THE IMPORTANCE OF PROPERLY STORING ESSENTIAL OILS

The shelf life, quality, beneficial properties, and safe use of an Essential Oil depends largely on the way in which it is stored. When kept in the proper vessel and at the proper temperature, an Essential Oil can achieve its maximum shelf life with a conservative estimate of at least one year. On the more liberal end of the scale, properly cared-for Essential Oils may even last for ten years or longer, depending on the type of oil and the storage conditions.

DO ESSENTIAL OILS EXPIRE?

Eventually, all Essential Oils will expire and become unsafe to use, thus correct storage and appropriate handling are advantageous to all oils. The quality of oil begins to progressively decline with the process of oxidation, which causes them to lose their aromas as well as their nourishing benefits. On a more encouraging note, Essential Oils do not all degrade at the same rate; while Essential Oils from citrus fruits are known to oxidize faster than all others – expiring and losing their scents and benefits as early as six months after being opened – Essential Oils with earthy or woody aromas, such as Patchouli and Sandalwood, tend to smell even better with maturity, taking much longer before beginning to weaken in potency and aroma; thus an oil’s lifespan may fluctuate greatly depending on the quality of the source botanical and the harvest, the extraction method and the conditions under which the oil is distilled, the batch/lot, storage and handling of the oil when it is first received by both the supplier and the customer, and the manner in which the supplier bottles, stores, and handles the oil.

HOW CAN YOU TELL IF ESSENTIAL OILS HAVE GONE BAD? WHAT DOES EXPIRED OIL SMELL AND LOOK LIKE?

There are four main ways to tell if an Essential Oil has deteriorated:

1) Its aroma has become stronger and likely unpleasant or it has weakened, depending on the oil

2) It has changed in color and has become darker, lighter, or even colorless, depending on the oil

3) It appears murky/foggy

4) It has thickened in consistency

There might be times when an oxidized Essential Oil will not exhibit the classic signs of deterioration, thus these are general guidelines. For this reason, it is strongly recommended that all oils be properly stored, handled, and used before they expire.

HOW LONG CAN YOU STORE OPENED ESSENTIAL OILS?

OIL TYPE MAIN CONSTITUENTS POPULAR ESSENTIAL OILS IN THIS CATEGORY LENGTH OF TIME
Citrus

Bright
Refreshing, 
Energizing

Monoterpenes (especially Limonene) Bergamot
Grapefruit
Lemon
Lime
Neroli
Orange
6 months-1 year
Fresh, Herbaceous, Warm, Slightly Spicy, Slightly Sweet, Softly Floral or Woody, Camphoraceous,

Stimulating, 
Uplifting, Deodorizing

Monoterpenes (especially Limonene)
Oxides
Angelica Root
Black Pepper
Cypress
Eucalyptus
Frankincense
Juniper Berry
Laurel Leaf
Lemongrass
Pine
Ravensara
Rosemary
Siberian Fir
Spruce
Tea Tree
1-3 Years
Herbaceous, Camphorous, Spicy, Sweet, Woody

Balancing, Strengthening, Purifying

Aldehydes
Ethers
Ketones
Monoterpenols
Oxides
Phenols
Basil
(Cedar Leaf) Thuja
Clary Sage
Geranium
Hyssop
Lavender
Mugwort
Palmarosa
Peppermint
Sage
Tea Tree
Thyme
Rose Absolute
Rosewood
2-6 years
Fruity, Floral, Spicy, Woody

Balancing, Inspiring, and Soothing

Esters
Phenols
Birch
Clove Bud
Helichrysum
Jasmine Absolute
Roman Chamomile
Wintergreen
3-7 years
Woody, Earthy, Balsamic, Warm, Spicy

Sedative, Centering, Grounding, Calming

Sesquiterpenes
Sesquiterpenols
Black Pepper
Cedarwood
Copaiba Balsam
German Chamomile
Ginger
Myrrh
Patchouli
Sandalwood
Spikenard
Vetiver
Ylang Ylang
4-15 years

CAN YOU STORE ESSENTIAL OILS IN THE REFRIGERATOR?

Yes, Essential Oils can be stored in the refrigerator. This option is especially ideal for those who use their oils infrequently – for example, a couple of times a year.

CAN YOU STORE ESSENTIAL OILS IN THE FREEZER? IS IT ACCEPTABLE FOR ESSENTIAL OILS TO FREEZE?

Yes, Essential Oils may be stored in the freezer. If they freeze or form crystals that cause its appearance to become foggy, simply allow them to naturally return to room temperature before using them. The time it takes to “thaw” will depend on the oil and can range from minutes to several hours. Some crystallized oils can begin to liquify as the bottle is held in the hand and others may benefit from a warm water “bath” (placing the bottle in a bowl of shallow warm water). Whichever method is used, ensure that the bottle’s cap is kept on loosely, otherwise, the valuable volatile constituents will quickly escape. If there is too little headspace in the bottle and the cap is left on tightly during heating, the Essential Oil will build up pressure in the bottle and, when the cap is removed, the oil will spray all over. Leaving the cap loosely on the bottle will help prevent this.

PLACES WHERE ESSENTIAL OILS SHOULD NOT BE STORED

Do not store Essential Oils in hot, bright, or humid areas, such as in the bathroom, near a stove, on a window sill or other sunny area, and any places where constantly shifting room temperatures might potentially cause the quality of the oil to deteriorate faster.

WHICH FACTORS INFLUENCE AN OIL’S SHELF LIFE?

HEAT
Due to their flammable nature, Essential Oils should never be kept near open flames or any sources of heat or fire, such as sunlight, candles, and stoves. Leaving them vulnerable to high temperatures could lead to them reaching their unique flashpoints, which are the individual temperatures at which oils will ignite. Being frequently exposed often to heat will hasten an oil’s deterioration.

OXYGEN
When oils are exposed to air/oxygen, they become oxidized and their volatile constituents begin to fade, which means their fragrances – among other qualities – fade. This is largely caused by the oil’s bottle cap being left open for long periods of time. To prevent or slow the processes of oxidation and evaporation, it is important that bottles remain capped when Essential Oils are not in use. Oxidized oils, while not suggested for topical use or aromatherapy, can still be used for other applications, such as household cleaning.

LIGHT
When Essential Oils are kept in sunlit areas, their properties will be negatively impacted, and these include their aromas, appearances, and general effectiveness. For this reason, Essential Oils are sold and stored in darkly-colored bottles (most commonly amber, although dark blue, green, violet, and black have also become popular) to prevent UV radiation from penetrating the bottle. Regardless of the dark color of the bottle, it is still best to avoid placing oils in direct sunlight, as the recurrent heating and cooling will facilitate the oils’ oxidation.

MOISTURE
Moisture can enter oil bottles when they are left uncapped for an extended period, leaving the oils looking cloudy. The insides of the bottles will also form water beads. To reiterate, this can be prevented by keeping bottles capped.

HOW TO PROLONG SHELF LIFE AND KEEP TRACK OF OIL FRESHNESS

  1. Follow the oil company’s SDS documents or product pages, which outline handling and storage conditions.
  2. Do not store Essential Oils in direct sunlight; store them in cool, ambient areas.
  3. Prevent oxidation by displacing any oxygen in a bottle’s “head space” with Nitrogen, an inert gas that is heavier than oxygen and that does not react with any Essential Oil constituents.
  4. Make note of the date on which you buy an Essential Oil. This date can be marked on the product itself, either on the label or on the cap.
  5. Do not keep undiluted Essential Oils in dropper bottles, as the rubber will become gummy and spoil the quality of the oil.
  6. Ensure that the bottle cap is always screwed on tightly.
  7. Aim to keep Essential Oil bottles as full as possible; any empty space or “headspace” in the bottle is filled with oxygen, which can speed up the oxidation process. If necessary, transfer the oil into smaller containers that will be fuller.
  8. Do not insert any objects directly into the bottle; first, pour the necessary amount into/onto sterilized equipment, dilute, then apply as preferred.

THE BEST WAY TO STORE ESSENTIAL OILS

CAN YOU STORE ESSENTIAL OILS IN… YES/NO WHY?/WHY NOT?
Clear Glass Containers? Yes and No Although clear/colorless glass bottles will not cause damage to Essential Oils, they will also not prevent damaging UV radiation from influencing the quality of the oil. Darkly colored bottles (such as amber bottles) are recommended instead.
Aluminum Containers? Yes and No Aluminum bottles are suitable for storage if their interiors are lined with food-grade Epoxy lining.

They are a safe method for Essential Oil transportation and are ideal for short-term storage.

Metal or Stainless-Steel Containers? Yes Stainless-Steel is an ideal material for storing Essential Oils as well as for mixing Essential Oils when working with natural recipes; avoid plastic or wooden materials when working with Essential Oil-enhanced recipes.
Plastic Containers? No Storing Essential Oils in plastic containers causes paneling, and petrochemicals in the material may negatively react with the Essential Oils.

Plastic is also known to absorb Essential Oils, which poses a challenge when cleaning the container.

Blended or diluted products, such as moisturizers or massage oils, are relatively safe to store in plastic containers.

STORING ESSENTIAL OILS WHILE TRAVELLING

To properly and safely store Essential Oils on the go, travelers’ carrying cases are available to take favorite oils along for a trip, with some cases designed to carry more than forty oils at once.

WHAT ARE THE DANGERS OF USING EXPIRED ESSENTIAL OILS?

Spoiled Essential Oils are said to be harmful, and using them can be detrimental to one’s health. They are reputed to cause skin sensitization, irritation, peeling, rashes, inflammation, and burning, among various other potentially disagreeable results.

ESSENTIAL OILS SIDE EFFECTS

Essential Oils are for external use only. It is imperative to consult a medical practitioner before using these oils for therapeutic purposes. Pregnant and nursing women are especially advised not to use Essential Oils without the medical advice of a physician, as they may have effects on certain hormone secretions and it is unclear whether these effects are transferable to babies at these stages of development. These oils should always be stored in an area that is inaccessible to children, especially those under the age of 7.

Those with the following health conditions are especially recommended to be advised by a physician: cancer, heart-related ailments, skin disorders or allergies, hormone-related ailments, or epilepsy. Individuals that are taking prescription drugs, undergoing major surgery, or who are at a greater risk of experiencing strokes, heart attacks, or atherosclerosis are also advised to seek medical consultation prior to use.

Prior to using any Essential Oil, a skin test is recommended. This can be done by diluting 1 drop of the Essential Oil in 4 drops of a Carrier Oil and applying a dime-size amount of this blend to a small area of skin that is not sensitive. Essential Oils must never be used near the eyes, inner nose, and ears, or on any other particularly sensitive areas of skin. Potential side effects of Essential Oils include redness, rash, hives, burning, bleeding disorders, decreased speed of healing, low blood pressure, dizziness, headache, nausea, diarrhea, convulsions, and rapid heartbeat. In the event of an allergic reaction, discontinue use of the products and see a doctor, pharmacist, or allergist immediately for a health assessment and appropriate remedial action. To prevent side effects, consult with a medical professional prior to use.

Grapefruit Essential Oil: A Fresh Scent, Home Remedy

Luscious, juicy, and pleasingly fragrant grapefruit shares the nutritional qualities of other citrus species, being high in vitamin C, plus delivering ample potassium, folic acid, beta-carotene (red fruits only), and capillary-strengthening flavonoids.  It has a stabilizing effect on blood sugar, enhances digestion, acts as a mild diuretic, diminishes the appetite, and offers valuable protection against infectious illnesses.  And – who can resist the delightfully uplifting scent of the freshly squeezed juice and peel?

Native to tropical Asia and the West Indies, grapefruit trees are now cultivated primarily in California, Florida, and Texas, as well as Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, and Israel.  Much of the essential oil is produced in the United States by cold expression of the outer part of the fresh peel of the ripe fruit, yielding a yellow or yellowish-green liquid.  Oil that is distilled from the peel and remains of the fruit after making juice is of inferior quality for aromatherapeutic purposes. Grapefruit essential oil oxidizes quickly (as do all citrus oils), so use it within 1 year, or within 2 years if you keep it refrigerated and don’t open it often.

Grapefruit essential oil is one of my top picks to include in massage oil blends, often combined with ginger, cypress, and peppermint essential oils, to ease conditions of water retention, fatigue, heavy legs and feet, and general overall achiness.  Its astringent action also benefits oily skin and scalp.

This delightful medicinal oil offers an amazingly effective and aromatically pleasing cognitive boost that stokes your mental fires, enhancing concentration and mental clarity.  I’ve long adored both the fruit and the oil, as I find the fruit deliciously satisfying and it’s oil scent-sational.  It makes my mind and body smile!  Clients love it when my reflexology treatment room smells of grapefruit – clean and fresh.  I highly recommend adding grapefruit essential oil to spritzer recipes (room mists) to lighten and brighten the environment and mood of those in it. It blends well with other citrus essential oils as well as peppermint, spearmint, lavender, neroli, rose, geranium, rosemary, and ylang-ylang.

Psychological Benefits:  Grapefruit lifts the spirits, being beneficial during times of overwhelming stress, depression, mental fatigue, and nervous exhaustion. It’s especially helpful for the PMS blues.  Like other citrus oils, it delivers a general feeling of well-being and builds your sense of humor.  A rather empowering oil, grapefruit helps improve your confidence and sense of self-worth.

Essential Properties In A Nutshell:   Anti-infectious; gently warming; very refreshing and cleansing; detoxifying; appetite suppressant and digestive aid; eases tension and digestive headaches; enhances circulation; astringent and diuretic; deodorizing; emotionally uplifting during times of great stress; antidepressant.

Safety Data & Usage Information:  Grapefruit essential oil is considered nontoxic, nonirritating, and generally nonsensitizing, with only a low risk of photosensitivity.Good to know:  Certain medications come with a warning against ingesting grapefruit juice while you are taking them.  Why?  Because grapefruit juice contains dihydroxybergamottin, a chemical compound that interferes with the effectiveness of many medications.  Grapefruit essential oil – expressed from the peel only – does not contain this compound, so it is safe to use in aromatherapy for individuals who are avoiding grapefruit juice because of their medication.

Always dilute essential oils properly – according to age, health, medication intake, and skin condition – prior to application.

The following oh-so-fragrant recipe highlights the therapeutic nature of grapefruit essential oil with regard to its gently stimulating, mentally clarifying properties.

“Sunshine-in-a-Bottle” Mist

By their very light, refreshing nature, most citrus oils tend to be rather uplifting to the psyche and particularly good at stimulating a sluggish mind and stagnant circulation, which is why I chose them for the basis of this sparkling, ultra-fresh formula.  I added rosemary essential oil for the sharp, energizing, mind-clearing properties that it lends.  A few spritzes around my home office with this mist is a sure-fire way to blast out the “mental cobwebs” after an afternoon spent working at my computer.

Contraindication:  DO NOT use this mist in small rooms or bedrooms with children under 2 years of age or in rooms with caged pets.

Essential Oils:

• 20 drops grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) essential oil
• 15 drops lemon (Citrus limon) essential oil
• 15 drops sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) essential oil
• 10 drops rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis ct. cineole or non-chemotype specific) essential oil

Base:

• 1/2 cup plain, unflavored vodka (80- or 100-proof)
• 1/2 cup purified or distilled water

Container:

• 8-ounce plastic (PET or HDPE) or dark glass spritzer bottle

To Make The Mist: Pour the vodka and water into the bottle, then add the grapefruit, lemon, orange, and rosemary essential oils.  Screw the top on the bottle and shake vigorously to blend.  Label the bottle and allow the spray to synergize for 1 hour.  Store at room temperature, away from heat and light; use within 1 year.

To Use: Shake well before each use.  When in need of mental stimulation, lightly mist your surrounding area and breathe deeply.  Use as desired.

Yield:; 8 ounces (240 ml)

Bonus uses: The essential oils in this formula contain general antiseptic properties that will help keep your work area and home free of infectious nasties.  Spray throughout the house several times per day during cold and flu season.  You can also spray the blend on your hands after washing as an added layer of wellness protection.  I suggest placing a bottle by the kitchen sink and in each bathroom.

Spikenard and Sustainability – Tisserand Institute

Spikenard is at least as endangered as Rosewood, which is a slow-growing rainforest tree and is not easy to cultivate. It is important to source ethically.

Source: Spikenard and Sustainability – Tisserand Institute

MARKET REPORT APRIL 2019

The following report contains updates on the current trends in production and availability of the most in-demand Essential Oils, Carrier Oils, and Raw Materials sourced from around the globe.

Cardamom Oil

In India, Cardamom is harvested from October to February. The flooding in south India last year led to unfavorable growing conditions as well as damage to huge crops of Cardamom, resulting in a lower harvest yield. The decline in Cardamom Oil production throughout India has led to a steep demand for the oil. Market conditions are favorable for this product, and this year’s continuous increase in the prices of Cardamom fruits has placed pressure on the Indian market for the supply of the same. This year, prices are expected to further increase.

In Sri Lanka, Organic Cardamom is harvested from July to October. A drought has negatively affected this year’s crop, resulting in a low harvest yield, which is only ¼ from last year. Furthermore, prices are extremely high and are expected to remain the same for a few years. The current, significantly high demand cannot be met, due to the severe shortage of raw materials. Given this extremely limited supply, buyers are advised to cover their requirements for the next 6-8 months as early as possible.

Coriander Oil

In India, Coriander is harvested from February to March. While regular production was an estimated 4-500,000 MT, this year it is expected to decline. In India, most Coriander seeds are converted into powder with a lesser quantity being used for oil extraction. The major buyers of Coriander seeds are spice powder-making industries. The demand from spice-processing industries was expected to increase beginning in April, and it is expected to continue until June. Coriander prices rose previously, and there has been an upward trend in the prices due to a decline in production in 2018-19 (Oct-Sep) in key growing areas. From 2018-19, Coriander acreage across the country declined by 27%.

Camphor Oil

In China, the wood of the Camphor tree is harvested throughout the year in all four seasons. The current growing conditions are favorable; however, it is too soon to predict the harvest yield. There is a strong demand for this oil.

Sage Dalmatian Oil

In Albania, Sage is harvested between June and December. It is typically cultivated near mountains, where the soil and the climate are similar to wild grown Sage, and there are no current issues with cultivation. The harvest yield is projected to be the same as that of last year. The demand and market conditions depend on customer requests.

Pine Scotch Oil

In Hungary, Scotch Pine can be harvested throughout the year, thus there is no dedicated harvest month or period. This year’s harvest yield is projected to be lower than that of the previous year; however, demands are still high for this oil.

Raspberry Seed Oil

In Chile, Raspberries are harvested from December to February or March. The current growing conditions are favorable and the harvest yield is projected to be similar to or higher than that of the previous year. There is good demand for the product, and the market conditions are good with high-quality supply and competitive prices.

Sea Buckthorn Oil

In China, Sea Buckthorn berries are harvested from October to January. The current growing conditions are the same as before, and the harvest yield is projected to be slightly higher than that of last year. The demand is increasing in China and Southeast Asia.

D-Limonene

In Brazil, Citrus fruits are harvested from June to February. The current growing conditions are favorable; however, this year’s harvest yield is projected to be slightly lower than that of last year. The demand and market conditions are weak. Buyers are advised to cover only what is required at the moment.

It’s Spring Cleaning Time!

Essential Oils for Home Cleaning

Here in Utah, the first day of spring isn’t quite full yet of all the gardening we’d like to do, but it is full of the promise that soon enough we’ll be out there once again, digging in the dirt! In the meantime, we’re opening the windows, letting the fresh air in, and doing some spring cleaning.

Look to your pantry to naturally clean your clothes and your home. Adding essential oils contributes antibacterial properties to your homemade cleaning agents and gives that oh-so-fresh-and-clean scent. This basic blend of oils is antibacterial and it smells divine!

Once you’ve made up a batch of the Antibacterial Essential Oil Blend, add it to the other recipes included for cleaners or create your own. Once you start creating your own cleaning products, you’ll discover just how easy it is to make cleaners that are truly clean.

Happy Cleaning! 

Antibacterial
Essential Oil Blend 

Ingredients 
40 drops clove oil
35 drops lemon oil
30 drops cinnamon oil
25 drops eucalyptus oil
20 drops rosemary oil
15 drops lavender oil
10 drops tea tree oil
10 drops peppermint oil

Instructions: Combine all oils in a light-proof bottle.

Foaming All-Purpose Paste Cleaner 

Ingredients 
baking soda
liquid castile soap
the antibacterial essential oil blend

Instructions 
Make a paste of equal parts baking soda and your favorite liquid castile soap. Adjust the ratio to your liking. Add a few drops of the essential oil blend. The baking soda is abrasive, so take care when cleaning delicate surfaces.
 – – – – – – –

Foaming All-Purpose Spray Cleaner 

Ingredients 
2 cups of water
1 tablespoon borax
2 tablespoons liquid castile soap
1 cup vinegar
20 drops antibacterial essential oil blend

Instructions 
Heat water and borax, and stir until borax is dissolved. Stir in liquid castile soap, vinegar, and antibacterial essential oil blend. Store in a spray bottle. To use, spray and wipe clean. The vinegar smell will dissipate shortly.

 

 

We made it through another winter!! It’s getting warmer, the days are getting longer, flowers are starting to bloom, and you’ll start to see butterflies and bees buzzing around.

I don’t know about you, but Spring is without a doubt my favorite season! I love all the bright colors, warmer weather, and all the wonderful smells Spring brings.

To make Spring even better (I know, how is that even possible?!) we are introducing a NEW limited time blend!! Trust me, you won’t want to miss out on this one!!

Leg Cramps are No Big Deal for This Essential Oil

Saro essential oil heard you sometimes have leg cramps.

It knows that you said the pain is “no big deal,” and Saro’s response is . . . neither is soothing the cramp!

Saro studied Massage in Madagascar, and it learned that easing muscle cramps is no big deal. It knows how to calm spasms, reduce inflammation, and create a sweet cooling sensation that can help muscles release tension naturally. Saro even learned to ease emotional stress that comes along with physical pain—its fresh aroma has a relaxing, uplifting effect.

For this recipe, Saro teamed up with friends that share its talents at caring for muscles. (And the Lemon and Cypress essential oils in this blend have an additional skill . . . they’re good for varicose veins!)

Leg Cramps are No Big Deal Oil

  • 1 oz (30 ml) jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis)
  • 7 drops Saro (Cinnamosma fragrans)
  • 5 drops Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile)
  • 2 drops Lemon (Citrus limon)
  • 4 drops Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)

Make this blend in a 1 oz (30 ml) glass bottle. Combine the jojoba and essential oils, and shake gently. (So easy! Making this blend is no big deal . . . haha!)

Any time you get a leg cramp, you can Massage it with this oil to help your muscle relax. If you get leg cramps at night you can use this oil before you go to bed, and keep the bottle on your nightstand in case a cramp wakes you up.

Even though this blend is “technically” for leg cramps, you can try it on any sore muscles you have. It’s helpful for tight shoulders, necks that don’t want to turn, or anytime you overdo it a little at the gym and feel achy and sore.

If your leg pain shows up more in your knees than your muscles (or both!), I have a Knee Pain Gel that I think you will really like. You can find it here on YouTube.

Make Fragrant Essential Oils: Warrior’s Spirit for Courage

This Warrior’s Spirit blend promotes courage and protection as well as physical and emotional support.

• 12 drops lavender oil
• 6 drops carrot seed oil
• 3 drops black pepper oil
• 3 drops angelica oil
• 3 drops myrrh oil
• 2 drops sage oil

Natural Perfumery

Craft evocative personal scents using natural ingredients, which lend delicate nuances to fragrances and evolve over time.

Thanks to the art and science of aromatherapy, we now appreciate the profound links between aroma and health; scents are processed in the amygdala, the same area of the brain that processes emotions. Because of the integration of scent and emotional processing, making natural perfume can contribute to our well-being. Perfume creation, which involves active olfaction and a total focus on the sense of smell, has been compared to concentrative meditation — it can help eliminate stress and bring about a sense of calm and peace. Not to mention, making perfume gives you the opportunity to develop your sense of smell!

Creating your own fragrances isn’t difficult. Maybe you already know that you prefer a certain type of perfume — an aroma that you identify with and that makes you feel good. Maybe you’d like to make a perfume to comfort, to uplift your spirits, to promote self-confidence, or for meditation. Or maybe you’d like to wear perfumes that reflect the season or evoke a specific mood. The possibilities are endless, and trying new combinations is part of the fun.

Natural Perfume Components

Natural perfumes made with essential oils and absolutes won’t be the same as commercial, alcohol-based perfumes. Essential oils are extracted from aromatic plants by steam distillation, or by physical expression, as in the case of citrus oils. Absolutes are made by solvent extraction; they’re aromatically similar to the plant but are very concentrated and best appreciated when highly diluted. Rose, jasmine, and orange blossom are the most popular absolutes. They’re expensive so you could use an infusion in jojoba oil as a budget-friendly alternative.

In mainstream perfumery, synthetic aroma chemicals dominate. This means that when a modern synthetic fragrance is applied, the effect is often linear — the perfume doesn’t substantially change its character from application until it has faded from our perception. The scent of perfumes made with extracts from aromatic plants, however, will evolve on our skin after application; we’ll first sense the top notes, then the middle notes at the heart of the scent, and finally the lingering base notes. Commercial perfumes are constructed for their initial impact and presence, their persistence, and for sillage — the trail of fragrance left in the air when the wearer walks by. Oil or wax-based natural perfumes are more subtle, and will usually fade more quickly. However, what’s lost in bombastic impact is more than made up for by the gentleness and beauty of naturally derived ingredients, and by the mood benefits of the aroma.

Fragrant Harmonies

Natural perfume isn’t composed randomly. To create a successful perfume, you’ll need to understand the olfactory relationships between essential oils, their volatility (which determines which scents are top, middle, and base notes), their diffusiveness, and their odor intensity.

The scent of every essential oil is made up of many chemical components, each of which has its own olfactory characteristics, and the components’ relative proportions have a major impact on the overall aroma of the oil. For this reason, some essential oils, such as rose or jasmine, are complex enough to make good single-ingredient fragrances, which are instantly recognizable. If you combine three essential oils, you create a new odor sensation, although you’ll still be able to discern the presence of the individual oils. But by combining five or more oils, you’ll create a completely new scent, which we’ll struggle to discern the individual ingredients of because hundreds of chemicals will be constituents contributing to the aroma.

In perfume, the initial impact is given by the “top note,” or the aromatics that evaporate most quickly; the heart of the scent is composed of “middle note” aromatics, defining the theme of the perfume; and less volatile “base note” aromatics anchor or fix the scent, giving it persistence. The oil or wax base of a natural perfume will also decelerate evaporation to an extent, which is why a natural perfume takes a little longer to make its presence known. By contrast, alcohol-based conventional perfumes are highly volatile.

In addition to the broad top, middle, or base category a particular aromatic might belong to, aromatic connections will be running throughout the perfume, because many essential oils share aromatic constituents. These form what we might think of as aromatic bridges, which will bring cohesiveness and harmony to your blend; aromatic contrasts will add drama and excitement.

Choose a Theme

When crafting a personal scent, you might want to create a soliflore, where one floral fragrance dominates; or a more sophisticated bouquet, which might be floral, herbal, or based on fragrant woods, soothing balsams, citrus, or vanilla. Each of these ideas can be fused so you might choose a floral-balsamic composition or an herbal-woody-spicy scent.

You can also create a more abstract scent that reflects seasons, places, or feelings. Evoke a walk in the forest with conifer oils or a tropical garden with sumptuous ylang-ylang. You could even use vanilla and citrus to make a fragrance inspired by the aroma of cakes baking!

Follow Your Nose

Top notes: Citrus is commonly used as a top note, because of its high volatility. Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) has a fresh citrus top note and sweet citrus body, with lemony, floral, peppery, and lavender-like nuances — elements that can bridge with many other scents. Use the furanocoumarin-free (FCF) version to eliminate the risk of phototoxicity, which is a burning reaction from topically applied essential oils that are triggered by exposure to sunlight. Other citrus top notes include yellow grapefruit (C. paradisi) for sharpness, lime (C. aurantifolia) for lightness, mandarin (C. reticulata) for freshness, and yuzu peel (C. junos) if you like a stronger aromatic citrus presence. Many citrus essential oils and aromatics are phototoxic, though the risk is minimized by using steam-distilled essential oils; research the aromatic you plan to use before adding it to a scent.

Herbal top notes give freshness to a blend; try using bergamot mint (Mentha citrata), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), and petitgrain (C. aurantium).

Floral top notes include the green scent of neroli (steam-distilled C. aurantium var. amara) and damask rose (Rosa x damascena), which gives a gentle freshness, lift, and harmony.

Spicy top notes include black pepper (Piper nigrum) for light warmth and lift, and caraway seed (Carum carvi) for sweet warmth and intrigue. Versatile coriander seed (Coriandrum sativum), with sweet, spicy, woody, floral, and citrus notes, can act as a bridge.

Middle notes: Floral heart notes can be as defining or as subtle as you wish. Heady Jasminum grandiflorum absolute should be used sparingly for its intense, diffusive, warm floral fragrance. Like rose and orange blossom absolutes, it makes for a classic floral heart. Arabian jasmine (Jasminum sambac) is intensely sensual, and it makes a good soliflore. Rose absolute (Rosa x centifolia) will make a smooth, rich, sweet soliflore, or can be the dominant floral in a composition. In small amounts, its delicacy can transform fragrances. Orange blossom absolute (solvent-distilled from Citrus aurantium var. amara) is a rich and heavy floral that should be used sparingly. It can make an interesting soliflore with neroli as a top note. A little ylang-ylang extra (Cananga odorata var. genuina) goes a long way; it’s diffusive, sweet, rich, and tropical. In small amounts, it lifts and harmonizes blends.

For an herbal heart, try sweet, fresh lavender absolute; rose geranium (Pelargonium spp.); or sweet, diffusive Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) for its apple notes.

Citrus oils evaporate quickly, making them difficult to use in the heart of a scent. However, litsea (Litsea cubeba) is fresh, sweet, sharp, and lemony, and has reasonable tenacity.

Spicy oils make good partners for flowers and woods and can sit within the heart of a perfume. Clove Bud (Eugenia caryophyllata) is perfect for spicing up rose fragrances. Use it minimally; the scent is powerful, and the oil can irritate the skin. Cinnamon leaf (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) should also be used sparingly.

Woods and resins for heart notes include Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens), which imparts woody and smoky notes; Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana), which gives a mild “pencil shavings” aroma; and frankincense (Boswellia carterii), which offers a fresh, resinous effect. Both frankincense and Eastern red cedar reach the top notes while staying in the heart. Frankincense suffers from overharvesting for the essential oil trade, so be sure to seek out sustainably sourced oil if you wish to use it. Conifers usually make their presence felt in top notes, but are tenacious enough to stay in the heart.

Base notes: These oils all act as fixatives as well as fragrance elements. If you’re looking for a balsamic, ambery, rich effect, try the resin of rock rose (Cistus ladanifer) or myrrh (Commiphora myrrha).

Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin) is distinctive and complex and will add character to blends with its persistent, earthy, herbaceous notes. Vetiver (Vetivera zizanoides) is a rich, sweet, woody, earthy aroma, with remarkably persistent musky notes.

Sandalwood (Santalum album) is the base of many traditional attars; blend it with rose or jasmine to create a simple, beautiful scent. The scent is sweetly woody and persistent, with balsamic and musky notes. Sandalwood is often overharvested in the wild; seek sustainable sources for this oil.

Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) is sweet, rich, and warm, with woody and even tobacco notes. The solvent-extracted absolute is quite expensive, so the budget-friendly way to use it is to buy vanilla-infused jojoba oil, to which you can add your other ingredients.

The given recipes are only a few examples of perfumes you can create. Adapt them to suit what you have available — or what you prefer — and don’t be afraid to substitute fragrances or vary the proportions of aromatics. Enjoy; it’s your perfume!

Natural Oil-Based Roll-On Perfume Recipe

This oil-based roll-on perfume recipe is easy to adjust to your personal fragrance preferences, and fragrance-infused carrier oils expand the possibilities.

Yield: 0.35 ounces (10 milliliters) liquid perfume.

 

Pack your preferred personal scent into a roller ball bottle to have on hand throughout the day. Note that the provided measurements will give a concentration of around 5 percent essential oils. You shouldn’t use more than 2 drops of absolute per 0.35 ounces (10 milliliters) of carrier oil.

Ingredients:

  • 10 drops essential oils and absolutes (see “Oil-Based Perfume Variations,” below)
  • 0.35 ounces (10 milliliters) jojoba oil
  • A colored-glass roller-ball bottle

Instructions:

  1. Add your heart notes directly into the bottle, and smell as you go, in case you need to adjust.
  2. Next, add the base notes, and, again, remember to smell after every drop. You can always add more, but you can’t subtract.
  3. Finally, add your top notes.
  4. When you’re happy with the aroma, fill the bottle to the shoulder with jojoba oil, fit on the roller ball and lid, and invert the bottle gently several times to thoroughly distribute the oils in the jojoba.
  5. Give your composition a name, label the bottle, and note the formula.

Oil-Based Perfume Variations

Essential oils are extremely concentrated and must be sufficiently diluted in a carrier oil to be used safely on your skin. Don’t adjust the proportion of aromatics to carrier oil in these recipes. All the following quantities are calculated for 0.35 ounces (10 milliliters) of liquid perfume.


Tropical Flowers

Top: 2 drops lime

Heart: 3 drops ylang-ylang

Base: 5 drops sandalwood

Variation: Use vanilla-infused jojoba as the carrier for a creamy effect.


Herbal Bouquet

Top: 3 drops bergamot mint, 2 drops rose, and 2 drops lavender

Heart: 1 drop rose geranium, 1 drop Roman chamomile, and (optional) 1 drop lavender absolute

Base: 1 drop patchouli or vetiver


Meditation

Top: 2 drops Bergamot and 2 drops neroli

Heart: 2 drops frankincense

Base: 2 drops Myrrh and 2 drops sandalwood

Your Guide to Vegan Skin Care

Today it’s easier than ever to choose a lifestyle that aligns with your health goals and ethical choices. If you’re a vegetarian, you avoid meat and fish and opt instead for plant-based foods, dairy, and eggs. A vegan diet takes things a step further, eschewing all products associated with animals, including animal-derived ingredients like milk, eggs, and honey.

For homemade natural beauty recipes, which often use dairy as a base for creams and lotions, finding a non-animal option may seem tricky But we actually have quite a few plant-derived substances from which to choose, whether it’s agave, natural plant oils like olive or grape seed, or nut milk. These types of ingredients can help you maintain beautiful skin and healthy, shiny hair – without having to compromise your values. Here are a few all-natural, all- vegan recipes to get you started.

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Shea Butter Body Lotion

From the African shea tree {Vitellaria paradoxa, formerly Butyrospermum parkii}, shea butter is an ivory-colored natural fat used much like cocoa butter, with a mild, almost musty fragrance. In cosmetics, it acts as a moisturizer and emollient and also contains anti-inflammatory properties. It can treat all types of skin conditions, from scars to chapped lips, and it’s helpful in treating acne because it’s easily absorbed by the skin and leaves no sticky residue. It also provides mild UV protection from the sun {but should never serve as a replacement for your sunscreen}. You can find it in natural food stores in the skincare section.

1/2 cup distilled water

1/8 tsp borax powder

1/4 cup shea butter

1/2 cup almond oil

Bring water to a boil. Place borax powder in a clean, heat-proof bowl, and pour in the boiling water, stirring well. Set aside. In a microwave-safe bowl or saucepan, combine oil and shea butter and gently heat the mixture until melted, stirring to mix. Transfer this mixture into a blender or food processor and blend on low, slowly adding the hot water solution in a slow, steady stream. Then blend on high until well-mixed. You should have a milky-white lotion. Pour the mixture into a clean container to cool.

To Use Massage into skin. Yields: 6 ounces.

Plant-Based Lip Balm

Several plant oils and waxes work great as substitutes for beeswax or lanolin to soothe dry, cracked lips. The shea butter, cocoa butter, coconut oil, and castor oil in this recipe provides lips with natural shine and protection against the element.

1/2 tsp castor oil

1 tsp coconut oil

1 tsp shea butter

1/2 tsp cocoa butter

1-2 drops peppermint essential oil for flavor {optional}

In a heat-resistant bowl or small saucepan, combine all ingredients and gently heat until melted. {This may be done in the microwave, but be careful not to boil the mixture.} Stir well and pour into a small container. Let cool completely.

To Use Spread on your lips with a clean fingertip. Yield: .75 ounce.

Coconut Oil Body Polish

This scrub is perfect for skin that needs some exfoliation, but also a bit of TLC. The raw sugar exfoliates the skin while the coconut oil helps deeply condition it. After using this treatment, your skin should feel softer and smoother.

1 cup of raw sugar

1/2 cup coconut oil

1/2 tsp vitamin E oil

2-3 drops essential oil {lavender, rosemary, peppermint} optional

In a small bowl, mix together all ingredients and stir well. Spoon into a clean container.

To Use: Standing in the tub or shower, massage the mixture into your skin. {Be careful: the oil can make the tub slippery.} Rinse with warm water and pat your skin dry. Yield: 8 ounces.

Easy Dry Shampoo

Dry shampoos have become a popular alternative to regular “wet” shampoos, proving especially helpful after a workout during the day or when traveling. But spray-on dry shampoos can contain a wealth of questionable ingredients, when, in fact, all you really need is one tablespoon of either baking soda, cornstarch, or rice powder. That’s it…

To Use: Simply massage the powder directly onto your scalp and through your hair. You may want to lean over a sink as you apply the powder. Leave it on for at least 10 minutes, and then, using a clean, dry brush, vigorously brush your hair, using long strokes, to remove all of the powder.

Reading the Labels

Our skin is our largest organ, and what you use on it does affect your overall health. One advantage of making your own cosmetic products and treatments is that it puts you in control of the ingredients you use and apply to your skin. Of course, you don’t always have time to make all of your skincare products from scratch. So, knowing how to accurately read the labels of store-bought products becomes important.

To start, the term “natural” on the label is meaningless – there’s no authority that monitors this claim. Therefore, you really need to take an eagle eye to the back of the product. Ingredients are listed in order of percentage: if the first ingredient is water, that means water is the most prominent ingredient. You may see a product that boasts a desirable ingredient on the front label, only to find that it’s the last ingredient listed.

Some ingredients such as “sodium chloride” may sound scary {at least to those who’ve long forgotten their chemistry lessons}, but are, in fact, completely natural {sodium chloride is table salt}. Manufacturers often use scientific or Latin names for basic ingredients, but a quick search online can reveal the common name and whether it’s an ingredient you want to put on your skin.

Vegans may not realize that some of their favorite products actually contain ingredients they wish to avoid. Here’s a quick list of animal-derived substances.

  • Aspic: an industry alternative to gelatin; made from clarified meat or fish
  • Casein: a protein derived from milk
  • Cod liver oil: found in lubricating creams and lotions
  • Collagen: taken from the bones and connective tissues of animals; used in cosmetics to help skin retain water and keep it supple
  • Elastin: similar use as collagen; derived from the neck ligaments and aorta of cows
  • Gelatin/Gelatine: for smooth skin and to add gloss to hair; obtained by boiling skin, tendons, ligaments, and/or bones from cows and pigs
  • Keratin: used for hair and as an anti-aging skin care ingredient; obtained from sheep wool or from the skin, hooves, and horns of animals
  • Lactose: a sugar derived from milk
  • Propolis: used for its antiviral and antimicrobial properties to treat breakouts and protect skin; created by bees in the construction of their hives
  • Royal Jelly: an anti-aging ingredient; comes from secretions of the throat gland of the honeybee
  • Shellac: found in hair lacquer; obtained from the bodies of the female scale insect, Tachardia lacca
  • Vitamin D3: found in creams, lotions, and other cosmetics; made from fish-liver oil
  • Whey: a byproduct of cheese making
  • Cochineal dye or carminic acid: adds red color; comes from the cochineal insect
  • Ambergris: adds scent and/or color; derived from whales

Garden Fresh Vegan Cologne

This fragrance uses fresh vegetable and herb leaves to create a light, summer-garden scent. Try it as an after-bath or after-shave splash – or anytime you need an aromatic boost.

4 Tbls fresh tomato leaves, chopped

1 Tbls fresh lemon zest

1 tsp fresh basil leaves

1 tsp fresh mint leaves

1 cup witch hazel

Place all of the fresh leaves and lemon zest inside a clean jar or bottle. Pour the witch hazel over; shake gently. Cover the bottle top and let it sit in a cool, dark spot for two weeks. Strain the liquid and discard any solids. Pour the liquid through a fine strainer or coffee filter into a clean bottle.

To Use: Apply as you would any cologne product. It’s especially refreshing on a hot summer day if kept in the refrigerator. Yield: 8 ounces.

Avocado Facial Mask

Fresh avocados are a classic facial mask ingredient full of natural fats and protein to help stimulate your skin’s own natural production of oil, helping to smooth out rough, dry skin. All skin types can benefit from an avocado facial. Make sure to save the pit; you can grind it up and use it in body scrub recipes, and if you live somewhere warm, you can plant it to have your own little avocado tree.

1/2 fresh avocado, mashed

1 Tbls fresh parsley leaves, finely chopped

1 tsp fresh lemon juice

Combine all of the ingredients in a small bowl and stir well until you have a smooth, creamy mixture.

To Use: Spread the mask on a clean face and neck and let sit for 15 minutes. {Take this moment to relax!} Rinse with warm water and gently pat your skin dry. Yield: 3 ounces, enough for one treatment.

Vegan Substitutions

Need to find a substitute for an ingredient in one of your beauty recipes? Several plant substances serve as effective replacements for some common ingredients derived from animals.

  • Beeswax: Heavy plant waxes, such as candelilla and carnauba, and oils like coconut can stand in for beeswax, which is used to thicken creams, lotions, and lip balms and help protect your skin. Cocoa and shea butters also work well.
  • Dairy: Today, you can find a wide variety of plant and nut milks to replace animal dairy called for in beauty recipes.
  • Egg white: This part of the egg provides astringent and cleansing qualities for oily skin types, but cucumber, chamomile tea, and aloe vera gel will work similarly.
  • Egg yolks: Full of lecithin, egg yolks help with dry skin conditions, but you can replace them with soy lecithin or use a rich oil such as coconut and olive instead.
  • Honey: In place of honey to cleanse and moisturize your skin look to molasses, maple syrup, or agave syrup.
  • Lanolin: Found in sheep’s wool, lanolin can be replaced with rich plant oils such as soy, almond, and avocado.

 

Rosewood Oil: “Bois-de-Rose” Benefits

Prized as a decorative tree and used to make furniture, chopsticks, and show pieces, rosewood is a versatile and durable tree that grows abundantly in Brazil. But rosewood is more than just a raw material used in manufacturing. The popular fragrant oil of the same name is extracted from its wood. Keep on reading to learn more about rosewood oil.

What Is Rosewood Oil?

rosewood oilRosewood oil is extracted from Aniba rosaeodora, an evergreen tree that’s indigenous to Peru and Brazil. Rosewood, also called “bois-de-rose,” is a member of the Laurel (Lauraceae) plant family along with camphor, cinnamon, bay, and cassia. This aromatic tree can grow up to 40 meters high and is distinguishable by its reddish bark and yellow flowers. Many rosewood rain forests have been cut down to accommodate the high demand for this sturdy lumber, although legislation now requires planting a new rosewood in place of every tree that’s been cut down.

Rosewood oil has a characteristic aroma that’s warm, spicy, woody, fruity, floral, and enlivening. This characteristic aroma makes it an established ingredient in high-class perfumery and soap-making, especially during the early 1900’s, which caused deforestation of the tree.

Due to rosewood oil’s high price, however, manufacturers turned to cheaper alternatives, such as Chinese Ho oils from Cinnamomum camphora, as well as synthetic linalool. This allowed rosewood forests to thrive once again.

Uses of Rosewood Oil

Rosewood oil’s alluring fragrance has been widely lauded in the perfume industry, but its therapeutic properties are less well known. Aromatherapists use it to help treat depression, as it is said to impart feelings of happiness and strength. Rosewood oil also calms the mind and prompts hormone secretion. It also works as an aphrodisiac as it stimulates your body and libido allowing you to relax and let go of stress and mental clutter.

Another popular use of rosewood oil is for skin care. It has tissue-regenerating properties that help prevent wrinkles and premature aging, and also works well for preventing a variety of skin conditions. You can use it to reduce the onset of pimples, acne, and blackheads while controlling the amount of sebum secreted by your oil glands. Rosewood oil also has wound-healing actions, making it an ideal first-aid remedy for cuts and insect bites.

To get rosewood oil’s therapeutic effects, you can:

  • Diffuse it using a vaporizer.
  • Dilute it in a carrier oil, and then place a drop or two on your skin or the affected areas that need healing. Note: DO NOT use it on facial skin without diluting it in a mild carrier oil first. You can also use it as a massage oil.
  • Add it to your bathwater. Use it while showering: after soaking for at least 3 minutes in steamy shower, turn the water off, put five to seven drops of the oil in the palm of your hand, and distribute it all over your wet body. The oil will penetrate very quickly and you can rinse it off if you prefer.
  • Mix it your favorite lotion or cream. Add a drop or two to your favorite moisturizer to reap its anti-aging benefits.

Rosewood oil also works as an effective insect repellent that repels mosquitoes, bugs, and ants. It can also work as a room freshener. Simply add 15 drops per 2 ounces of distilled water, and then spray as desired.

The Composition of Rosewood Oil

Rosewood oil’s high linalool content (86 percent) makes it highly useful for industrial applications. Linalool is modified into many derivatives that are essential to the food flavoring and fragrance industries.

Meanwhile, other components of rosewood oil like a-pinene, a-terpineol, camphene, neral, myrcene, geranial, 1,8-cineole, benzaldehyde, linalool oxides, and limonene  are responsible for its health-promoting effects. This oil works as a stimulant, antidepressant, analgesic, antibacterial, and antiseptic.

Benefits of Rosewood Oil

rosewood oil benefitsI believe that rosewood oil is a wonderful herbal oil to have at home, as its sweet and pleasant aroma can greatly delight your senses. However, there’s a lot more to this oil than its enticing aroma. Here are some of the benefits of rosewood oil:

  • Relieves pain. Rosewood oil is a mild analgesic (not as strong as other herbal oils) that can help alleviate headaches, toothaches, and muscle and joint pain.
  • Heals wounds. This oil’s antiseptic properties help prevent wounds and cuts from getting infected, as well as stimulate faster healing.
  • Helps treat colds, coughs, and sinusitis. It has the ability to regulate smooth muscle contractions, helping control bronchial disorders such as asthma.
  • Works as an aphrodisiac and stress reliever. It can help treat impotence or frigidity, arousing sexual desire and improving sexual performance. Rosewood oil’s fragrance also has a calming and relaxing effect on your mind and body.

How to Make Rosewood Oil

Rosewood oil is extracted from the wood chippings or shavings of the rosewood trunk. This oil is produced via steam distillation, which works by vaporizing the oil and the active ingredients in it so they can be extracted and condensed. This extraction method helps assure that you are getting a pure and high-quality rosewood oil.

I advise you to be very stringent when buying rosewood oil, as some brands may be adulterated or have been infused with other carrier oils, which will lower the potency. Choosing a  rosewood oil that’s produced by a reputable manufacturer is crucial

How Does Rosewood Oil Work?

Rosewood oil’s high alpha-pinene content is responsible for its impressive antibacterial properties, while the chemical components geraniol, nerol, 8-cineole, linalool, and limonene are useful for tissue regeneration. Studies have also shown that the topical use of rosewood oil can help destroy pre-cancerous and cancerous cells without adversely affecting healthy skin cells.

To take full advantage of its therapeutic benefits, Rosewood oil can be applied topically, inhaled, or vaporized. It is rarely taken orally. As with other herbal oils, I do not recommend ingesting or applying this oil without the supervision of a qualified health practitioner.

Is Rosewood Oil Safe?

side effects of rosewood oilRosewood Oil is may be highly beneficial, as long as it’s used in moderation and properly diluted. It blends well with citrus oils like orange, neroli, bergamot, lime, lemon, and grapefruit, as well as floral oils like lavender, jasmine, and rose.

Rosewood oil is non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. However, I still advise doing a skin patch test before using this herbal oil.

Side Effects of Rosewood Oil

Rosewood oil has no known side effects. But despite its safe profile, children, pregnant women or nursing moms should not use this oil without the advice of their physician. Rosewood oil, especially at full strength, is not recommended for very young children as well.

People with sensitive skin should also be careful when using rosewood oil. If you see any signs of irritation after using this oil, stop using it immediately and contact your health care provider.

Rose Skin Care Recipes

Rose Water-Glycerin Lotion

It is possible that this herbal skin conditioner will be much loved by your grandmother. In effect, this traditionally prepared herbal mix is not only a very effectual essential moisturizer, but it is also a preferred hand lotion. Although one variety of this herbal skin care product is available with the drugstores, if you wish to prepare one personally, you are able to change the ratio of the ingredients with a view to going well with your skin as well as the changing condition of your skin depending on the seasonal changes.

The basic ingredients of this preparation are very common, such as:

  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) of rose water
  • 1/4 cup of glycerin

To prepare this herbal skin care product, you are free to use ready rose water or make it personally be adding one teaspoon of rose oil to half a cup of distilled water. Mix the rose water and glycerin till it turns into a soft and cream-like blend. Finally, pour the creamy mixture into a spotless bottle and seal it tightly.

A thinner rose water-glycerin cream is recommended for people with oily skin. To prepare this thinner lotion, blend the two-third cup of rose water with two tablespoonfuls of glycerin. Conversely, a more dense lotion is apt for people having dry skin. To prepare this thick rose water-glycerin lotion to blend 1/3 cup of rose water with one-third or extra glycerin.

Rose water-glycerin gel: To prepare a gel using rose water and glycerin, you need to liquefy one teaspoon of ordinary gelatin in half a cup (125 ml) of hot water. Next, mix one teaspoon of rose oil and three tablespoons of glycerin thoroughly.

Glycerin and Rose Water Cleansing Cream

Glycerin and rosewater cleansing cream is effective for both dry and normal skin conditions. The ingredients needed to prepare this herbal product include:

  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) of rose water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of glycerin
  • 4 tablespoons (60 ml) of lanolin
  • 6 drops of essential oil of rose
  • 2 oz (50 ml) of almond oil

First, liquefy the lanolin in an open saucepan and heat the almond oil and glycerin in another pan over the same heat. Blend the two and keep stirring them gently constantly. Next, gradually add rose water to the blend and allow it to cool. When the mixture has cooled down, stir the essential oil of rose into it.

Rose Water-Glycerin Lotion

It is possible that this herbal skin conditioner will be much loved by your grandmother. In effect, this traditionally prepared herbal mix is not only a very effectual essential moisturizer, but it is also a preferred hand lotion. Although one variety of this herbal skin care product is available with the drugstores, if you wish to prepare one personally, you are able to change the ratio of the ingredients with a view to going well with your skin as well as the changing condition of your skin depending on the seasonal changes.

The basic ingredients of this preparation are very common, such as:

  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) of rose water
  • 1/4 cup of glycerin

To prepare this herbal skin care product, you are free to use ready rose water or make it personally be adding one teaspoon of rose oil to half a cup of distilled water. Mix the rose water and glycerin till it turns into a soft and cream-like blend. Finally, pour the creamy mixture into a spotless bottle and seal it tightly.

A thinner rose water-glycerin cream is recommended for people with oily skin. To prepare this thinner lotion, blend the two-third cup of rose water with two tablespoonfuls of glycerin. Conversely, a more dense lotion is apt for people having dry skin. To prepare this thick rose water-glycerin lotion to blend 1/3 cup of rose water with one-third or extra glycerin.

Rose water-glycerin gel: To prepare a gel using rose water and glycerin, you need to liquefy one teaspoon of ordinary gelatin in half a cup (125 ml) of hot water. Next, mix one teaspoon of rose oil and three tablespoons of glycerin thoroughly.

Rose Water and Witch Hazel Toning Lotion

To prepare a toning lotion with rose water and witch hazel, you require the following ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoonfuls (60 ml) of rose water
  • 4 tablespoonfuls (60 ml) of witch hazel infusion
  • 4 tablespoonfuls (60 ml) of lemon juice
  • 3 drops of the essential oil of lavender

Blend all the ingredients mentioned above together and bottle up the mixture. Prior to using this toner, shake the bottle well every time. This toner will facilitate in reinstating the acid skin layer, tauten as well as refresh the skin and also close the unnecessary pores.

Warm infusions of many herbs may be employed in the form of skin fresheners. Some of these herbs include chamomile, mint, fennel, yarrow, lady’s mantle, sage, and elderflower. You may include a couple of drops of the tincture of benzoin in every cup of the infusion with a view to preserving the liniment for a longer period.

Rose and Honey Lotion

Witch hazel and rose lotion is a moisturizer suitable for every skin type and can be prepared using the following ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 teaspoonfuls (7.5 ml) of witch hazel infusion
  • 1 teaspoonful (5 ml) of almond oil
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of honey
  • 1 teaspoonful (5 ml) of rose water

First, warm all the ingredients and blend them in a glass jar. Seal the lid of the jar tightly and shake the jar thoroughly prior to use.