Top 10 Best-Selling Fragrance Oils of 2019

WHAT IS FRAGRANCE OIL USED FOR?

Fragrance Oils are the scented oils that are created to be added to products such as scented candles, household cleaners, room sprays, air fresheners, and vaporizers in order to give them pleasant, distinctive aromas or to enable them to diffuse pleasant aromas. Fragrance Oils that are body-safe can also be added to cosmetics, soaps, shampoos, perfumes, and other products that make contact with the skin and hair.

Virtually all fragrances, natural or manmade, in an environment can be imitated in a laboratory, and there are limitless variations of oil groupings that can synthetically produce each of these countless scents. Fragrance Oils may be composed of one to two Essential Oils while others may have many more, and although combining the same combination of oils will repeatedly produce the same scent, simply adjusting the percentage of each oil could alter the final scent considerably, creating one that is completely original compared to previous iterations.

HOW ARE FRAGRANCE OILS MADE?

In a careful process, fragrance designers develop each Fragrance Oil by selecting the Essential Oils or other aromatic chemical compounds that blend well together and then by determining the ideal amount of each oil for the particular theme that is intended to be captured for the resultant blend. To illustrate, for a scent inspired by the feeling of spending a sunny summer day at the beach, the ideal aromatic compounds would likely have light, refreshing, and uplifting qualities.

Some of the ingredients – both artificial and naturally-derived – that commonly go into the production of Fragrance Oils include Absolutes, Alcohols, Aldehydes, Carrier Oils, Essential Oils, Esters, and Resins. Though some Fragrance Oils might not necessarily be entirely natural or volatile, they can still have the ability to uphold the same quality as Essential Oils and can sometimes exude stronger longer-lasting aromas. Fragrance Oils can be either 100% synthetic or they can be comprised of up to 80% Essential Oils.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A FRAGRANCE OIL AND AN ESSENTIAL OIL?

Although the term Fragrance Oil is sometimes understood to be a substitute for the term Essential Oil, there are several differences between these two distinctly different types of oils even if they can both be applied similarly:

ESSENTIAL OILS FRAGRANCE OILS
Natural and pure Sometimes manufactured with natural aromatic components and other times manufactured with chemical components (not entirely pure)
Derived from various plant parts, including roots, leaves, herbs, grass, flowers, and resins Could be composed of either several natural oils or of artificial/synthetic aromatic compounds
Retains the authentic essence/aroma and beneficial properties of the plant Replicates Essential Oil scents; numerous scents are combined to produce a new, unique scent
Examples of Essential Oils: Lavender, Lemon, Peppermint, Eucalyptus Examples of Fragrance Oils: Pumpkin Patch, Christmas Eve, Bubble Gum, Sun and Sand, Dragon’s Blood
Traditionally used in aromatherapy for therapeutic properties Not commonly used in aromatherapy, due to the absence of therapeutic properties
Reputed to have various health benefits Not known to have any health benefits
Can be used in scented candles, household cleaners, room sprays, air fresheners, vaporizers, cosmetics, detergents, perfumes, soaps, etc. Can be used in scented candles, household cleaners, room sprays, air fresheners, vaporizers, cosmetics, detergents, perfumes, soaps, etc.
Pricing depends on the source botanical as well as the extraction method Compared to Essential Oils, pricing is typically less expensive
Quality, scent, appearance, and potency of the oil depends on the quality of growing conditions of the crop from which it is derived; inconsistencies are possible from batch to batch Quality, scent, appearance, and potency of oil remain consistent

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF FRAGRANCE OILS?

Similar to their Essential Oil counterparts, Fragrance Oils contribute pleasant scents to products and often conjure positive memories or trigger positive associations with their scents. Furthermore, they capture unique as well as everyday scents that cannot be found in nature. Through a blend of various aromatic compounds, they are able to synthesize scents that are human-made, such as the aromas of foods, both the naturally aromatic foods as well as the odorless ones. Unlike Essential Oils, only Fragrance Oils can offer the scents of an ocean breeze, baby powder, tomatoes, mountain rain, or clean laundry.

TOP 10 BEST-SELLING FRAGRANCE OILS IN 2019

1. Coconut Paradise Fragrance Oil: The crisp, refreshing aroma of this oil is reminiscent of the tropics, summer, and youth. Creamy top notes of Coconut blend intricately with the scents of Peaches, Vanilla, and base notes of rich butter.

2. Amber Romance Type Fragrance Oil: This warm, sensual, haunting aroma exudes nuances of Vanilla, Sandalwood, Patchouli, and Blackberry, which blend with Musk at the base for a rounded, romantic scent.

3. French Lavender Fragrance Oil: This scent is reminiscent of a lovely, fragrant bouquet of Lavender flowers picked fresh from the French countryside. Its floral and herbaceous qualities combined with its balsamic, woody undertone are reputed to produce a peaceful, soothing, and grounding effect.

4. Tahitian Vanilla Fragrance Oil: The warm quality of this multifaceted and exotic fragrance gives it a mysterious, sultry, and seductive element. Its luxurious, creamy nuances are trailed by a hint of heavenly tropical flowers.

5. Lavender Fragrance Oil: This sweet-smelling scent is reminiscent of a walk in a Lavender field. Base notes of soft, mild French Lavender give this oil a soothing quality. This scent is often considered to be classic and timeless.

6. Ruby Grapefruit Fragrance Oil: The juicy quality of this scent is mouth-wateringly refreshing. With top notes of Pink Grapefruit, Lemon, and Lime that melds into notes of Gardenia, Lilac, powder, and Vanilla, this scent is light as well as playful.

7. Coconut Cream Fragrance Oil: Delicious, sweet, and creamy, this fragrance exudes buttery top notes with nuances of sweet burnt sugar, Cinnamon, and Peach at its heart. Base notes of Coconut, Vanilla, and powder give it an exotic quality.

8. French Vanilla Fragrance Oil: This sweet, creamy fragrance has buttery top notes with nuances of Coconut and heart notes of sweet, burnt Coconut. Base notes of Vanilla and powder help to round it out.

9. Japanese Cherry Blossom Fragrance Oil: The light, sweet, and refreshing scent of this oil is reminiscent of spring air. Fused with top notes of Asian Pears, Rose, Mimosa petals, and Fuji Apples, it is further enhanced with seductive notes of Jasmine and Peony, which accentuate the floral notes. A combination of Vanilla, Musk, and creamy Sandalwood base notes help to round out this fragrance.

10. Vanilla Fragrance Oil: The classic, rich, creamy Vanilla scent of this oil is associated with calmness, warmth, softness, and purity. Vanilla scents are often reminiscent of desserts and positive memories linked to holidays.

WHAT CAN I DO WITH FRAGRANCE OILS?

  • Create a scented candle
  • Create a unique perfume/cologne
  • Create a natural room spray/air freshener by diluting the Fragrance Oil in a spray bottle of water
  • Give a new scent to or refresh the scent of old potpourri, car air fresheners, artificial plants, real live odorless flowers, and fabrics with stale odors
  • Soak a cotton ball and leave it to lightly diffuse in areas that can benefit from freshening, such as behind garbage bins, under car seats, and inside gym bags, purses, or shoes
  • Dab a small amount on letters, gift wrapping, or wooden jewelry to add a romantic touch
  • Dab a small amount on wooden or fabric furniture
  • Diffuse during spiritual practices, such as meditation or prayer
  • Pour some down a foul-smelling drain and allow it to sit overnight
  • Create scented soaps (use only skin-safe FOs)
  • Create scented massage oils (use only skin-safe FOs)
  • Add to a regular, unscented lotion (use only skin-safe FOs)
  • Create a unique personal roll-on scent (use only skin-safe FOs)
  • Create a comforting scented bath (use only skin-safe FOs)
  • Add it to the wash during the rinse cycle (use only skin-safe FOs)

For more information about using Fragrance Oils to make scented candles, check out the How to Make Candles article.

CAN I PUT FRAGRANCE OIL IN A DIFFUSER?

Because Fragrance Oils are highly flammable and thus pose a safety hazard when heated without dilution, it is highly recommended that the intended use be matched to an IFRA product type/category. For this, page 23 of the IFRA Information Booklet can be a helpful resource. Once the category for the intended use has been determined, it is advisable to check the particular Fragrance Oil’s maximum dilution rate as well as the product’s flash point.

CAN FRAGRANCE OILS BE USED ON SKIN?

It is imperative to ensure that Fragrance Oils are skin-safe before they are incorporated into recipes for cosmetic products. For more information about adding Fragrance Oils to moisturizers, check out the post titled How to Make a Natural Moisturizer.

FRAGRANCE OILS SIDE EFFECTS

Fragrance Oils are for external use only. It is imperative to consult a medical practitioner before using these oils for therapeutic purposes. Pregnant and nursing women are especially advised not to use Fragrance Oils without the medical advice of a physician, as they may have effects on certain hormone secretions and it is unclear whether these effects are transferable to babies at these stages of development. These oils should always be stored in an area that is inaccessible to children, especially those under the age of 7.

Those with the following health conditions are especially recommended to be advised by a physician: cancer, heart-related ailments, skin disorders or allergies, hormone-related ailments, or epilepsy. Individuals that are taking prescription drugs, undergoing major surgery, or who are at a greater risk of experiencing strokes, heart attacks, or atherosclerosis are also advised to seek medical consultation prior to use.

Prior to using any Fragrance Oil, a skin test is recommended. This can be done by diluting 1 drop of the Fragrance Oil in 4 drops of a Carrier Oil and applying a dime-size amount of this blend to a small area of skin that is not sensitive. Fragrance Oils must never be used near the eyes, inner nose, and ears, or on any other particularly sensitive areas of skin. Potential side effects of Fragrance Oils, especially with long-term exposure and improper handling, include difficulty breathing, coughing, nausea, cramps, vomiting, headache, rashes, itching, chafing, a burning sensation on the skin or in the stomach, cancer, lung and/or heart disease, and brain damage. In the event of an allergic reaction, discontinue use of the products and see a doctor, pharmacist, or allergist immediately for a health assessment and appropriate remedial action. To prevent side effects, consult with a medical professional prior to use.

Essential Oils and Flower Essences

Essential oils and flower essences bestow a concentrated dose of plant energy.
In most cases, however, you may want to work with the whole plant. You may find that if you wish to work with a particular plant, you’re obligated to grow it yourself. This may be for a variety of reasons.
* Some plants are rare in an area. You may need to nurture some indoors or order from a specialist nursery.
* What you desire may not be marketable: the alchemists treasured fresh morning dew caught upon the leaves of lady’s mantle. They called it “water from heaven” and prized it as an ingredient in many enchanted potions. If you want some {and you very well might; it’s reputed to provide a beautiful complexion!}, you’ll have to grow it and gather it yourself.
* In some cases, it’s best to have your own fresh stock of plants, to save on expense and safety. Your own roses are not only more powerful than the florists, but you’ll save a small fortune and, as you place the petals in your bath, you also have the assurance of knowing no toxic pesticides and preservatives taint them and potentially you.
* In the case of root charms, often the only way to guarantee that you have the genuine article is to actually start with the whole plant. Too many commercial preparations purporting to include items like High John the Conqueror or Adam and Eve Root contain only petroleum products.
* Unfortunately, in a growing number of cases, the only way to access a power may be to grow your own, because there isn’t any other source.

The decimation of the animal kingdom is well-known and well-publicized, but humans have done no less damage to plants. A 1998 international study conducted by sixteen organizations, including the Smithsonian Institute, indicates that at least one out of every eight known plant species on Earth is now either threatened with extinction or nearly extinct. **

Solomon’s Seal was once a very prominent magical plant, a favorite of ancient spell books and grimoires. Beth Root derives from another very endangered plant. Native to North America, aboriginal Americans prized it as a love potion. The root was boiled and then dropped into the desired man’s food; upon consumption, he should have eyes only for his enchantress. Beth Root was heartily adopted into African-American occult traditions, where it went under the name Low John the Conqueror. Only a few decades ago, Low John was a common Hoodoo charm, used for preserving family peace and encouraging economic prosperity. You’ll rarely find it marketed because it can’t be found in the wild anymore. If you want it, you’ll have to grow it. The magic that you perform together can be especially potent because the very existence of your ally indicates to Earth your willingness to provide healing for her as well as to provide for your own desires.
The best way to gain an ally is to be an ally.
In the past, wild-crafting, the process of collecting wild plants, has been the preferred method. Common metaphysical wisdom held that wild plants were considered to be at the peak of their powers. With the wilderness under siege and quickly disappearing, this is no longer true. Wild-crafting, with few exceptions, has become the equivalent of poaching. It is unethical to remove wild plants; from a magical perspective, whatever power they possess may backfire on you. The best way to generate your personal power is to replenish Earth and nature, not continue to deplete it. The strongest, most powerful plant allies will be the ones you nourish and nurture. They will become familiar with you, your family, your needs, and desires at the same time that you are providing for theirs.
If you are unable to do so, try to find a nursery that will grow them for you.
Flower Essences.
All those steeped in Earth wisdom have always treasured dew, rain and moisture gathered from plants. Infused with the specific power belonging to the plant, the tiny particles of liquid were also perceived as containing the perfect balance of the four elements: not only the power of water but also that of Earth, as radiated through the plant, the surrounding air, and fire from the shining sun.
The ancients were limited to the plants growing on their doorstep. You are not. The modern science of flower essences brings the power of plants from all over Earth directly to you.
The direct descendant of these botanical potions, the flower essences were first prepared in their modern form in Great Britain in the 1930’s by Dr. Edward Bach, a prominent Harley Street physician, and homeopath. Dr. Bach came to the conclusion that true complete healing was not possible if approached solely from the physical plane. Emotional and spiritual imbalances were the root of illness and dysfunction, and therefore true healing must be accessed through soul and emotion. He devoted the rest of his life, at great personal sacrifice, to developing the original flower essence remedies. Dr. Bach reported that the plants communicated directly with him, sharing their secrets with him.
Dr. Bach’s original thirty-eight remedies were almost entirely derived from British flora. Emerging during the Great Depression, the bulk of the remedies served especially to relieve confusion, despair, depression and fear. Since that time, many other flower essence practitioners have followed in Dr. Bach’s pioneering footsteps so that there is now greater access to a wider variety of botanical powers than ever before. The availability of flower essences ranges as far afield as the Australian Bush, the Sonora Desert, the Alaskan wilderness, Hawaii, California and the rainforests of Peru.
As befitting true New Age substances, many were created specifically to facilitate metaphysical and spiritual goals. There are specific essences for strengthening and accessing your magical skills, also for healing divisions between genders and building bridges to other spiritual realms.
How To Use Flower Essences.
* The most common method of use is internal. Flower essences are usually sold as concentrated stock bottles and must be further diluted in pure spring-water. The general dosage is four drops four times a day, however, instructions are available on the bottles or from the manufacturers.
* Flower essences can also be applied topically, rubbed gently onto the body. A few drops on the soles of the feet or on the thin skin between thumb and forefinger before bedtime are especially beneficial. Flower essences can also be added to massage oil or bath.
* A room spray or atmospheric cleanser can be created by adding flower essences to a spray bottle of spring-water.
* Flower essences can be used to enhance and heal the power of crystals, plants, and amulets.
Apply a few drops as needed.
Although flower essences and essential oils have confusingly similar names and are sold in very similar packages {tiny glass vials}, they are by no means identical or interchangeable.
Essential oils are actually planted extracts, with extremely potent and scientifically documented physical effects. All essential oils, for instance, are antiseptic, to varying degrees. How flower essences work remains the subject of debate, the general consensus being that they are a form of vibrational healing. Flower essences are pure water infused and charged with the plant’s energy and vibration. There is no need to kill the plant to create the essence; typically only carefully selected leaves and blossoms are used. The essences are designed to provide a bridge between the plant’s healing aura and your own. There is no direct physical effect; instead, their profound effect is felt upon the emotional and spiritual plane. They are safe for everyone’s use, children and animals included. Flower essence remedies can also be used to benefit plants and crystals.
Flower essences are created for every situation and emotional state. Good source books will bestow a sense of their scope. The Following flower essences are especially beneficial for enhancing your magickal aptitude.
Flower essences are available directly from the manufacturer and also from many health food stores and alternatively oriented pharmacies.
* Angelica {Angelica arcangelica}: enhances the ability to perceive and recognize protection and guidance from spirit beings, especially angels. It is indicated for those who feel bereft of spiritual guidance and protection and can be especially beneficial during threshold experiences.
Angel’s Trumpet {Datura candida}: provides assistance for those who would like to do psychic work but can’t quite accept the reality of psychic forces and energies.
Green Bells of Ireland {Molucella laevis}: recommended for those who feel ungrounded, those who lack a conscious heart connection to the natural world and also for those who feel unaware of, or unable to access, the light and intelligence present in nature. This remedy is intended to strengthen the connection between Earth and one’s body.
Mugwort {Artemisia vulgaris}: the single most profound essence for evoking psychic skill and perceptions, it promotes alignment with the moon, corrects imbalances in the feminine cycle and promotes greater awareness of dreams and psychic ability.
Saguaro {Cereus giganteus}: Because balance is crucial, with all this talk of Earth Mother energy, this essence enhances appreciation of the male energy that serves as protector, provider and the true partner to Earth’s feminine energy. For men, saguaro can help forge a path; for women, it helps heal losses. For both, it provides inspiration and healing. Saguaro eases a sense of alienation from one’s own parentage and spiritual traditions. Saguaro reinforces an awareness of the ancient and sacred. It provides a sense of lineage, a linking of oneself to Earth’s holy traditions.
Saint John’s Wort {Hypericum perforatum}: increases spiritual awareness and consciousness. It also has a protective capacity. As your psychic work and ability increases, as you become increasingly aware of other powers, feelings of vulnerability may arise. Saint John’s Wort provides a psychic shield, soothes fears, provide courage and security and calms the effects of disturbing dreams.
* Star Tulip {Calochorus tolmiei}: creates an aura of receptivity and enables one to tune into other energies, particularly in dreams and meditation. Star-tulip is indicated for those who feel hard and brittle, cut off from Earth and other living beings, especially for those who are unable to meditate or pray but yet feel the need. Star-tulip stimulates psychic awakening and receptivity to one’s inner voices.

* Yarrow {Achillea millefolium}: strengthens and cleanses the personal aura and provides a profound psychic shield. It is indicated for those who feel drained by exposure to toxic forces, whether physical, spiritual or human.

HOW TO MAKE A FLOWER ESSENCE

While there are a number of variations on the theme, below you’ll find a simplified two-part method for creating your own flower essence. While you might choose to add other aspects to your flower essence creation process (such as prayer, chanting, placing the bowl on the ground instead of on a table, or surrounding the dish with crystals), for safety reasons, please be sure to hit all the main points in the following directions.

PART 1: THE MOTHER ESSENCE

  1. Obtain the following tools: a medium or average-sized plain glass bowl, a large or average-sized glass jar with lid, and a small (1 ounce) glass bottle with a dropper lid. Sterilize each object by placing in cold water, gradually bringing it to a boil, and boiling for at least twenty minutes. Then dry each tool with a clean cloth.
  2. Fill the glass jar with spring water. Also, gather a bottle of brandy, a small stool or table, a large organic nontoxic leaf or bed of leaves such as lettuce or chard placed on a plate, and some garden shears.
  3. In the morning or midday, on a sunny day without a cloud in the sky, take all ingredients to a serene natural or botanical setting where the flower of your choice is growing. Place the bowl on the stool or table in a place where no shadows will fall on the bowl for 3-4 hours. Fill the bowl with the water, being careful not to allow any part of your shadow to cross over it.
  4. Shears and plate(with leaf or leaves) in hand, locate the flower you would like to make an essence from. Sit or stand comfortably near the plant as your relax and take some deep breaths. Come fully into the moment.
  5. When you feel centered, silently tune into the flower and request that she assist you with you essence creation. Honor her, respect, her, and simply be with her for a moment.
  6. As you feel intuitively guided, snip between 3-6 blossoms, allowing them to fall onto the leaf.
  7. Lovingly take the flowers to the bowl of water and, without touching them, spill them in so that they float on the surface. Place the leaf or leaves near the base of a tree.
  8. Allow the flowers to merge with the energy of the water by leaving them undisturbed for 3-4 hours.
  9. Fill the dropper bottle with brandy. With the dropper cap, add two drops of the water from the flower bowl. Snugly replace the cap.
  10. Pour the remaining water from the bowl, along with the blossoms, near the base of the flowers.

You now have what is known as “the mother essence.” This is not the essence and should not be consumed or magically employed. Rather, it is the concentrated stock for creating the flower essence, which brings us to part 2.

PART 2: THE FLOWER ESSENCE

This portion of the process may be repeated with the same mother essence until the mother essence bottle is empty, provided you use the mother essence within two years after it is created (after that, the mother essence may begin to lose its potency). You may do this anywhere that feels right: in your kitchen, near your altar, or out in nature.

  1. Sterilize an additional small bottle and dropper (as above).
  2. Fill the bottle halfway with brandy and the rest of the way with spring water.
  3. Add two drops of the mother essence.
  4. Replace the cap.

Neroli {Citrus aurantium}

Neroli essential oil is obtained from the flowers of the Seville orange trees. This essential is obtained by water distilling the orange blossoms since they are very fragile and, hence, cannot undergo the steam distillation process. The aroma of neroli essential oil has a lot of resemblance to bergamot. Neroli essential oil possesses an invigorating and typical, zesty fragrance with a sweet and flowery tinge. The flowers are usually collected manually during the period between late April and early May. Going by history, the late 17th century Duchess of Bracciano and Princess of Nerola in Italy, Anne Marie Orsini was the first to introduce the quintessence of the bitter orange tree as a fragrance to perfume her gloves and her bath. It is believed that ever since the term neroli was used to denote this essence.

It may be mentioned that the neroli essential oil is considered to be among the most valuable and pricey natural oils available in the market. While this natural oil is obtained from the aromatic white flowers of the Seville orange trees, it is one of the most expensive natural oils since several tons of flowers of this species is required to obtain just one pound of the essential oil. This essential oil possesses numerous aromatic properties and, in aromatherapy, it is used to treat as well as prevent several medical conditions. While neroli essential oil has a relaxing and soothing impact on the nervous system, its use also facilitates alleviating conditions, such as depression and fretfulness that are associated with mental stress or tension.

Neroli essential oil is rejuvenating in every sense and, hence, it is a beneficial element in several skin care products, particularly those that are meant for treating dry skin and associated problems, such as acne, dermatitis and inflamed skin conditions. In addition, neroli essential oil is also a wonderful remedy for mature skin (skin of the elderly people), stretch marks and scars. It is known to tone up the complexion of the skin as well as soften wrinkles. Neroli essential oil also has industrial use and is often used in the manufacture of colognes, perfumes, and toilet waters. Like in the instance of most other essential oils, using a little amount of neroli essential oil will sustain for a prolonged period. This natural oil obtained from the blossoms of the bitter orange tree is not only versatile in use and utility, but also blends easily with almost all other essential oils.

As aforementioned, neroli essential oil is obtained from the flowers of the bitter orange tree and is considered to be very pricey natural oil. The blossoms of the bitter orange tree are petite, whitish and highly scented. It also needs to be mentioned again that neroli essential oil is not obtained by steam distillation, but by a method is known as solvent distillation using water. This is primarily owing to the fact that the blossoms of the bitter orange trees are very fragile and cannot endure steam distillation.

The essential oil extracted from the blossoms of the bitter orange trees possesses several therapeutic properties and, hence, is used to treat a number of conditions or physical and mental disorders. This natural oil possesses sedative as well as stimulant properties that are beneficial for the nervous system. It can be used to treat most of the problems related to stress and tension having an emotional origin. In addition, neroli essential oil is widely used to treat conditions, such as heart palpitations, diminish nervous anxiety and cure insomnia or sleeplessness. Deep inhaling of the aroma of neroli essential oil as well as massaging a few drops of this natural oil blended with jojoba oil on the solar plexus helps to soothe and comfort the body and the mind. The same effect is experienced when one uses this as a natural perfume or diffuses the oil in little quantities. In fact, in aromatherapy, neroli essential oil is believed to be among the most vital aromatics while treating depression and nervousness caused by tension and anxiety.

Neroli essential oil is also considered to be one of the most beneficial oil for women, especially for the skin care of elderly women. For treating mature skin, this natural oil needs to be blended with rose Otto and clary sage oils for utmost benefits. The oil’s relaxing characteristics are passed on to the cells, which are rejuvenated. In addition, use of neroli essential oil is also useful for people having sensitive skin. Most importantly, the essential oil extracted from the blossoms of the bitter orange trees has been proved to be beneficial for the female reproductive system, especially in providing relief from menstrual cramps. When using this oil for this particular therapeutic purpose, add neroli essential oil to your bath or bring down its concentration to around 10 per cent by adding it to apricot kernel oil and massage the blended oil on the abdomen. This will help to provide relief from menstrual cramps immediately.

neroli-oilThe essential oil obtained from the flowers of the bitter orange trees possesses anti-parasitic, anti-bacterial and anti-spasmodic properties. These properties of this natural oil help it to treat intestinal problems. In order to cure intestinal disorder with neroli essential oil drop a few drops of the oil in your bath or dilute it and massage the oil on the abdomen. In addition, massaging diluted neroli essential oil on the abdomen is very useful in treating stomach problems caused by stress and mental tension.

Neroli essential oil has varied use in aromatherapy. It has been reported that the fragrance of this essential oil is effective in successfully treating conditions, such as shock and nervous depression. Use of this natural oil also helps in relaxing the body and the mind and alleviates certain conditions that may appear to be critical. Neroli essential oil is known to provide relief from several hopeless situations related to mental disorders. In aromatherapy, the essential oil extracted from the blossoms of the bitter orange trees may be used in burners and diffusers to increase the atmosphere in a room. Its use in this manner helps to bring in an air of peace and comfort.

As has been discussed earlier, neroli essential oil possesses several therapeutic properties and is, therefore, used to treat different conditions. Below is a brief account of the condition specific utilities or benefits of this natural oil that may benefit you. Just go through the list and you may find it suitable for treating some medical condition you might be enduring.

  • In case you are suffering from depression and nothing seems to be working to alleviate this pathetic condition, it is advisable that you try using neroli essential oil. Used in aromatherapy, this essential oil not only helps to cure depression but also results in a happy feeling and uplifts your mood. This attribute of neroli essential oil makes its use widespread in aromatherapy.
  • In the instance of getting a wound or a cut and the physician not being readily available for administering an anti-tetanus injection, you may apply neroli essential oil, of course in a diluted condition, on your wounds or cut. The antiseptic and anti-bacterial properties of neroli essential oil will help to shield your wounds from becoming infected and tetanus. It has been proved that the oil obtained by solvent distillation of the blooms of the bitter orange trees is effective in healing as well as protecting wounds from getting infectious. Once you have applied this oil on your wound or cut, you can afford to visit your doctor at your leisure.
  • Owing to its anti-bacterial properties, neroli essential oil is very effective in eliminating bacteria – it is also known to be bactericidal. Bacteria are responsible for certain ailments and conditions, such as typhoid, cholera, food poisoning and some specific skin disorder and using this essential oil helps to cure all such diseases and conditions.
  • Another important characteristic of neroli essential oil is that during cold climates, its usage helps to keep one warm and does not allow him/ her to catch a cold or suffer from a cough. It facilitates the body to fight against these conditions caused by infections. In addition, the oil also possesses some expectorant properties that help in checking production of excessive mucus by the body and ensures that you breathe freely and have a sound sleep even during the winter months.
  • Neroli essential oil possesses the characteristics to heal wounds by forming scars on them (cicatrizant property). It has been established that this particular feature of neroli essential oil works much more effectively compared to any other anti-mark lotion or cream. In effect, neroli essential oil forms an important ingredient of several herbal anti-mark lotions or creams. Using neroli essential oil or lotions and creams containing this oil facilitates in erasing spots, blemishes and after-marks caused by boils, acne, chickenpox and other similar conditions.
  • Use of neroli essential oil encourages the growth of new cells as well as helps to maintain the health of the existing cells in the body. In other words, using this oil on a regular basis helps one to grow bigger, more powerful and healthier.
  • The antiseptic property of neroli essential oil not only helps to disinfect the body but also makes the surroundings germ free. When taken internally, the essential oil obtained from the blossoms of the bitter orange tree helps to heal various types of contagions – including those of the kidneys, colon, prostate and the urinary tracts. In addition, this oil is also effective in curing skin infections and also protects the body from all new contagions.
  • The aroma of neroli oil helps to shoo away all types of foul body odour. While you may choose to use this oil as a body perfume, it can also be used as room fresheners or vaporizers to clean the atmosphere of all foul odours. Doing this not only helps to make the room scented, but also sterilizes the place.
  • The anti-spasmodic property of neroli essential oil is effective in treating spasms and providing relief from coughs, cramps and aches due to spasms. It also helps to cure spasmodic cholera and relax the muscles alleviating pain.
  • At the same time, neroli essential oil obtained from the bitter orange trees is also stomach and beneficial for all types of stomach disorders. Use of neroli essential oil encourages digestion as well as enhances appetite.
  • Neroli essential oil also possesses sedative properties which help it to alleviate mental disorders, such as distress, nervous anxiety, depression and anger. Using this natural oil on a regular basis helps to relax the body as well as the mind.
  • Many herbalists often recommend neroli essential oil treat colitis (inflammation of the colon), neuralgia (acute spasmodic pain caused by damage to or failure of a nerve), fat cracks and diarrhea. Moreover, use of neroli essential oil also helps in losing unwanted weight.
  • As mentioned earlier, neroli essential oil is highly beneficial for the skin. Topical application of this natural oil on the surface of the skin makes the skin smooth, protects it from all types of infections and helps to make it appear fresh and healthy adding glamour. Use of neroli essential oil facilitates in sustaining the appropriate amount of moisture in the skin and also balances the oils present in the skin.
  • The essential oil extracted from the blossoms of the bitter orange trees is responsible for maintaining the overall health of an individual. Its use ensures that the correct rate of metabolism and proper blood circulation are maintained by the body. In addition, neroli essential oil also helps to strengthen the immune system helping us to fight against various ailments.

General Properties

  • antispasmodic
  • antitoxic
  • aphrodisiac
  • sedative
  • slightly hypnotic
  • tranquilizing
  • uplifting

Blends Well With

Blends well with any essential oil but especially with citrus oils such as lemon and sweet orange

  • chamomile
  • clary sage
  • frankincense
  • geranium
  • patchouli
  • rose
  • sandalwood
  • ylang-ylang

General uses

  • aging skin
  • anorexia
  • anxiety
  • broken capillaries
  • bulimia
  • childbirth
  • colitis
  • depression
  • diarrhea
  • fatigue
  • fear
  • flatulence
  • frigidity
  • grief
  • high blood pressure
  • hysteria and panic
  • impotence
  • indigestion
  • insomnia
  • nervous dyspepsia
  • nervous tension
  • over-sensitivity
  • palpitations
  • rejuvenation
  • shock

Precaution

Neroli essential oil obtained from the aromatic flowers of the Seville orange or the bitter orange trees should never be used by patients undergoing chemotherapy for treating any type of cancer.

Hungary Water.

Rosemary reinvigorates. As the legend goes, at age seventy-two, Queen Isabel of Hungary was crippled by gout and rheumatism. Her master herbalist concocted a reviving water for her, originally only with the intent of relieving her physical pain. The water was administered in daily vigorous massage. Not only was she soon moving, dancing as well, her former beauty and youthful aura were also revived. Hungary Water has been popular ever since. The original 14th-century formula called for one-and-a-half pounds of fresh flowering rosemary tops added to one gallon of alcohol and distilled. Should you happen to have distilling equipment, you can experiment with that, but modern versions also proliferate. Here’s one formula:

1 ounce infused water of dried rosemary and vervain

4 drops essential oil of rosemary

4 drops essential oil of May Chang

2 drops essential oil of German or Hungarian chamomile

2 drops essential oil of peppermint

1 drops essential oil of neroli

8 ounces vodka or other scent-free alcohol

1-ounce orange blossom water

1- ounce rose water

  • Make the herbal infused water by placing equal proportions of dried vervain and rosemary in a metal bowl and pouring boiling water over them. Steep for 15 minutes and strain out the botanical material.
  • Blend the essential oils and add them to the vodka in an airtight bottle.
  • Next, add the infused flower waters. Shake vigorously.
  • Ideally, this beauty potion should now be allowed to mature for 6 months {giving the bottle a good shake every week} to gain full strength, however as it’s pretty hard to wait that long, give it as long as you can.

Although it lacks a historical tale to equal Hungary Water, the following bath formula can be prepared quickly and simply, perfect for when you just want to feel {and maybe appear!} a little younger. Rosemary and patchouli are both plants of profound psychic power: Both are reputed to ease the physical signs of aging as well as helping to maintain a youthful heart.

Both have powerful aromas. Adjust the formula to please your nose. You can also use this formula for bath salts, a salt scrub or body oil.

 

 

Aromatherapy Peppermint.

Menta Piperita

Peppermint (botanical name Menta Piperita) is basically a hybrid plant – a cross between the spearmint and watermint. Although the herb is native to Europe, presently it is grown across the globe. This perennial herb possesses numerous therapeutic properties that were identified and used by the Indians, Egyptians and Chinese since the ancient times. In order to avail the detoxifying attributes of the peppermint, the ancient Romans used to make wreaths with this herb and wear them as crowns during festivities. Owing to its sharp and spicy fragrance, peppermint is well accepted by most people.

The peppermint plant usually grows up to a height of 30 cm to 90 cm. The plant has smooth stems that are squares in cross section. The rhizomes or subterraneous roots of the plant are fleshy and travel far and wide while the bare roots are fibrous. The plant bears deep green leaves with reddish veins that are 4 cm to 9 cm in length and 1.5 cm to 4 cm in width. The peppermint plant bears purplish blooms that have four-lobed corolla in whorls around the stem. The plant usually blossoms between mid and late summer.

The essential oil extracted from peppermint not only has a soothing effect, but it also rejuvenates the skin and is tremendously resourceful for household use. The oil possesses a clearing aroma that is effective in fighting fatigue and, at the same time, very stimulating. Use of this essential oil enhances the capability to concentrate as well as brings clarity of thoughts and decisions. Peppermint essential oil is said to be inspiring and revitalizing.

It may be mentioned here that irrespective of the herb, all essential oils are prepared solely using the herbs or the plants. This denotes that the essential oils do not enclose any outside element, such as moisturizer, which could dilute their attributes or potency. As a result, whenever bottles containing essential oils are opened, they exude an exceptionally strong smell.

Peppermint essential oil is beneficial for people enduring headaches, asthma, cramps, fainting, colic, flatulence, nausea, and fevers. It is known to be highly effective in relieving pains associated with these conditions. This oil also has the potential to alleviate the symptoms of insomnia, distress, tension, anxiousness, lethargy and/ or vertigo (light-headedness).

The essential oil extracted from peppermint can be used in various ways. Some of the different uses of peppermint essential oil are briefly mentioned below.

Provided you have a water spritzer (a container for two different liquids or drinks), fill it up with water and add a few drops of peppermint essential oil to it. If the bottles are small, you need to add just 15 to 20 drops of the oil, while you may add 20-30 drops of oil in medium-sized bottles. Shake the mixture of oil and water thoroughly and gently spray it on your bedding, curtains and also carpets as an alternative to a room deodorizer.

Get a small pot filled with water for boiling over a stove top. Add three to five drops of peppermint essential oil to the water and inhale the aromatic vapor. While doing so, ensure that you take deep and slow breaths enabling the mixture to infuse your lungs.

In aromatherapy, peppermint can be effectively used as a massage oil to alleviate a number of conditions. However, as in the case of any essential oil, remember to dilute the peppermint essential oil blending it with any suitable carrier oil before use. In fact, the moisturizers present in carrier oils help to make the skin smooth and softer – supple to touch. As the concentration of peppermint essential oil is extremely high, only a few drops (one to three) of it need to be added to a little amount of carrier oil.

These days, there are several stores that sell ceramic oil burners meant for aromatherapy. Generally, these ceramic oil burners have the appearance of archetypal, glass milk bottles, but are smaller having a small, detachable, saucer-shaped lid, underneath which one can position a tea-candle. When you have lit the candle, replace the lid and pour in a small quantity of peppermint essential oil in the lid. As the candle will heat the oil in the lid, the sharp and spicy aroma of peppermint will infuse the air. This will help to refresh your senses.

You may also put in two to three drops of peppermint essential oil on a handkerchief and fold it before placing it under a pillow. While the delicate aroma of the oil will not be too intense for your nose, it will help in ensuring sound sleep.

As mentioned earlier, peppermint essential oil possesses numerous therapeutic properties and is, hence, used to treat a number of conditions. Its health benefits are many and some of them are briefly discussed below.

  • Since peppermint oil possesses potent antiseptic properties, it is very helpful in dental care. This oil not only helps to get rid of foul breath but also aids the gums and teeth to fight germs. Therefore, it is hardly surprising that peppermint essential oil forms an active ingredient in toothpaste. In addition, like clove oil, peppermint essential oil is highly effective in healing toothaches.
  • The essential oil extracted from peppermint is also effective in alleviating digestive problems while promoting digestion. On many occasions, people add a few drops of peppermint essential oil in a glassful of water and drink it following a meal with a view to facilitating digestion. The digestive properties of peppermint essential oil make it an excellent tonic for those enduring poor appetite. This oil also possesses carminative properties and, hence, is effective in expelling gas formed in the stomach and intestines, thereby, providing relief from flatulence and bloating. In addition, this essential oil is also useful when one is suffering from an upset stomach or motion sickness. Initial researches have established that a blend of peppermint essential oil and caraway oil can also be used to effectively treat heartburn.
  • Peppermint essential oil is also a good home remedy to cure a headache and nausea. Topical application of watered down peppermint oil on the forehead is helpful in providing relief from headaches.
  • As in the case of a majority of the essential oils, peppermint essential oil also has the aptitude to alleviate tension, depression as well as mental exhaustion. These actions of peppermint essential oil are attributed to its ability to revitalize and refresh. This oil is also helpful in providing relief from nervous anxiety and restiveness. It is also known to be an effective remedy for insomnia.
  • Peppermint essential oil is rich in menthol content and, hence, is helpful in clearing the congestion in the respiratory tract. It also possesses potent expectorant properties which help it to draw out mucus and phlegm from the lungs, providing instant, albeit provisional, relief in several respiratory problems, such as cold and cough, sinusitis, nasal congestion, bronchitis and even asthma. Owing to these actions of peppermint essential oil, it is widely used in several formulations for cold rubs. Massaging or rubbing the cold rubs enclosing peppermint essential oil on the chest helps to get rid of nasal congestion as well as blockage of the respiratory tract almost instantly.
  • The essential oil extracted from the peppermint plant also possesses analgesic properties and, hence, it can be used topically to get relief from pains and aches. Peppermint essential oil encloses calcium antagonism which is believed to facilitate in providing relief from pain. This oil also has a cooling nature, which is effective in bringing down high temperatures during fever.
  • It is important to note that peppermint essential oil is highly effectual for colonoscopy, gastroscopy, and also during double-contrast barium enema (the inducement of a barium salt suspension into the rectum and colon before taking an X-ray). In such cases, peppermint essential oil is applied intraluminally (a lumen inside the space of a tubular structure, such as an artery or intestine). Presently, scientists are studying the additional benefits of the oil’s anti-spasmodic properties.
  • Peppermint essential oil is also known to augment blood circulation throughout the body.
  • It has been found that the essential oil extracted from peppermint plant possesses the property to relax the muscles. Also, relaxing the stomach muscles helps in alleviating irritable bowel syndrome. Initial findings of several types of research have proved this action of the oil, but the scientists are yet to determine the precise manner in which it works.
  • As mentioned before, peppermint essential oil contains high amounts of menthol which is beneficial for the health of the skin. Owing to the presence of menthol, using this oil topically on the skin brings forth a cooling effect. In addition, this oil nurtures dry skin and removes the problems associated with oily skin.
  • Peppermint essential oil also helps to fortify the immune system, thereby, enhancing the body’s capability to fight against diseases. In addition, this essential oil also helps to safeguard the body against several ailments.
  • Peppermint essential oil is also extremely beneficial for our hair. It brings forth a calming effect when applied on the head and facilitates getting rid of dandruff and lice. In addition, peppermint nourishes the hair follicles and makes the hair appear glistening.
  • Although researchers are still trying to ascertain the anti-cancerous properties of peppermint essential oil, it is generally believed that this oil is helpful in treating cancer. Moreover, peppermint essential oil is said to be effective in curing tuberculosis.
  • Many herbalists recommend the use of peppermint essential oil for people suffering from urinary tract infection {UTI}. Nevertheless, it needs to be mentioned that the scientists are yet to ascertain the use of peppermint essential oil for this purpose.

General Properties:

  • antibacterial
  • antiseptic
  • antispasmodic
  • carminative
  • stimulant
  • stomachic
  • tonic

Blends Well With:

  • eucalyptus
  • juniper
  • lemon
  • rosemary
  • rosewood

General uses

  • abdominal pains
  • acne
  • anorexia nervosa
  • bites
  • bruises
  • colic
  • coughing
  • mouth thrush
  • mouth ulcers
  • nausea
  • painful menstruation
  • stings
  • stress
  • swollen gums
  • toothache

Precaution:

Although the essential oil extracted from peppermint possesses several therapeutic properties, it is said that this oil negates the efficacy of a number of homeopathic medications. Similar is the case for the essential oil derived from eucalyptus

 

Peppermint Oil: Four Surprising Utilities.

For several centuries, the oil obtained from the peppermint plant has been a vital element of several medications and there are sufficient reasons for this too. Peppermint oil is not only intense but also highly aromatic. In addition to being an established analgesic, carminative, and expectorant, peppermint oil possesses strong anti-inflammatory properties and, it is widely used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) problems like indigestion as well as stomach spasms. However, this oil is used in mild doses for these purposes. There are an increasing number of evidence indicating that peppermint oil can also be used for treating irritable bowel syndrome {IBS}.

Generally, peppermint oil has been extensively used in the form of an internal medication. However, it also offers a number of cosmetic benefits; for instance, it is especially effectual in augmenting the health of our mouth, skin, hair and nails.

Four Amazing Uses of Peppermint Oil:

Mouth care

Peppermint oil possesses antiseptic, antibacterial, and antimicrobial properties. Therefore, it effectively kills several harmful microbes that may be present in our mouth and eventually lead to tooth decay. It has been found that menthol, an active element present in peppermint oil, is effective in treating foul breath.

You may use peppermint oil to prepare an effective mouthwash. Add three to four drops of the oil to a little amount of clean purified water and gargle with this solution for anything between 30 seconds and one minute. For best results, you may add one teaspoon of baking soda to the solution as this will enhance its tooth whitening attributes.

Skincare

Individuals who want their skin to appear more youthful and healthy will find peppermint oil very beneficial. This oil is a proven astringent and possesses the ability to put off blockage of the skin pores. In fact, peppermint oil has been proven to be a very effectual natural therapy for acne. It contains elevated levels of menthol, which aids in keeping the skin cool and make the dull patches brighter. Applying peppermint oil to the face helps to cleanse the waste and dirt build-up.

A solution prepared by adding peppermint oil to water is ideal for external use on the skin all over the body. You may also add other ingredients beneficial for the health of the skin like aloe vera gel and apple cider vinegar to augment the potency of the solution.

Hair care

Many commercial shampoos and conditioners enclose peppermint oil as an active ingredient and there are important reasons for this. This oil possesses significant invigorating and regenerative actions, which may aid in alleviating scalp irritation, encourage new hair growth as well as revitalize the existing hair. In addition, application of peppermint oil to the scalp results in a cooling sensation, making the entire head feel stimulated and refreshed.

You can prepare an effective natural shampoo at home by blending peppermint oil (10 drops), olive oil (three tablespoons), baking soda (10 tablespoons), and aloe vera gel (6 ounces) with purified water (7 ounces). You can store this home-made shampoo in a bottle for use when necessary. It is much more nourishing compared to commercial shampoos and does not contain any chemicals that may deplete the natural oils from the hair.

Nail care

Many people across the world are affected by fungal nail infections like ringworm and athlete’s foot. While such problems hardly ever raise medical concerns, they definitely are cosmetic problems and may be responsible for obstinate itching and other bothersome symptoms. Since peppermint oil possesses anti-fungal attributes, it can effectively deal with fungal nail infections. Just apply peppermint oil to the infected nails once or twice every day till the problem disappears.

A Natural Antibiotic: Thyme Oil

Superbugs like methicillin – resistant Staphylococcus aureus {MRSA} are on the rise and, unfortunately, are becoming resistant to the drugs used to treat them. When faced with a microbial infection, using natural antibacterial agents may not only be more effective but also safe and risk-free.

Apart from using spices like garlic, I recommend you try essential oils derived from herbs like thyme oil. Not only do they have antibacterial properties, but they also provide a number of health benefits. Before I go into thyme oil’s antimicrobial functions, let me share some information on the essential oil.

What Is Thyme Oil?

Oil of thyme is derived from thyme, also known as Thymus vulgaris. The perennial herb, a member of the mint family, is used in aromatherapy, cooking, potpourri, mouthwashes, and elixirs, as well as added to ointments. Thyme also has a number of medicinal properties, which is due to the herb’s essential oils.

The benefits of thyme essential oil have been recognized for thousands of years in Mediterranean countries. This substance is also a common agent in Ayurveda practice. Today, among the many producers of thyme oil, France, Morocco, and Spain emerge as the primary ones.

Uses of Thyme Oil

Due to thyme oil’s antibacterial, antispasmodic, antirheumatic, expectorant, hypertensive, and calming properties, it has a long list of uses that include:

  • Home remedy – Thyme oil is used to relieve and treat problems like gout, arthritis, wounds, bites, and sores, water retention, menstrual and menopausal problems, nausea and fatigue, respiratory problems (like colds), skin conditions (oily skin and scars), athlete’s foot, hangovers, and even depression.
  • Aromatherapy oil – The oil can be used to stimulate the mind, strengthen memory and concentration, and calm the nerves.
  • Hair product – It is said that thyme oil can prevent hair loss. It is used as a treatment for the scalp and is added to shampoos and other hair products.
  • Skin product – Thyme oil can help tone aged skin and prevent acne outbreaks.
  • Mouthwashes and herbal rinses – Like peppermint, wintergreen, and eucalyptus oil, thyme oil is used to improve oral health.
  • Insecticide/insect repellent – Thyme oil can keep insects and parasites like mosquitoes, fleas, lice, and moths away.

Composition of Thyme Oil

Thyme is an example of a herb with over 300 varieties and various chemotypes, which are plants with the same appearance but have different chemical compositions. Each chemotype yields different oils with corresponding therapeutic benefits. This occurs when the plant is grown in different environments, climates, and soil.

Depending on which chemotype it is derived from, the oil of thyme produced will have a distinct chemical structure. The known chemotypes are:

  • Thymus vulgaris thymolThis chemotype has strong antiseptic activities and is 60 to 70 percent thymol. It goes by the name of “thyme” and “red thyme,” and is harvested during the fall.
  • Thymus vulgaris linalool This is the most gentle of all thyme chemotypes. Referred to as “garden thyme,” this variation has potent antiparasitic and antifungal properties and is grown at high altitudes.
  • Thymus vulgaris carvacrol– As its name suggests, this type contains the chemical constituent carvacrol. Its amount will depend on when it is harvested. When collected in the spring, it will contain 30 percent carvacrol, and 60 to 80 percent when harvested right after flowering or during the fall. T. Vulgaris carvacrol is known for its antiseptic properties.
  • Thymus vulgaris thujanol– Found only in the wild, this plant contains 50 percent thuja oil and is known for its beneficial effects on the immune system and hormones. It is often called “sweet thyme.”
  • Thymus vulgaris alphaterpineolThis type is harvested during the early spring and has a pepper-like smell.
  • Thymus vulgaris geraniol ­– The geraniol chemotype has a lemon-like fragrance and is grown in high altitudes. It is often picked during autumn.
  • Thymus vulgaris 1,8 cineole – This contains 80 to 90 percent cineole and has diuretic, anticatarrhal, expectorant, and analgesic properties.
  • Thymus vulgaris p-cymene– This should be obtained from spring or else it becomes a different chemotype.
  • Thymus vulgaris phenol­– These are thyme plants that grow in high altitudes and contain up to 90 percent of phenol compounds.

Benefits of Thyme Oil

As I previously mentioned, thyme oil is an effective natural agent against nasty bacterial strains. A study presented at the Society for General Microbiology’s spring conference in Edinburgh pointed out that essential oils may be efficient and affordable alternatives to antibiotics in the battle against resistant bacteria.

Among the essential oils tested, cinnamon oil and thyme oil were found to be the most successful against various Staphylococcus species, including the dreaded MRSA.  Researchers said that this can help lower antibiotic use and minimize the formation of new resistant strains of microorganisms.

Oil of thyme can also function as a decontaminate for food products. As shown in Food Microbiology, both basil, and thyme essential oils exhibited antimicrobial properties against Shigella sonnei and Shigella flexneri that may contaminate food. The compounds thymol and carvacrol in thyme oil demonstrated this benefit.

Furthermore, thyme oil can be used as a preservative against spoilage and several foodborne germs that can contribute to health problems. It is effective against other forms of bacteria like Salmonella, Enterococcus, Escherichia, and Pseudomonas species.

Other reports also show that oil of thyme has anti-inflammatory properties. In a research published in the Journal of Lipid Research, six essential oils including thyme oil showed the ability to suppress the inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme in the same manner as the antioxidant resveratrol does. It was noted that the chemical constituent carvacrol was responsible for this effect.

The same study also noted that thyme and the other essential oils activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which help suppress COX-2 expression.

In addition to these, significant health benefits of thyme oil include:

  • Helps reduce symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Stimulates menstrual flow
  • Increases circulation and elevates low blood pressure
  • Triggers the removal of waste that may lead to cellulite
  • Eases nervousness and anxiety
  • Helps fight insomnia
  • Eliminates bad breath and body odor

How to Make Thyme Oil

Thyme essential oil is produced through the steam distillation of the fresh or partially dried leaves and flowers of the thyme plant. Distillation produces a red-, browns, or orange-colored thyme oil, which has a strong, spicy smell. Further distillation yields white thyme oil, a clear or pale yellow oil with a mild fragrance. As mentioned before, its chemical composition varies depending on the type of thyme used in production.

Fortunately, you can make infused thyme oil at home. Here’s is one guide you can use.

What You Need:

  • ½ cup fresh thyme
  • 8 ounces carrier oil (ex. olive oil)
  • Mortar and pestle
  • Saucepan
  • Funnel
  • Glass container

Procedure:

  • Wash the herbs and dry it by patting it with a clean cloth. You may also dry it in the sun or place it in a salad spinner.
  • Crush the herbs using the mortar and pestle to release their natural oils.
  • Place the crushed thyme and its oil into the saucepan, and place the carrier oil. Simmer this mixture over medium heat for at least five minutes or until it produces bubbles.
  • Turn the heat off and allow the mixture to cool. Pour the mixture into the glass container then store in a cool place.

How Does Thyme Oil Work?

Thyme oil can be used in a number of ways. It can be inhaled, applied topically, or used as a mouthwash. Below are some particular ways to enjoy its benefits:

  • Relieve pain – Mix three drops of thyme oil with two teaspoons of sesame oil. Use this mixture as a massage oil and apply on the abdominal area to relieve pain. This may also be used as a massage oil to treat other types of pain.
  • Alleviate fatigue – Add two drops of thyme oil to your bath water.
  • Improve sleep – Add a few drops to your diffuser.
  • Promote oral health – Use thyme oil as a mouthwash by adding one drop to a cup of warm water.
  • Reduce the appearance of scars and skin marks – Apply oil of thyme mixed with any carrier oil (like almond oil) on the affected area.
  • Use as cleanser – Add a few drops of thyme oil to your facial wash.
  • Treat or protect against respiratory problems – Add two drops of thyme oil to hot water and use for steam inhalation.
  • Uplift mood – Simply inhale the scent of thyme oil.

Is Thyme Oil Safe?

Thyme oil should not be used directly on the skin, as it can cause sensitization. It must be first diluted with a carrier oil (like olive oil or almond oil). Before use, test on a small area to see if you have any allergies.

This herbal oil should not be taken internally, as it can cause nausea, dizziness, vomiting, diarrhea, and muscle problems. Doing so may also negatively impact your heart, lungs, and body temperature. It may also stimulate the thyroid gland, which is why this essential oil is not recommended for people with hyperthyroidism.

Since thyme oil can be used to increase circulation, it should be avoided by people with high blood pressure. Pregnant women should steer clear of thyme oil because it can stimulate menstrual flow. Thyme oil should also be kept away from infants and young children because they are sensitive.

Thyme Oil Side Effects

Use of thyme oil may result in allergic reactions, even when it’s diluted. Some people who use it may experience dermatitis or inflammation of the skin. People with allergies to rosemary or mint oils should also stay away from thyme and its essential oil.

Always consult a physician or anyone knowledgeable in essential oils before using one, especially if you’re suffering from any disease or are taking certain medications.

Lemongrass Oil.

You may have tasted the refreshingly mild flavor of lemongrass, a herb that’s commonly added to foods and beverages. But have you ever tried using lemongrass oil, an all-around herbal oil with many health benefits? Keep on reading to discover more about lemongrass oil.

What Is Lemongrass Oil?

Lemongrass (Cymbopogon) is a tall perennial plant from the Poaceae grass family, which thrives in tropical and subtropical regions, such as in India, Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, China, and Guatemala. This plant grows in dense clumps and has bright-green, sharp-edged leaves, similar to grass.

Lemongrass is a popular flavoring in Asian cooking – added to curries and soups, or paired with beef, fish, poultry, and seafood. Fresh lemongrass is also used to make lemongrass tea.

There are over 50 varieties of lemongrass, but not all are edible or ideal for medicinal purposes. The two varieties of lemongrass most popularly used today are Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon flexuosus. While they can be used interchangeably, especially for making lemongrass oil, C. citratus is more popularly known in culinary applications, while C. flexuosus is more dominant in industrial applications, such as perfumery.

Lemongrass oil is extracted from the leaves of the plant. It has a thin consistency and a pale or bright yellow color. It has a strong, fresh, lemony, and earthy scent.

Uses of Lemongrass Oil

Lemongrass oil is a great addition to various skin care and cosmetic products, such as soaps, deodorants, shampoos, lotions, and tonics. It also works as an air freshener and deodorizer, especially when blended with other essential oils like geranium or bergamot. Simply put it in an oil burner, diffuser, or vaporizer.

Lemongrass oil is also known for its ability to repel insects, such as mosquitoes and ants, due to its high citral and geraniol content. Spray it around your home, diffuse it, or rub a diluted mixture on your skin.

Lemongrass oil’s refreshing scent makes it a valuable aroma therapeutic oil. It’s clean and calming aroma helps relieve stress, anxiety, irritability, and insomnia, and prevent drowsiness.Lemongrass oil can also help relax and tone your muscles, as well as relieve muscle pain, rheumatism, period cramps, stomachache, toothache, migraines, and headaches.

Here are some ways to use lemongrass oil:

  • Make a refreshing foot bath. Add two drops to a bowl of warm water, and soak your feet for 10 minutes. If your feet are aching, add two tablespoons of Epsom salts.
  • Make a massage oil by mixing it with sweet almond or jojoba oil.
  • Kill your pet’s fleas and lice by spraying diluted lemongrass oil all over his coat. You can also soak his collar in it, add it to his final rinse after shampooing, or spray it on his bedding.
  • Blend it into your favorite bath products or add it to your bath water. 

Composition of Lemongrass Oil

The main compounds of lemongrass oil are geranyl acetate, myrcene, nerol, citronellol, terpineol, methyl heptanone, di pentane, geraniol, neral, farnesol, limonene, and citral. These are known to have anti-fungal, antiseptic, insecticidal, and counter-irritant properties.

Citral is known for its antimicrobial effects, and can help kill or suppress the growth of bacteria and fungi. It’s said that lemongrass oil’s quality is generally determined by its citral content.

Another beneficial compound in lemongrass is limonene, which helps reduce inflammation and kill bacteria, according to research.

Benefits of Lemongrass Oil

Lemongrass oil has analgesic, antimicrobial, antiseptic, carminative, astringent, antipyretic, fungicidal, bactericidal, and antidepressant properties, making it one of the most versatile and health-promoting essential oils. It works well for:

  • Inflammation – Lemongrass is an analgesic that can help reduce pain and inflammation, which can lead to many chronic diseases. According to a 2005 study by Dr. Sue Chao, lemongrass oil is one of the top six essential oils with anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Hair problems – If you’re struggling with hair loss, oily hair, and other scalp conditions, lemongrass oil may be beneficial as it can help strengthen your hair follicles. Just apply a diluted solution onto your scalp, and then rinse out.
  • Infections – Lemongrass can help kill both internal and external bacterial and fungal infections, such as ringworm and athlete’s foot.  In a 2008 study from the Weber State University in Utah, it was found that out of 91 essential oils tested, lemongrass ranked highest in inhibitory activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection.
  • Fever – The antipyretic effect of lemongrass oil helps bring down very high fever, especially when it is beginning to reach dangerous levels.23
  • Digestive issues – A diluted lemongrass mixture helps facilitate nutrient assimilation and boosts the functioning of the digestive system, which is helpful for treating bowel problems and digestive disorders. It also prevents the formation of excessive gas and increases urination, which helps eliminate toxins from the body.

How to Make Lemongrass Oil

Lemongrass oil sold in the market today is made via steam distillation. But if you have lemongrass growing in your backyard, you can easily make this oil by infusing it with another carrier oil. Here’s a simple method:

Materials:

4 to 6 lemongrass stalks
Fine cheesecloth
Mortar and pestle
Carrier oil (Olive, rice bran, grapeseed, or any unscented natural oil)
Two jars
Dark glass container

Procedure:

  1. Get two lemongrass stalks and remove the leaves. Crush the stalks using a mortar and pestle (or any heavy object) to release the oil.
  2. Fill a jar with your carrier oil of choice and put the crushed stalk in it. Leave the jar for two days in a place where it can get plenty of heat and sunshine.
  3. After two days, strain the oil using the cheesecloth and transfer it into another jar. Make sure to press and squeeze the stalks until they’re completely dry.
  4. You may need to repeat the process using fresh new stalks to achieve the desired lemongrass fragrance. Just keep replacing the stalks every two days to increase the oil’s potency.
  5. Once you’ve reached the desired fragrance, transfer the oil into a dark glass container and leave it in a cool, dry and dark place. You can use this oil for a year or more.

How Does Lemongrass Oil Work?

Lemongrass oil is a tonic that influences and helps keep the systems in your body working properly, including the respiratory, digestive, nervous, and excretory systems. It also allows nutrients to be absorbed into the body, which keeps your immune system strong and robust.

Lemongrass oil can be diffused using a vaporizer, inhaled, applied topically, or ingested. To ensure the efficiency of lemongrass oil, you should use it depending on the health condition that you want to improve. For example, if you want to quell stress and anxiety, diffuse the oil using a vaporizer. But if you want to relieve muscle pain or use it to treat infections, it’s better to massage a diluted solution in the affected areas.

For internal health ailments, such as digestive issues, lemongrass oil can be taken internally in a diluted form. However, I do not recommend taking this oil orally without the supervision of a qualified healthcare provider.

Is Lemongrass Oil Safe?

Lemongrass oil is generally safe as long as it is used in small quantities (it is one of the strongest-smelling oils in aromatherapy) and properly blended with a carrier oil. Undiluted lemongrass can actually burn and injure your skin due to its high citral content, so it’s best to mix it with a carrier oil. Some of the best carrier oils you can use with lemongrass oil are basil, palmarosa, vetiver oil, lavender, rose, clary sage, patchouli, ginger, fennel, geranium, sandalwood, and cedarwood.

I advise doing a patch test before applying lemongrass oil on your skin, to see if you have any adverse reactions to this essential oil.

Side Effects of Lemongrass Oil

Skin irritation, discomfort, rashes and a burning sensation are some topical side effects experienced by people with sensitivity to lemongrass oil. Using the oil may also lead to lowered blood glucose, and may have contraindications for people who are taking oral diabetes drugs or antihypertensive medications, as well as those who are diabetic and hypoglycemic.

I do not recommend children, pregnant women, and nursing moms to use lemongrass oil orally. Those with liver or kidney disease and other health conditions should also consult their physician before using lemongrass oil.

Cinnamon Leaf Oil.

Beyond its alluring fragrance and spicy-sweet flavor, cinnamon provides many  benefits for your health, such as its insulin-like effects, which can be useful for diabetics. But did you know that you can also get many of cinnamon’s health benefits by using cinnamon leaf oil? Here are facts worth knowing about this oil.

What Is Cinnamon Leaf Oil?

Cinnamon leaf oil comes from Cinnamonum verum (also called Laurus cinnamomum) from the Laurel (Lauraceae) plant family. This small and bushy evergreen tree is native to Sri Lanka, but now grows in many countries such as India, China, Bangladesh, Myanmar, and Indonesia. There are actually over 100 varieties of C. verum, with Cinnamonum zeylanicum (Ceylon cinnamon) and Cinnamomun aromaticum (Chinese cinnamon) as the most consumed.

Cinnamon tree can be distinguished by its small, white flowers, shiny, leathery green leaves, and purple oval berries. Its papery, pale brown bark has thick quills that roll inside one another, and are gathered every two years.

Cinnamon is one of the oldest spices known to man. It was valued in ancient Egypt not only as a medicine and beverage flavoring but also as an embalming agent and is also mentioned in the Bible. Cinnamon was so precious that it was considered more valuable than gold throughout some of its history.

You’ve probably heard of cinnamon bark oil, but don’t be confused – it’s an entirely different product. Cinnamon bark oil is extracted from the outer bark of the tree, resulting in a potent, perfume-quality essential oil. Cinnamon bark oil is extremely refined and therefore very expensive for everyday use, which is why many people settle for cinnamon leaf oil, as it’s lighter, cheaper, and ideal for regular use.

Cinnamon leaf oil has a musky and spicy scent, and a light yellow tinge that distinguishes it from the red-brown color of cinnamon bark oil.

Uses of Cinnamon Leaf Oil

Cinnamon leaf oil can be used as an additive in soaps and a flavoring to seasonings. When used in aromatherapy – diffused, applied topically (I recommend diluting with a mild essential  oil or mixing in your favorite cream, lotion, or shampoo), or added to your bath water – it can have health-promoting effects. Here are some ways to use cinnamon leaf oil for your health and around your home:

  • Use it as a disinfectant. With its strong germicidal properties, cinnamon leaf oil works as a non-toxic natural disinfectant. Use it to clean your toilets, refrigerator, kitchen counters and other surfaces, door knobs, microwave, and sneakers. You can even use it to clean and disinfect your chopping boards.
  • Make a facial scrub. Mix it with cinnamon sugar, orange juice, and olive oil to create a rejuvenating scrub that has antiseptic properties to kill facial bacteria effectively.
  • Gargle as a mouthwash. Add a drop or two to a glass of purified water, and gargle with it. For people with dentures, simply make a solution of water, hydrogen peroxide, and cinnamon leaf oil, and soak your dentures in it.
  • Add it to your foot soak. Get rid of nasty fungal infections by mixing a drop of cinnamon leaf oil in a bucket of warm water, and then soak your feet in it. This works great for athletes and people who wear closed shoes for most of the day.
  • Use cinnamon leaf oil as an insect repellent. Did you know that the scent of cinnamon leaf oil can deter pesky household insects, such as black ants, mosquitoes, roaches, and flies? Studies found that it may even be more effective at repelling mosquitoes than the toxic chemical DEET. Simply spray or diffuse the oil around your home. You can also spray it over your mattresses and sheets to get rid of bed bugs.
  • Add it to your shampoo. Add a drop of cinnamon leaf oil to your regular non-chemical shampoo. This will help keep your hair healthy and, in children, help kill stubborn head lice.

Composition of Cinnamon Leaf Oil

The oil extracted from cinnamon leaves contain phenols and beneficial components like eugenol, eugenol acetate, cinnamic aldehyde, linalool, and benzyl benzoate. It also has low levels of cinnamaldehyde, an excellent flavoring agent and the active component that helps repel mosquitoes and other insects.

Benefits of Cinnamon Leaf Oil

Cinnamon leaf oil can work wonders as a quick pick-me-up or stress buster after a long and tiring day, or if you want to soothe your aching muscles and joints. This oil has a warm and antispasmodic effect on your body that helps ease muscular aches, sprains, rheumatism, and arthritis. It’s also a tonic that reduces drowsiness and gives you an energy boost if you’re physically and mentally exhausted.

Cinnamon leaf oil offers benefits against viral infections, such as coughs and colds, and helps prevent them from spreading. It even aids in destroying germs in your gallbladder and bacteria that cause staph infections. When diffused using a vaporizer or burner, cinnamon leaf oil can help treat chest congestion and bronchitis.

Cinnamon can also help remove blood impurities and even aid in improving blood circulation. This helps ensure that your body’s cells receive adequate oxygen supply, which not only promotes metabolic activity but also reduces your risk of suffering from a heart attack.

Cinnamon leaf oil has gastric benefits as well, mainly because of its eugenol content. It works well for alleviating nausea, upset stomach, and diarrhea. It also works as an antibacterial agent that can promote good digestion.

How to Make Cinnamon Leaf Oil

Cinnamon leaf oil, which is more delicate than cinnamon bark oil, is produced via steam distillation. The leathery green leaves are pruned from the trees and then left to dry for several days. Afterwards, they go through a special water-steam distillation machine that extracts the oil.

Cinnamon leaf oil can also be distilled via traditional methods, where a huge wooden vessel is fitted with a copper head on top that holds as much as 200 kilograms of dried cinnamon leaves. The vessel is then placed in a wood-fired boiler that produces the steam for distillation.

How Does Cinnamon Leaf Oil Work?

The phenols in cinnamon leaves give cinnamon leaf oil its rejuvenating and health-promoting quality. Cinnamon leaf oil contains 80 percent phenols, mainly eugenol, which has anesthetic, antiseptic, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties. However, eugenol may also irritate your skin, especially when applied near or on the mucous membranes.

Is Cinnamon Leaf Oil Safe?

While the cinnamon powder on your spice rack is safe to consume internally, the same cannot be said for cinnamon leaf oil. DO NOT ingest it without the supervision of a qualified health practitioner. Do not self-medicate with cinnamon leaf oil, as it can cause irritation, especially on your mucous membranes.

When applying cinnamon leaf oil topically, I advise blending it with safe carrier oils, such as coconut oil, olive oil, or almond oil. It also blends well with other spice oils like black pepper, cardamom clove, and ginger oils. Check and make sure that you don’t have any allergic reactions to cinnamon leaf oil before using it. You can do this by performing a skin patch test: apply a small amount of diluted cinnamon leaf oil on your skin and see if any allergic reactions occur.

I also recommend pregnant women and nursing mothers to avoid using cinnamon leaf oil, as it has emmenagogue effects, meaning it may induce menstruation, which is dangerous for the unborn child. Avoid administering the oil on very young children, too.

Side Effects of Cinnamon Leaf Oil

Use cinnamon oil in moderation and properly diluted, as high dosages may lead to convulsions in some individuals. This oil may also lead to side effects such as skin irritation, mouth sores, dizziness, vomiting, and diarrhea. It may irritate your urinary tract, intestines, and stomach lining, if taken internally. If these symptoms occur, consult a healthcare practitioner immediately.

Calendula Oil.

Marigold has much value today and in traditional cultures as a homeopathic remedy, but the oil extracted from the flowers, called calendula oil, is not far behind in providing benefits. Learn more about this oil distilled from the petals of the pot marigold or Calendula officinalis, and how you can harness its health and practical everyday uses.

What Is Calendula Oil?

Marigold is a genus of about 15 to 20 species of plants in the Asteraceae family. This flower is native to Southwestern Asia, as well as Western Europe and the Mediterranean. The common name “marigold” refers to the Virgin Mary, to which it is associated in the 17th century.

Apart from being used to honor the Virgin Mary during Catholic events, marigold was also considered by ancient Egyptians to have rejuvenating properties. Hindus used the flowers to adorn statues of gods in their temples, as well as to color their food, fabrics, and cosmetics.

Pot marigold or C. Officinalis is the most commonly cultivated and used species and is the source of the herbal oil. “Calendula” comes from the Latin word “calendar,” meaning “little calendar,” because the flower blooms on the calends or the first of most months. It should not be confused with ornamental marigolds of the Tagetes genus, commonly grown in vegetable gardens.

Calendula, with fiery red and yellow petals, is full of flavonoids, which are found naturally in vegetables and fruits and are substances that give plants their lovely bright colors.

Calendula oil is distilled from the flower tops and is quite sticky and viscous. It has a very strange smell described as musky, woody, and even rotten – like the marigold flowers themselves. This smell does not readily appeal to many individuals, even in when used in a remedy.

Uses of Calendula Oil

Here are three classifications of calendula plant and oil uses:

  1. Health and wellness – It has tonic, sudorific, emmenagogic, and antispasmodic properties, but it is mainly used for skin care and treatment. It has great anti-inflammatory and vulnerary action, making it helpful for stubborn wounds, acne, ulcers, bed sores, varicose veins, rashes, eczema, and related conditions. It addresses sore, inflamed, and itchy skin conditions.Calendula massage oil also greatly heals, soothes, and softens skin, making it a good addition to massage oils or when preparing a carrier oil blend.
  2. Cooking – Since the Middle Ages, the petals of marigold have been used as “the poor man’s saffron” for coloring cheeses, butter, and dishes. During the Elizabethan era, both petals and leaves were used in salads, although the latter showed to be very strong. The petals flavored soups and stews.
  3. Practical uses – Marigold has been used as a dye. Dried petals can also be added in potpourris.

Composition of Calendula Oil

In a study, calendula oil was obtained in low yield (0.3 percent) by steam distillation with cohabitation from flowers and whole plants. Identified by the researchers were 66 components, mainly sesquiterpene alcohols. α-cadinol was the main constituent, about 25 percent. The essential oil from the whole plant was found different from that of the flowers through the presence of monoterpenes hydrocarbons aside from the alcohols.

The principal constitutes of calendula essential oil are flavonoids, saponoside, triterpene alcohol, and a bitter principle. The useful components of calendula itself include a volatile oil, carotenoids, flavonoids, mucilage, resin, polysaccharides, aromatic plant acids, saponins, glycosides, and sterols.

Benefits of Calendula Oil

Calendula oil is traditionally used for abdominal cramps and constipation. It’s your skin that will receive a good bulk of the benefits, thanks to the oil’s anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and related properties. Here are some of the promoted benefits of this oil:

  1. Skin dryness or chapping – Calendula oil is a great moisturizer for dry skin and for severely chapped or split skin. It soothes the area and reduces the pain.
  2. Inflammation – It works well on swelling sprained muscles or bruises; its anti-inflammatory action helps lessen swelling from injury. Calendula oil also helps treat spider veins, varicose veins, leg ulcers, and chilblains.
  3. Baby care – The oil helps relief diaper rashes, which can extremely irritate an infant.
  4. Minor cuts and wounds – The antiseptic and antimicrobial action of the oil help speed up healing of wounds and minor cuts, and also benefit insect bites, acne, and bed sores.
  5. Skin issues – Eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, and other skin problems can be soothed using calendula oil, applied topically. Calendula oil’s antifungal action is also great for treating athlete’s foot, ringworm, and jock itch.

How to Make Calendula Oil

Calendula oil is extracted by steam distillation. There is almost no way to obtain 100 percent pure calendula essential oil, so this makes calendula essential oil an infusion and not a pure extract. In order to get the oil from the flower, the petals are steeped in oil, preferably olive oil. The oil left over when distillation is done is calendula oil, which should be a golden orange color.

You can create homemade calendula oil using the following instructions:

What you will need:

  • Dried calendula petals
  • Carrier oil (olive oil, almond oil, or sunflower oil are some great options)
  • A clean glass jar with a lid

There are two methods to infuse the oil:

  • Cold infusion method – This is the usually preferred techniques because it protects the delicate calendula from heat damage.
    1. Put your desired amount of dried calendula petals in a clean, dry glass jar.
    2. Fill the jar with your carrier oil of choice to cover the petals by an inch.
    3. Put in a sunny place to infuse for four weeks.
    4. Drain the petals from the oil and store the oil in a container with a lid for up to one year.
  • Hot infusion method – This method is much quicker than the cold infusion method but won’t have the same strength because of the presence of heat.
    1. Put your desired amount of dried calendula petals in a clean, dry glass jar.
    2. Fill the jar with your carrier oil of choice to cover the petals by an inch.
    3. Dump the entire contents of the jar (the petals and the oil) in a small saucepan or slow cookers. Heat on low for four hours, stirring occasionally.
    4. Let cool. Drain the petals from the oil and store the oil in a container with a lid for up to one year.

You can use the homemade calendula oil as an after-bath body oil, salve, baby oil, lotion, or home remedy for dry skin, inflamed areas, or rashes.

How Does Calendula Oil Work?

Calendula oil is used in various products, oftentimes as a great base for lotions, salves, creams, several natural cosmetics and personal care products, and herbal ointments. It also very commonly works as a base oil in aromatherapy. Furthermore, you can use calendula oil in an all-natural herbal hair color recipe.

You can create an infused oil by filling a jar with the dried flowers, which you cover with a carrier oil. You can get more out of these flowers by macerating the mixture in a blender. Leave it infused for two weeks or more to extract the flowers’ beneficial properties. When ready to use, filter the oil through cheesecloth, and use it directly in a balm or as part of a homemade cream or lotion.

Is Calendula Oil Safe?

Calendula oil is generally safe for use, but I advise you to heed the following safety guidelines and considerations:

  1. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should generally avoid using calendula oil. Do not take calendula by mouth, as there is a concern that it might cause a miscarriage. Avoid topical use as well.
  2. An allergic reaction may occur in individuals who are sensitivity to ragweed and related plants, such as marigolds, chrysanthemums, and daisies. Before using calendula oil, check with your doctor if you have allergies.
  3. Combined with medications used during and after surgery, calendula use might cause too much drowsiness and should be stopped at least two weeks before surgery.

Side Effects of Calendula Oil

If you are not pregnant, nursing, allergic, or about to undergo surgery, you can use calendula oil with likely no side effect. It is best, however, to consult your healthcare provider, especially for therapeutic use.

Remember, though, that sedative medications or CNS depressants interact with calendula. The plant extract might cause sleepiness and drowsiness, and taking it with sedative drugs might result in excess sleepiness. Some sedative drugs include clonazepam, (Klonopin), phenobarbital (Donnatal), and zolpidem (Ambien). I advise you to also explore safe, natural ways to get a good night’s sleep.