eminent and versatile oil that can be used on almost any part of the body for almost any ailment. The positive effects of Peppermint Oil are powerful and have beneficial impacts on interconnected body systems. It is famed for its ability to reduce pain and to stimulate, invigorate, energize, and prevent the growth of harmful bacteria. It can be used in numerous body care products ranging from skin and hair care to emotional care through aromatherapy.

USING PEPPERMINT OIL IN A DIFFUSER OR ROOM SPRAY (ENERGIZE)

When used in aromatherapy, Peppermint Essential Oil’s expectorant properties clear the nasal passageway to promote the relief of congestion and to encourage easy breathing. It is believed to stimulate circulation, reduce feelings of nervous tension, soothe feelings of irritability, boost energy, balance hormones, and enhance mental focus. The scent of this analgesic oil is believed to help relieve headaches, and its stomachic properties are known to help suppress the appetite and promote the feeling of being full. When diluted and inhaled, this digestive oil can reduce the feeling of nausea.

  1. PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL ROOM SPRAY BLEND FOR ALERTNESS
Ingredient Amount
Peppermint Essential Oil 85 drops
Ginger Essential Oil 40 drops
Grapefruit Essential Oil 35 drops
Sweet Basil Essential Oil 15 drops
Pure Water 120 ml / 4 oz.

Instructions

  1. Mix all essential oils together in a spray bottle.
  2. Add water.
  3. Shake again.
  4. Spritz whenever you need a boost of energy.
  5. For best results, spray the room mist above your head 10 times. After every 2 or 3 sprays, close your eyes to avoid irritation and deeply inhale the scent to relax and feel rejuvenated.

PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL DIFFUSER BLEND FOR INCREASED FOCUS

Ingredient Amount
Peppermint Essential Oil 2 drops
Cinnamon Essential Oil 2 drops
Rosemary Essential Oil 1 drop

Instructions

  1. For optimal blending before adding to an electric diffuser, add all oils to a 2-mL glass bottle and roll bottle between hands.
  2. Based on manufacturer’s instructions, add the appropriate number of drops to your diffuser.

 

  1. PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL DIFFUSER BLEND FOR COOLING DOWN
Ingredient Amount
Peppermint Essential Oil 4 drops
Spearmint Essential Oil 4 drops
Citronella Essential Oil 4 drops
Lemongrass Essential Oil 1 drop

Instructions

  1. For optimal blending before adding to an electric diffuser, add all oils to a 2-mL glass bottle and roll bottle between hands.
  2. Based on manufacturer’s instructions, add the appropriate number of drops to your diffuser.

USING PEPPERMINT OIL IN A MASSAGE (RELIEVE FATIGUE)

When used in a massage, Peppermint Essential Oil has been found to eliminate harmful bacteria from the skin, to relieve muscle spasms and flatulence, to disinfect and soothe inflamed skin, and to release muscle tension. When diluted with a carrier oil and rubbed into the feet, it can work as a natural fever reducer. It can effectively decrease feelings of fatigue caused by strenuous physical or mental work, stress, or a lack of restful sleep.

  1. PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL MASSAGE BLEND FOR FATIGUE RELIEF
Ingredient Amount
Peppermint Essential Oil 6 drops
Rosemary Essential Oil 5 drops
Grapefruit Essential Oil 4 drops
Carrier Oil 1 tbsp (15 ml)

Instructions

  1. Measure out the carrier oil in a container.
  2. Slowly add in the essential oils.
  3. Pour the massage oil into a dark bottle and shake well to combine.
  4. Massage the blend into the upper chest, shoulders, back of the neck, and down the back.

 

  1. PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL MASSAGE BLEND TO UPLIFT THE MOOD
Ingredient Amount
Peppermint Essential Oil 5 drops
Thyme Essential Oil 4 drops
Grapefruit Essential Oil 4 drops
Cypress Essential Oil 2 drops
Carrier Oil 1 tbsp (15 ml)

Instructions

  1. Measure out the carrier oil in a container.
  2. Slowly add in the essential oils.
  3. Pour the massage oil into a dark bottle and shake well to combine.
  4. Massage the blend into the upper chest, shoulders, back of the neck, and down the back.

 

  1. PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL MASSAGE BLEND FOR MUSCLE SORENESS
Ingredient Amount
Peppermint Essential Oil 4 drops
Ylang Ylang Essential Oil 4 drops
Thyme Essential Oil 3 drops
Ginger Essential Oil 3 drops
Lemon Essential Oil 1 drop
Carrier Oil 1 tbsp (15 ml)

Instructions

  1. Measure out the carrier oil in a container.
  2. Slowly add in the essential oils.
  3. Pour the massage oil into a dark bottle and shake well to combine.
  4. Massage the formula into the preferred muscles.

 

  1. PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL MASSAGE BLEND FOR PHYSICAL STRENGTH
Ingredient Amount
Peppermint Essential Oil 5 drops
Melissa Essential Oil 5 drops
Palmarosa Essential Oil 5 drops
Allspice Essential Oil 5 drops
Eucalyptus Essential Oil 4 drops
Lime Essential Oil 4 drops
Ginger Essential Oil 2 drops
Grapeseed Carrier Oil 2 tbsp (30 ml / 1 fl. oz.)

Instructions

  1. Measure out the carrier oil in a container.
  2. Slowly add in the essential oils.
  3. Pour the massage oil into a dark bottle and shake well to combine.
  4. Massage the formula into the preferred muscles.

USING PEPPERMINT OIL IN A BATH (BREATHE EASY & REJUVENATE)

In a diluted bath blend, Peppermint Essential Oil is known to clear nasal passages and to relieve congestion, back pain, mental fatigue, and coughs. It boosts circulation, releases the feeling of having tired feet, muscular pain, cramps, and spasms. It soothes inflamed and itchy skin, among other conditions.

  1. PEPPERMINT BATH BLEND TO BREATH MORE EASILY
Ingredient Amount
Peppermint Essential Oil 5 drops
Cajeput Essential Oil 5 drops
Eucalyptus Essential Oil 5 drops
Epsom Salt 1 cup
Carrier Oil (Grapeseed, Sweet Almond, Hazelnut, or Sesame suggested) 1 tsp (5 ml)

Instructions:

  1. Pour Epsom Salt into a clean mixing bowl.
  2. Add Essential Oil(s). Mix well.
  3. Spoon the final product into clean jars (such as canning or jam jars).
  4. When adding the salts to a bath, ensure complete dissolution in water to avoid slipping.
  5. Depending on the size of the bathtub, use between ¼ to ½ cup of this salt blend per bath.
  6. Relax in the bath and enjoy for 30 minutes.

 

  1. PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL FOOT BATH BLEND TO REJUVENATE
Ingredient Amount
Peppermint Essential Oil 4 drops
Pine Essential Oil 4 drops
Eucalyptus Essential Oil 4 drops
Carrier Oil (Grapeseed, Sweet Almond, Hazelnut, or Sesame suggested) 1 tsp (5 ml)

Instructions

  1. Combine ingredients in a container and mix thoroughly.
  2. Transfer blend to a large container filled with 8 cups (2 L) of hot water or spa foot bath filled.
  3. Soak feet for 20 minutes.
  4. Towel dry and apply moisturizer.

USING PEPPERMINT OIL IN COSMETICS (PURIFY AND REFRESH)

Used cosmetically or topically in general, Peppermint Essential Oil acts as an astringent that closes pores and tightens the skin. It’s cooling and warming sensations make it an effective anesthetic that leaves the skin numb to pain and calms redness and inflammation. It has traditionally been used as a cooling chest rub to relieve congestion and, when diluted with a carrier oil, it can promote the safe and healthy renewal of skin, thus offering relief from skin irritations such as sunburn. In shampoos, it can stimulate and soothe the scalp while also removing dandruff.

  1. PEPPERMINT AND VANILLA BODY SCRUB TO SOFTEN AND PURIFY
Ingredient Amount
Dead Sea Salt 8 Tbsp
White Clay (or substitute with more Sea Salt) 2 Tbsp
Almond Oil (or substitute with Olive Oil) 6 Tbsp
Chopped Mint Leaves 2 Tbsp
Vanilla Bean Seeds From 1 Bean
Peppermint Essential Oil 10 drops
Lemon Essential Oil (or substitute with 1 tsp of Lemon Juice) 5 drops
Lemon Zest 1 Tsp

Instructions

  1. Mix all ingredients in a bowl.
  2. Spoon the mixture into an air-tight glass jar.
  3. This recipe makes approximately 150 ml (5 oz.) of body scrub.
  4. Soak feet for a short period of time in bathtub or basin of water to soften and prepare skin for exfoliation.
  5. With hand, scoop out some homemade scrub and put it on feet.
  6. In a circular motion, rub homemade scrub all over feet using a scrub brush, or work it in with hands for 15-30 seconds on each foot.
  7. Soak feet in water to rinse off the scrub.
  8. Lift feet out of water and dry with a towel.
  9. Apply lotion to seal in moisture.

 

  1. HOMEMADE PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL & LEMON FACE WASH
Ingredient Amount
Water 1 cup
Bar of Unscented Glycerin Soap (Chopped) 1/5 of a bar
Lemon Essential Oil 5 drops
Peppermint Essential Oil 5 drops

Instructions

  1. In a small saucepan, boil the water.
  2. Remove pan from heat and stir in glycerin soap pieces until completely dissolved.
  3. Set aside to cool completely.
  4. Once cooled, add essential oils and stir gently to mix thoroughly.
  5. Using a funnel, pour face wash into a pump bottle.
  6. Remaining face wash can be stored in a covered glass jar.

 

  1. PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL & HONEY FACIAL TONER
Ingredient Amount
Honey 1 Tbsp
Warm Water 1/3 cup (78 mL / 3 fl. oz.)
Apple Cider Vinegar ¼ cup (60 mL / 2 fl. oz.)
Water 1 cup (250 mL / 8 fl. oz.)
Peppermint Essential Oil 6-8 drops

Instructions

  1. In a small bowl, mix warm water and honey until honey completely dissolves.
  2. Stir in Water, Apple Cider Vinegar, and Peppermint Essential Oil.
  3. Using a funnel, pour face wash into a small bottle.
  4. Remaining toner can be stored in a small glass jar.
  5. For best results, use after washing face with Peppermint & Lemon Facial Wash.
  6. Apply toner to the skin using a cotton ball. Do not wash off.

 

  1. PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL LIP BALM BLEND FOR FRESH COOLNESS
Ingredient Amount
Shea Butter 1 Tsp
Vitamin E Oil 1 Tsp
Sweet Almond Oil 2 Tsp
Beeswax Pellets 2 ½ to 3 heaping tsp (or 1 ½ to 2 tsp solid Beeswax)
Peppermint Essential Oil  10 drops

Instructions

  1. In a saucepan, heat Shea Butter, oils, and Beeswax on the lowest stove-top heat setting. Heating the blend too quickly could result in a gritty lip balm.
  2. Remove blend from heat and add Peppermint Essential Oil.
  3. Pour blend into metal tins or tubes, leaving open.
  4. Allow balm to set inside containers for 24 hours, then cover.
  5. Apply to lips.

TIPS

  • If the mixture is too thin: Simply add Beeswax pellets (or tiny bits of solid Beeswax) one at a time.
  • If the mixture is too thick: A splash of Almond Oil will help reduce thickness.
  • If mixture becomes too thick after adding Peppermint Oil (this may happen, as Peppermint EO is colder): Simply heat mixture VERY slowly over low heat until it liquefies.
  • If saucepan doesn’t pour well, use a dropper to fill lip balm containers.

 

  1. HOMEMADE PEPPERMINT SHAMPOO BLEND TO STIMULATE THE SCALP
Ingredient Amount
Coconut Milk (Homemade or Canned) ¼ cup (60 mL / 2 fl. oz.)
Liquid Castile Soap ¼ cup (60 mL / 2 fl. oz.)
Peppermint Essential Oil 20 drops
Olive or Almond Oil (Optional – for dry hair) ½ tsp

Instructions

  1. In an empty shampoo bottle, jar, or pump soap dispenser, combine all ingredients.
  2. Shake well to mix thoroughly.
  3. Keep in the shower for up to a month.
  4. Shake before each use.
  5. Use approximately 1 teaspoon every time you shampoo.

IN ESSENCE…

    • When diffused, Peppermint Essential Oil can boost energy, clear the respiratory tract, stimulate circulation, alleviate feelings of nervous tension and stress, and soothe feelings of irritability.
    • In a massage, Peppermint Essential Oil relieves fatigue, muscle spasms, muscle tension, flatulence, and fever. It is known to disinfect and soothe inflamed skin.
    • In a bath, Peppermint Essential Oil boosts circulation, releases the feeling of tiredness, and soothes itchy skin.
  • In cosmetics, Peppermint Essential Oil brightens, clears, and tones the skin, hydrates a dry scalp and promotes hair health and growth.

Benefits and Use of Peppermint Oil

Mentha piperita, or Peppermint as it is commonly known, is a perennial herb native to the Mediterranean but has also been cultivated in the USA, Italy, Great Britain, and Japan. It can be identified by its serrated leaves and by its flowers that range in color from light pink to mauve, growing in a conical shape.

Peppermint essential oil has been called one of the most versatile oils in the world, sharing the title with Lavender. Abounding in dermal and oral uses as well as anti-microbial properties, there are countless issues for which it is beneficial, promoting the wellness of body, mind, and overall health. The scent of Peppermint can be described as being fresh, sharp and comparable to Menthol, and the components of this multi-purpose oil are used internationally in cosmetic, culinary, and health industries.

Extracted from the Peppermint herb, the uses of this cherished plant and its benefits have been traced back to Chinese and Japanese folk medicine practices and even Ancient Egyptian times where dried Peppermint leaves were found placed in tombs inside the pyramids. Due to the common incidence of using the name Peppermint interchangeably with the terms Mint and Spearmint, there has been confusion about its history of cultivation, but ancient textual references to it prove that it has been used for culinary purposes and in herbal medicine since 1500 BC. Peppermint is also mentioned in Greek mythology in the story of the nymph “Mentha” or “Minthe,” who is transformed into the sweet-smelling herb that releases a powerful, lingering aroma every time she is stepped on.

Peppermint is one of the hundreds of species belonging to the Mint family of plants or the Mint “genus.” Included in this genus are herbs such as Spearmint, Water Mint, and Forest Mint. Peppermint is thought to be a naturally occurring hybrid of Water Mint (M. aquatica) and Spearmint (M. spicata).

BENEFITS OF PEPPERMINT OIL

The main chemical constituents of Peppermint essential oil are Menthol, Menthone, and 1,8-Cineole, Menthyl acetate and Isovalerate, Pinene, Limonene and other constituents. The most active of these components are Menthol and Menthone. Menthol is known to be analgesic and is thus beneficial for reducing pain such as headaches, muscle aches, and inflammation. Menthone is known to be analgesic as well, but it is also believed to show antiseptic activity. Its invigorating properties lend the oil its energizing effects.

Used medicinally, Peppermint essential oil has been found to eliminate harmful bacteria, relieve muscle spasms and flatulence, disinfect and soothe inflamed skin, and to release muscle tension when used in a massage. When diluted with a carrier oil and rubbed into the feet, it can work as a natural effective fever reducer.

Used cosmetically or topically in general, Peppermint acts as an astringent that closes pores and tightens the skin. It’s cooling and warming sensations make it an effective anesthetic that leaves the skin numb to pain and calms redness and inflammation. It has traditionally been used as a cooling chest rub to relieve congestion, and when diluted with a carrier oil such as coconut, it can promote the safe and healthy renewal of skin, thus offering relief from skin irritations such as sunburn. In shampoos, it can stimulate the scalp while also removing dandruff.

When used in aromatherapy, Peppermint essential oil’s expectorant properties clear the nasal passageway to promote the relief of congestion and to encourage easy breathing. It is believed to stimulate circulation, reduce feelings of nervous tension, soothe feelings of irritability, boost energy, balance hormones, and enhance mental focus. The scent of this analgesic oil is believed to help relieve headaches, and its stomachic properties are known to help suppress the appetite and promote the feeling of being full. When diluted and inhaled or when rubbed in small amounts behind the ear, this digestive oil can reduce the feeling of nausea.

Due to its anti-microbial properties, Peppermint oil can also be used as a cleaning solvent to sanitize and deodorize the environment, leaving behind the trail of a fresh, cheerful scent. Not only will it disinfect surfaces, but it will also eliminate bugs in the home and function as an effective insect repellant.

Peppermint essential oil is reputed to have many therapeutic properties.

COSMETIC:
Antiseptic, astringent, cordial, nervine, sudorific.

ODOROUS:
Analgesic, cephalic, cordial, decongestant, digestive, emmenagogue, expectorant, nervine, stimulant.

MEDICINAL:
Analgesic, anesthetic, anti-galactagogue, anti-phlogistic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, cordial, decongestant, digestive, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hepatic, nervine, stimulant, stomachic, sudorific, vasoconstrictor, vermifuge.

CULTIVATING AND HARVESTING QUALITY PEPPERMINT OIL

Due to its need for water, Peppermint flourishes in cool or temperate regions that are wet such as near streams or in areas with plenty of rainfall, though adequate drainage is also required. In order to produce the ideal balance of oil compounds during the growing phase, the best growing conditions would consist of warm or hot days followed by cool nights. When grown in warm climates, Peppermint can grow in partial shade or full sun. When harvested in the sun, it will be higher in oil content; however, if the growing conditions are too warm, especially at night, less desirable compounds such as highly toxic Menthofuran will form.

When 10% of the Peppermint crop is in the flowering stage, it produces the optimum oil and Menthol yield and quality. When all traces of dew disappear on a dry, sunny day, harvesting can begin. The whole Peppermint plant is cut down with the aid of conventional hay mowers. If the stems become fractured or if the leaves break, there will be lower oil yields and this will prevent the regrowth of the plants. For this reason, it is important to cut the plant neatly. A more economical oil extraction is achieved through lower moisture content, so once the Peppermint is cut, it is left in the field to wilt. Afterward, it is sliced with a forage harvester into a mobile distillation pot, tub, or trailer in which it is transported to the facility for distillation.

Despite the ideal wilting conditions, Peppermint will still lose essential oil from lying in rows of dry leaves or in heaps for any amount of time. If the Peppermint is not checked, the quality and quantity of the oil could be compromised by fermentation – that is, the chemical breakdown of the Peppermint by microorganisms. In order to prevent this, some producers distill the fresh Peppermint as soon as it is cut.

HOW IS PEPPERMINT OIL EXTRACTED?

The essential oils of Peppermint are found in cells on the underside of the leaves and are collected through the process of steam distilling the fresh or partially dried plant leaves.

As with all other essential oils, Peppermint will retain stability and have a prolonged shelf life if stored in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight with the bottle cap tightly closed.

USES OF PEPPERMINT OIL

In a diffuser, Peppermint oil can help to enhance relaxation, concentration, memory, energy, and wakefulness.

When used topically in homemade moisturizers, the cooling and calming effects of Peppermint essential oil can relieve sore muscles. Historically, it has been used to reduce itchiness and the discomfort of inflammation, headaches, and joint pains. It can also be used to relieve the sting of sunburns.

In a diluted massage blend or bath, Peppermint essential oil is known to relieve back pain, mental fatigue, and coughs. It boosts circulation, releases the feeling of having tired feet, relieves muscular pain, cramps, and spasms, and soothes inflamed, itchy skin among other conditions.

Well-known for its anti-microbial and anti-fungal qualities, a few drops of the oil can be added to homemade spray cleaners and spritzed on areas that are particularly in need of anti-bacterial care, such as bathrooms and kitchens. Peppermint makes an effective and natural deterrent to house pests and insects.

A GUIDE TO PEPPERMINT OIL VARIETIES & THEIR BENEFITS

 

PEPPERMINT VARIETY & BOTANICAL NAME COUNTRY OF ORIGIN BENEFITS OF OIL
Peppermint Japanese 
(also called Cornmint)Mentha arvensis
Found in:

  • India
Believed to:

  • have the dual action of warming and cooling
  • relieve itching, inflammation, sunburn and muscle aches
  • soften skin
  • aid treatment of greasy hair/skin
Peppermint Supreme
(also called Peppermint English, Candy Mint, Mitcham Peppermint, and Black MitchamMentha piperita
Found in:

  • England (specifically, an area in Surrey called Mitcham)
  • India
Believed to:

  • relieve headaches
  • relieve mild coughing
  • focus the mind
  • improve memory

 

CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR PEPPERMINT OIL

As per NAHA guidelines, we do not recommend the ingestion of essential oils. In low dilutions, this oil is non-toxic and thus does not irritate the skin; however, its Menthol content can potentially cause irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. It should never be used around the eyes, inner ears, and any sensitive areas. Due to its stimulant properties, using Peppermint oil daily could interfere with sleep patterns.

The following symptoms can also be the result of overdose: skin rashes, urinary problems, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, slow or rapid breathing, convulsions, depression, and in severe cases, unconsciousness.

As is the case with all essential oils, it is imperative to consult a medical practitioner before using Peppermint essential oil for therapeutic purposes. Pregnant and nursing women are especially advised not to use Peppermint essential oil without the medical advice of a physician, and the oil should always be stored in an area that is inaccessible to children, especially those under the age of seven.

IN ESSENCE…

    • Peppermint belongs to the Mint family with Spearmint, Water Mint, and Forest Mint and is a naturally occurring hybrid of Water Mint and Spearmint.
    • Peppermint essential oil is multi-purpose, earning the reputation of being one of the most versatile oils in the world along with Lavender oil.
    • The most active components of Peppermint essential oil are Menthol and Menthone, which are known to reduce pain and to invigorate, energize, and prevent the growth of harmful bacteria, respectively.
    • There are numerous applications for which Peppermint essential oil can be used, including cosmetics, aromatherapy, relaxing baths, and as a cleaning agent around the house.
  • Due to its stimulant properties, using Peppermint essential oil daily could interfere with sleep patterns, and an overdose of the oil can lead to potentially severe side effects.