Geranium Essential Oil: Creating A Complete Balance

There is so much to say about the “flower of constancy”. Its elegant aroma is fresh, green and sweet with a strong rose note. Its sweetness increases as it evaporates into the atmosphere. A strong oil that is also light and soft at the same time that eases mental stress and worries, while lifting the spirits. So, did that grab your attention to want to know more? This is one of my all-time favorite Essential Oils that I keep in my travel kit. I make sure I never run out of Geranium Essential Oil.

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The oil is distilled from the leaves. The name Geranium derives from the Greek word geranos or ‘crane’ because the seed pods resemble the shape of crane’s bills. It has been used widely in perfumery and soap manufacturing since the 19th century. There are more than 700 varieties of Geranium, however, only about 10 provide the Essential Oil. In the Victorian era, scented Geraniums were grown along the edges of pathways or placed pots indoors in the winter where women’s wide crinoline skirts would brush past and release their pleasant scent. Who would have thought that people went to such great lengths to steal these precious flowers from others gardens just to get their hands on them? There is something addicting about Geranium…

Regenerate Your Body and Mind

Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) is considered among Aromatherapists as oil to promote overall balance. Geranium has a way of transmitting feelings of strength and security, therefore used to calm both chronic and acute anxieties as well as depression; especially involving exhaustion and fatigue due to over-work. It is used to reconnect us to “feeling life”. Because life can throw us a lot of curve balls, Geranium can help us reconnect emotionally and start to “feel” again…to have a thirst for life and its enjoyments or pleasures. It can bring us back to center, grounding us to help us see things clearly and take charge.

This majestic oil can help balance emotions and promote a sense of inner peace and well-being. Being sedative and uplifting when needed, it is an ideal essential oil for stress-related disorders such as tension headaches, anxiety/depression, agitation, mood swings, frustration, fatigue, and muscle aches.

Be Productive

Do you ever get that feeling of being “stuck”? This oil is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to strengthen the flow of Qi-energy and is blood circulating, and also helps to clear and dispel stagnation. This makes it especially helpful for you to put your visions and thoughts into action.

Reproductive and Endocrine System* 

Geranium is used in Traditional Aromatherapy to help cope with hormonal imbalances during menopause and PMS and the baggage that comes with it such as hot flashes, menstrual cramps, water retention, mood swings and more. It supports the adrenal cortex to help balance the hormones. It is famous in Aromatherapy to help cool a hot temper! Because it helps us to release tension and negative emotions, it can be used to encourage feelings of sensuality as well.

Beauty

Geranium Essential Oil is commonly used by skin care specialist during facials because it is very nourishing and balancing to the skin. It is soothing to the mucous membranes and helps to cleanse and balance sebum production from oily to dry skin while restoring tone. It makes a great body treatment or massage oil for cellulite. Geranium Essential Oil is one of the few that has been used successfully against the MRSA bacteria in laboratory studies.

A Perfect Fit

Geranium blends well with many oils including Bergamot, Lemon, Grapefruit, Lavender, Clary Sage, Orange, Peppermint,  Frankincense, Jasmine, Rose, Ylang Ylang, Roman Chamomile, and Eucalyptus.

Geranium Essential Oil’s benefits in Aromatherapy are so diverse. From balancing the body and mind, easing nervous tension and anxiety*, to promoting productivity when feeling “stuck,” Geranium Essential Oil helps to put us back on track where we want to be. Its aroma is strong, sweet, yet at the same time is elegant and soft. It has “Yin” properties; therefore it’s a superb oil for women to keep in their Essential Oil kit.

Since there are so many great benefits from the “oil of balance” I wanted to share some very useful recipes that you can incorporate into your Aromatherapy life.

Soothe the Skin: Use in the bath or massage on the body.
4 drops Geranium
2 drops Frankincense
1 Tbsp. Almond Oil

Peaceful Sleep: Add the following to the diffuser in your bedroom.
3 drops Geranium
2 drops Lavender
1 drop Orange

A Brush of Ahhh: To refresh your mind and/or intrigue your partner, add one drop to your hairbrush and brush into your hair.

Body powder– To feel beautiful and sensual mix the following in jar with a tight lid, and allow to sit for a day before using.
5 drops Geranium
2 drops Ylang Ylang
¼ cup Corn Starch or Arrow Root Powder

Chill Out Bath: Calm Irritability, sit back, relax and inhale. Mix with 1 cup Epsom salts + 1 tbsp castile soap + Apricot Carrier Oil (or any carrier oil of your choice)
4 drops Geranium
4 drops Tangerine
2 drops Lavender
1 tablespoon Apricot Carrier Oil

Balancing & Uplifting Massage & Body Oil: This makes an excellent massage oil to promote Geranium’s balancing properties while helping release overall tension. Mix the following in a 2 oz. amber glass bottle.
8 drops Geranium
6 drops Lavender
5 drops Bergamot
4 drops Grapefruit
2 oz. Grapeseed Oil or any carrier oil of your choice

Bye, Bye Baby Blues– A blend that can help moms cope with post-natal blues. Make a body oil by diluting in 2 oz. of your favorite carrier oil (ex. Almond, Grapeseed, Olive) inside an amber glass bottle. You may also use as a diffuser blend by mixing 2 drops of each.
10 drops Geranium
10 drops Grapefruit
5 drops Orange

Anxiety Ease Blends– Use the formulas below as you wish in the bath, in your diffuser or as a massage oil.

Massage Oil – Dilute in 1 oz. carrier oil (ex. Almond, Grapeseed, Olive) inside an amber glass bottle. Gently massage over your pulse points, abdomen and behind your neck and shoulders.
3 drops Geranium
4 drops Clary Sage
7 drops Bergamot

Diffuser
3 drops Geranium
1 drop Clary Sage
3 drops Bergamot

Bath
Mix with 1 cup Epsom salts + 1 tbsp castile soap:

•4 drops Geranium
•4 drops Bergamot
•2 drops Clary Sage

Inner Peace – Diffuse in the air of a sense of calm and to promote happiness.
2 drops Geranium
2 drops Frankincense
2 drops Orange

Geranium is wonderful, isn’t it?! What do you like to do with it? Please let us know in the comment section down below.

Market Report July 2018 {Essential Oils, Carrier Oils, Raw Materials}

The following report contains updates on the current trends in production and availability of the most in-demand Essential Oils, Carrier Oils, and Raw Materials sourced from around the globe.

Mint-leaves-2007

 

Mint (Mentha Arvensis & Menthol Oils)

In India, the main growing region for Mint is expected to experience a normal Monsoon season; however, there has been a delay in the onset of this beneficial rainy weather, which usually makes its appearance in mid-June. This postponement, likely to July, is not expected to have a significant negative impact on the production of Mint.

Between 2017-18, the production of Mint was approximately 30,000MT with a carryover stock of 6,000MT, making the total availability of 36,000MT. A decline in the carryover stocks and a strong export demand in the Indian market has led to an increase in Mint prices. India is expected to yield 35,000MT to 38,000MT of Mint Oil in 2018-19 if everything goes normal. Due to a major, worldwide shortage of Mint, there has been growing demand. Hence, throughout the year, there has been an upward trend in Mint prices.

lavandin-sumian

Lavandin Oil

In France, the Lavandin harvest occurs between mid-July and mid-August, with harvest and distillation taking place at the same time. Compared to the weather of 2017, which was characterized by a drought and freezing temperatures that destroyed 10-15% of the plantation and resulted in the crop having to be uprooted and replaced, the weather this year has been favorable for Lavandin cultivation. The months of April and May experienced plenty of rainfall, promoting the growth of lush fields. Due to the introduction of new plants in the production phase, there may still be a lack of material in 2018-2019 despite the possibility of having a favorable yield. In the South of France and in Spain, the temperatures are currently on the cooler end of the range, which will delay the harvest by a few weeks.

Last year, the harvest yield for Lavandin Grosso was around 1300 tons, which was unfortunately not enough. At this time, it is too soon to project this year’s harvest yield in France, but it is likely to be the same as last year, considering the drought in the growing regions. It is still not known how this will affect the yield, production, or prices in Spain. In France, the market demand for Lavandin is still very high, and with all the crops having been sold during the year, there is no leftover. In France, there has been a slight increase in price, as there is more demand than there is production. Due to the lack of stock, the market is tense.

lavandula-angustifolia-mill

Lavender Oil

In Bulgaria, the current unfavorable weather, which is characterized by rainstorms and icy rain, is leading to the destruction of many crops, including Lavender. The distillation yield is also very low, which indicates that there will be a shortage of oil volumes from Bulgaria. Subsequently, this will cause an increase in prices for both organic and conventional Lavender. Normal weather patterns were expected along with a large crop, which may have yielded over 400 tons of oil, but the rain that began at the end of June and that has continued until now, has caused most planting areas to be inundated; thus, the main issue continues to be the availability of the crop, which is down a minimum of 50%. As expected, the current demand for Lavender is remarkably high. Ukrainian and Russian producers are facing the same situation, having had to stop their production due to heavy rainfall.

neroli flowers

 

Neroli Oil

In Tunisia, favorable weather conditions have benefited the Neroli harvest, leading to a consistent and abundant yield. There has been a high market demand for Neroli, and the distillers’ eagerness to buy led to an increase in Neroli prices throughout the harvest, causing the prices to reach a historic high. The distillation yields have remained at average levels. Compared to previous years, the concrete production of Neroli has been stable; however, the steady demand has led to a 20% increase in prices. Tunisian production volumes are stable and could potentially increase in the coming years, due to new planting projects that are currently in progress.

In Morocco, the Neroli harvest took place under unfavorable weather conditions characterized by low temperatures, frequent rain, and little sunlight. Although the harvest season usually ends in early May, the latest harvest season was exceptionally long, lasting from the end of April to mid-May. Although the rainfall and cold temperatures negatively impacted the distillation yields, which saw a decline of nearly 40% below normal levels, there was a decent volume of harvested blossoms. This year’s Moroccan production volumes are below market expectations, due to the weather conditions; however, there has been an upward trend in production.

Litsea Cubeba oil

Litsea Cubeba Oil

In China, crop seeding for Litsea Cubeba will begin at the end of July, and new oil will become available between the end of August and early September. The crop sizes are expected to be the same as last year’s, that is, not large. Due to high labor and production costs, the pricing is expected to stay firm for new crops, and according to some reports, there is little urgency for farmers to collect.

Pelargonium_graveolens_5

Geranium Oil

In China, the rainy weather has prevented further production of new Geranium Essential Oil. The oil from the early season was low in Geraniol content, not having more than 4%, thus the carryover – with 6% Geraniol – was priced much higher. According to reports, the current demand is low, suggesting that buyers are waiting for better quality. With its eye on Chinese prices, Egypt has also started to raise its prices, asserting that this year’s crop is not as large as last year’s and that there is no more carryover.

The Heat: Heat Exhaustion and Heatstroke/Sunstroke

The symptoms of heat exhaustion or heatstroke can start slowly and appear innocent, but this is a potentially dangerous situation, especially among the young and elderly. A person might feel dizzy, faint, nauseous, or drowsy. They might be confused or disoriented, have a headache, fever, rapid heartbeat, or hyperventilation. A temperature over 104 degrees F {40 degrees C} is a sure warning sign unless the person has just momentarily become hot from exercising in the sun. When the body’s thermoregulation system is overwhelmed, the person stops sweating which is a sure sign of trouble, especially if the skin becomes hot and dry and flushed red. Also, the person can be feeling cold and shivering, even though heatstroke is the cause. It’s easy to think that heatstroke won’t happen in humid conditions, but humidity reduces the evaporation of perspiration and so keeps heat in. Whatever the circumstances of heat exhaustion, heatstroke, or sunstroke, it is important to get medical attention as soon as possible.

Meanwhile, get the person out of the sun and into the cool. Remove any unnecessary clothing. Attempt to cool them down in any way possible, using cool water sponging, cool compresses, a water spray, or regularly replaced cold, wet towels. Key areas to try and cool down are the head, neck, armpits, wrists, and groin. If nothing more than water is available, pour it over the person’s head and over the key areas. As soon as possible, get the person in a cool shower or, better still, into a bath of cool water. This option, however, is not advisable if the person is elderly or has cardiovascular disease, because it can raise blood pressure.

If pouring water over the body, apply 1 drop of neat eucalyptus radiata to the back of the neck. When sponging, use ice-cold water with eucalyptus radiata and lavender oils added and continue for at least 24 hours. One quick dowsing with water will only lower the body temperature by one-hundredth of a degree, which isn’t going to be enough. Alternatively, if immersing the person in a cold-water bath, add 4 drops each of eucalyptus radiata and lavender essential oil. Apply neat lavender or eucalyptus radiata to their temples, the back of their neck, and the solar plexus – the upper abdomen – and have them breathe deeply.

Although the person with heatstroke may not feel thirsty, they should drink plenty of liquids. If you can’t find rehydration packs in the local stores, make up your own as described below**. Heatstroke can develop over days and takes a few days to recover from it. Keep an eye on the patient throughout this time.

Heat Cramps

Heat cramps can occur after unaccustomed exercise and perspiration, with loss of body fluid and electrolytes. Drink plenty of water and take rehydration drinks, or make your own and massage the legs with the following oil:

Heat Cramps

Geranium: 2 drops

Eucalyptus Radiata: 3 drops

Blend together and then dilute by adding 3-5 drops to each 1 teaspoon {5mL} of carrier oil.

Prickly Heat

Prickly heat {miliaria rubra} is a rash of tiny blisters that can look like little pink or red spots. Caused by blocked sweat glands, it is extremely itchy. It can affect any part of the body, and the best line of action is to keep as cool as possible and expose the area to air only cover with light cotton clothing.

Apply a splash to the area, made by diluting 6 drops each of eucalyptus radiata, lavender, and chamomile roman to a teaspoon of alcohol {vodka is fine} and shaking it all in a large cup of spring water. Warm baths are very soothing if you add to them 4 drops each of eucalyptus radiata and lavender essential oil.

Including baking soda in the bath is a good solution. If you can use this method, you only need lavender oil, but – and this is important – add the lavender to the baking soda and mix them together before putting in the bath; don’t just put them in separately. Below are the amounts you will need for various age groups. If wanting to help a baby, try to get hold of calamine lotion. Add 2 drops of chamomile german {or chamomile roman} and 2 drops of lavender to 2 tablespoons {30 mL} of calamine lotion. Alternatively, bathe the baby in a warm bath, ensuring the folds of the skin are thoroughly dried afterward.

Baking Soda Blend for Prickly Heat: Babies

Baking soda: 1/2 cup

Lavender: 1 drop

Mix the lavender essential oil with the baking soda thoroughly before adding a small amount to the bath. If the baby is under 12 months, this quantity is enough for four baths; if between 12 and 24 months, this makes enough for three baths.

Baking Soda Blend for Prickly Heat: Children Age 2 to 7 Years

Baking soda: 1/2 cup

Lavender: 2 drops

Mix the lavender essential oil with the baking soda thoroughly before adding to the bath. This quantity is enough for two baths.

Baking Soda Blend for Prickly Heat: Children Age 8 to 10 Years

Baking soda: 1/2 cup

Lavender: 3 drops

Mix the lavender essential oil with the baking soda thoroughly before adding to the bath. This quantity is enough for two baths.

Baking Soda Blend for Prickly Heat: 11 Years to Adult

Baking soda: 1 cup

Lavender: 3-4 drops

Mix the lavender essential oil with the baking soda thoroughly before adding to the bath.

**Rehydrating Blend

Drink plenty of fluids to replace those lost and take a rehydration formula drink to replace electrolytes. If you can’t get one, make your own:

Bottled water: 1 pint {475 mL}

Sugar: 3 level teaspoons

Salt: 1/4 teaspoon

Lemon essential oil: 1 drop {or fresh lemon or lime juice}

Mix together well and drink one small glass at a time.

A warm bath with 4 drops each of geranium and ginger essential oil diluted in a small amount of carrier oil often helps to calm the nerves, and at the very least it will make you feel better.

The Sun; Overexposure to Sun, Sea, and Wind

summer solstice sunDespite repeated warnings that skin cancer is caused at least in part by exposure to the sun, people still flock to the beach, where they lie prostrate, soaking in as much sunshine as they can. Hopefully, they are wearing a high factor sunscreen. But lying on the beach more than half naked with nothing much to do does provide the perfect opportunity to make a detailed note, in writing, of the mole’s we have. And as we seldom lie on the beach alone, our companion can examine the back of our body too. Making a mole map might turn out to be the most useful souvenir you take home with you, especially if you update it regularly to identify any new moles or any changes in existing ones.

One important thing to remember when using essential oils in the sun is that a few of them are what are known as photosensitive oils. This means they could increase our skin’s sensitivity to the sun.

Sunburn can vary considerably in degree. If the burn is severe and there is blistering, medical assistance may be required. If there is simply redness or a feeling of skin tightness and soreness, one effective first aid treatment is the miraculous oil of lavender.

As with all burns, it’s crucial to first get the heat out of the skin, so fill a sink or bath with cold water, add ice if possible, and immerse the sunburnt area as soon as you can. Then apply 1 or 2 drops of neat {undiluted} lavender essential oil over the sunburned area, bearing in mind that 1 or 2 drops of lavender will go quite a long way. You don’t need to overdo it; simply make sure that the lavender has covered the reddened area. If you haven’t got any lavender with you, use chamomile instead. Then, if you have it to hand, cover the area with cooling aloe vera gel. Pregnant women should not use lavender in this way, but they can use the aloe vera gel on its own.

If you do this, by morning hopefully you won’t notice a thing if you weren’t sunburned too badly. But do stay out of the sun for at least three days, even if the area looks perfectly fine.

Taking care of skin that’s been exposed to more than the usual amount of sunshine makes sense, and the following after-sun oils will also help repair it.

After-Sun Oil

Lavender: 10 drops

Chamomile-german: 5 drops

Geranium: 2 drops

Dilute in:

Sweet almond oil: 4 tablespoons {60 mL}

Sesame oil: 3 tablespoons {30 mL}

Apply as a body oil after showering or bathing, paying particular attention to areas of skin that have been overexposed to the sun.

After-Sun Bath Oil

Chamomile-roman: 4 drops

Geranium: 2 drops

Lavender: 2 drops

Dilute these after-sun bath essential oils in 1 tablespoon {15 mL} of jojoba oil and add it all to a bath. While in the bath, gently smooth the oil over the areas that have been exposed to the sun.

The following body and face oil is very effective in the drying conditions of wind and sun, such as experienced when skiing, sailing, or hiking.

Apres Ski, Sun, Sail, and Hike Oil

Chamomile-roman: 8 drops

Geranium: 8 drops

Lavender: 8 drops

Dilute in:

Jojoba oil: 2 teaspoons {10 mL}

Sesame seed oil: 1 teaspoon {5 mL}

Evening primrose seed oil: 1 teaspoon {5 mL}

Almond oil, sweet: 2 tablespoons {30 mL}

Blend the ingredients together well and use the oil every night before sleeping.

 

In Essence; Spring Aromas

There’s something special about spring. Spring makes things new, it revitalizes your surroundings. The sun warms the earth, seeds begin to sprout and flowers bloom. It awakens the senses from a dormant state that winter engulfs. It is like a new beginning. It’s like the definition of hope: the feeling that what is wanted can be had, or that events will turn out for the best. It is as if starting anew.

Aromatherapy can help us harmonize ourselves with the movement of the incoming season. Let’s take a look at some regenerating essential oils that you can incorporate this Spring…

  1. Lavender Its name in Latin “lavare” means to wash or to clean. Lavender is harmonizing to the spirit and when inhaled, it can calm an agitated mind and lift the mood almost instantly. Reduces stress and overall tension while bringing luster and balance to the skin.
  2. Palmarosa also known as “Indian geranium oil” is such a delight! Its light, citrusy-grassy-rose aroma is warming to the body, relaxes tight muscles, lessens pain and reduces inflammation*. Its sweet perfume is healing, regenerating and uplifting to the mood.
  3. Bergamot “Sunshine in a bottle.” It allows us to “relax and let go” and gives a feeling of freshness, joy, and energy in cases of sadness and depression caused by fatigue and unreleased tensions and frustration.
  4. Geranium The oil of balance. Geranium balances overall and is a beautifying oil that can help us be more productive, reconnect with ourselves and “feel life” again. 
  5. Coriander It refreshing and spicy aroma is grounding and soothing. Diffuse in the air to give the room a little spruce.
  6. Lime Detoxifying and purifying, lime enhances circulation and is revitalizing. Its sharp aroma enhances energy and mental clarity.
  7. Scotch Pine The fresh aroma often reminds us of the hiking through the forest. It is purifying, warm and cleansing while helping keep us alert and mentally clear. Dilute with a carrier oil and massage to soothe sore muscles and joints after gardening or strenuous workouts.
  8. Roman Chamomile transition into spring with ease with this precious oil. It can help bring emotional stability in times of nervousness, restlessness, exhaustion, stress, tension, grief, and depression.
  9. Lemongrass Strengthening of the nervous system, anti-infectious, and eases muscular aches and pains, among many other things. It helps us concentrate when we need to think clearly and is uplifting and energizing.

“Is the spring coming?” he said. “What is it like?”…
“It is the sun shining on the rain and the rain falling on the sunshine…”
― Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

Bergamot Oil

Bergamot “Sunshine in a Bottle” (Citrus bergamia)

Sunshine in a bottle”, as many Aromatherapists can relate when we refer to Bergamot. Just a drop or two can elevate the mood and bring smiles almost instantly. The oil of Bergamot we carry is extracted through cold pressing the peel of the Bergamot fruit and is grown in the Ivory Coast. It is named after the Italian city of Bergamo in Lombardy, where the oil was originally sold.

Bergamot Essential Oil is a balancing oil that can be used to lift the spirit in times of depression, melancholy, stress or tension; while also calming anxiety, nervousness, stress, and fear. It is considered in Aromatherapy as a relaxant and sedative.* As a matter of fact, it is one of the most studied essential oils for helping with anxiety and its effects can be enhanced with other essential oils.

It gives a feeling of freshness, joy, and energy in cases of sadness and depression caused by fatigue and unreleased tensions and frustrations.  Bergamot helps us to “relax and let go” especially when we have pent-up feelings. It reminds us that life is good for promoting optimism and lifting off our shoulders physical and emotional tension.
It also stimulates hormone secretion and thus helps maintain proper rates of metabolism.

Interesting facts: Bergamot is a hybrid of the bitter orange and lemon.  It was and still is a primary ingredient in one of the first ‘eau de cologne’ formulas, and continues to this day to be found in a number of ‘high end’ perfumes and colognes. Earl Grey Tea is lightly flavored with a hint of Bergamot.

Feeling stressed? Take the time to inhale the sweet, exotic citrus aroma of Bergamot. Here are more ways you can use it…

Bergamot Blends well with:
Lavender, Basil, Clary Sage, Cedarwood,  Cypress, Frankincense, Geranium, Peppermint, Nutmeg, Rosemary, Sandalwood, Ho Wood and all citrus oils such as orange and tangerine.

Bergamot is found in the following Eternity Blends: HappinessAnxietyClear MindConfidence, and Stress Relief.

“Rays of Sunshine”- Make this synergy by adding the following in a 5ml Amber bottle:
2 tsp Bergamot
1 tsp  Sweet OrangeTangerineClementine or Blood Orange (your choice)
½ tsp Geranium

How to use this Synergy:

  • Add a few drops to your diffuser to brighten up the room.
  • Make a room spray: Add up to 80 drops of the synergy first to a 4oz aluminum bottle with atomizer. Add witch hazel. Mix. Then add purified water.
  • Make a massage oil to lift away stress and tension. Mix 10-12 drops + 1oz carrier oil in an amber glass bottle.
  • Add a drop or 2 to a tissue and inhale when in need of a quick “pick me up”.

 

** Caution: Citrus essential oils and the sun do not get along. Do not use photosensitizing essential oils prior to going into a sun tanning booth or the sun.

Geranium Essential Oil: Creating A Complete Balance

There is so much to say about the “flower of constancy”. Its elegant aroma is fresh, green and sweet with a strong rose note. Its sweetness increases as it evaporates into the atmosphere. A strong oil that is also light and soft at the same time that eases mental stress and worries, while lifting the spirits. So, did that grab your attention to want to know more? This is one of my all-time favorite Essential Oils that I keep in my travel kit. I make sure I never run out of Geranium Essential Oil.

The oil is distilled from the leaves. The name Geranium derives from the Greek word geranos or ‘crane’ because the seed pods resemble the shape of crane’s bills. It has been used widely in perfumery and soap manufacturing since the 19th century. There are more than 700 varieties of Geranium, however, only about 10 provide the Essential Oil. In the Victorian era, scented Geraniums were grown along the edges of pathways or placed pots indoors in the winter where women’s wide crinoline skirts would brush past and release their pleasant scent. Who would have thought that people went to such great lengths to steal these precious flowers from others gardens just to get their hands on them? There is something addicting about Geranium…

Regenerate Your Body and Mind

Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) is considered among Aromatherapists as oil to promote overall balance. Geranium has a way of transmitting feelings of strength and security, therefore used to calm both chronic and acute anxieties as well as depression; especially involving exhaustion and fatigue due to over-work. It is used to reconnect us to “feeling life”. Because life can throw us a lot of curve balls, Geranium can help us reconnect emotionally and start to “feel” again…to have a thirst for life and its enjoyments or pleasures. It can bring us back to center, grounding us to help us see things clearly and take charge.

This majestic oil can help balance emotions and promote a sense of inner peace and well-being. Being sedative and uplifting when needed, it is an ideal essential oil for stress-related disorders such as tension headaches, anxiety/depression, agitation, mood swings, frustration, fatigue, and muscle aches.

Be Productive

Do you ever get that feeling of being “stuck”? This oil is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to strengthen the flow of Qi-energy and is blood circulating, and also helps to clear and dispel stagnation. This makes it especially helpful for you to put your visions and thoughts into action.

Reproductive and Endocrine System* 

Geranium is used in Traditional Aromatherapy to help cope with hormonal imbalances during menopause and PMS and the baggage that comes with it such as hot flashes, menstrual cramps, water retention, mood swings and more. It supports the adrenal cortex to help balance the hormones. It is famous in Aromatherapy to help cool a hot temper! Because it helps us to release tension and negative emotions, it can be used to encourage feelings of sensuality as well.

Beauty

Geranium Essential Oil is commonly used by skin care specialist during facials because it is very nourishing and balancing to the skin. It is soothing to the mucous membranes and helps to cleanse and balance sebum production from oily to dry skin while restoring tone. It makes a great body treatment or massage oil for cellulite. Geranium Essential Oil is one of the few that has been used successfully against the MRSA bacteria in laboratory studies.

A Perfect Fit

Geranium blends well with many oils including Bergamot, Lemon, Grapefruit, Lavender, Clary Sage, Orange, Peppermint,  Frankincense, Jasmine, Rose, Ylang Ylang, Roman Chamomile, and Eucalyptus.

Geranium Essential Oil’s benefits in Aromatherapy are so diverse. From balancing the body and mind, easing nervous tension and anxiety*, to promoting productivity when feeling “stuck,” Geranium Essential Oil helps to put us back on track where we want to be. Its aroma is strong, sweet, yet at the same time is elegant and soft. It has “Yin” properties; therefore it’s a superb oil for women to keep in their Essential Oil kit.

Since there are so many great benefits from the “oil of balance” I wanted to share some very useful recipes that you can incorporate into your Aromatherapy life.

Soothe the Skin: Use in the bath or massage on the body.
4 drops Geranium
2 drops Frankincense
1 Tbsp. Almond Oil

Peaceful Sleep: Add the following to the diffuser in your bedroom.
3 drops Geranium
2 drops Lavender
1 drop Orange

A Brush of Ahhh: To refresh your mind and/or intrigue your partner, add one drop to your hairbrush and brush into your hair.

Body powder– To feel beautiful and sensual mix the following in jar with a tight lid, and allow to sit for a day before using.
5 drops Geranium
2 drops Ylang Ylang
¼ cup Corn Starch or Arrow Root Powder

Chill Out Bath: Calm Irritability, sit back, relax and inhale. Mix with 1 cup Epsom salts + 1 tbsp castile soap + Apricot Carrier Oil (or any carrier oil of your choice)
4 drops Geranium
4 drops Tangerine
2 drops Lavender
1 tablespoon Apricot Carrier Oil

Balancing & Uplifting Massage & Body Oil: This makes an excellent massage oil to promote Geranium’s balancing properties while helping release overall tension. Mix the following in a 2 oz. amber glass bottle.
8 drops Geranium
6 drops Lavender
5 drops Bergamot
4 drops Grapefruit
2 oz. Grapeseed Oil or any carrier oil of your choice

Bye, Bye Baby Blues– A blend that can help moms cope with post-natal blues. Make a body oil by diluting in 2 oz. of your favorite carrier oil (ex. Almond, Grapeseed, Olive) inside an amber glass bottle. You may also use as a diffuser blend by mixing 2 drops of each.
10 drops Geranium
10 drops Grapefruit
5 drops Orange

Anxiety Ease Blends– Use the formulas below as you wish in the bath, in your diffuser or as a massage oil.

Massage Oil – Dilute in 1 oz. carrier oil (ex. Almond, Grapeseed, Olive) inside an amber glass bottle. Gently massage over your pulse points, abdomen and behind your neck and shoulders.
3 drops Geranium
4 drops Clary Sage
7 drops Bergamot

Diffuser
3 drops Geranium
1 drop Clary Sage
3 drops Bergamot

Bath
Mix with 1 cup Epsom salts + 1 tbsp castile soap:

•4 drops Geranium
•4 drops Bergamot
•2 drops Clary Sage

Inner Peace – Diffuse in the air of a sense of calm and to promote happiness.
2 drops Geranium
2 drops Frankincense
2 drops Orange

Geranium is wonderful, isn’t it?! What do you like to do with it? Please let us know in the comment section down below.

In Essence: Geranium Essential Oil

IN ESSENCE…

    • Pelargonium graveolens is the Geranium species that is most commonly cultivated for the extraction of the sweet-smelling essential oil.

 

    • Used in aromatherapy applications, Geranium Essential Oil reduces feelings of stress, anxiety, sadness, fatigue, and tension, enhances concentration, improves cognitive function, and balances the emotions as well as the hormones.

 

    • Used cosmetically or topically in general, Geranium Essential Oil is reputed to effectively eliminate dead cells, tighten the skin, promote the regeneration of new skin, and diminish signs of aging.

 

  • Used medicinally, Geranium Essential Oil works as an anti-inflammatory and antiseptic agent. It is reputed to enhance circulation, soothe symptoms of menstruation and menopause, reduce blood pressure and pain, and boost immunity.

HISTORY OF GERANIUM OIL

As early as the time of the ancient Egyptians, Geranium Oil has been used in a vast range of applications including the promotion of a clear, smooth, radiant complexion, the balancing of hormones, the alleviation of anxiety and fatigue, and the improvement of moods. When the Geranium botanical was introduced to Europe in the late 17th century, its fresh leaves were used in finger bowls. Traditionally, Geranium Essential Oil has been used as an insect repellent and it has also to flavor food, soft drinks, and alcoholic beverages.

Although this perennial shrub is indigenous to South Africa, the Geranium plant is now cultivated throughout the world, namely in Central America, Europe, the Congo, Egypt, Russia, and Japan. The Geranium species that is most commonly cultivated for the extraction of the sweet-smelling essential oil is Pelargonium graveolens. Depending on the country in which the specific varieties of Geraniums originate, Geranium Essential Oils may exhibit differing properties.

GERANIUM OIL BENEFITS

The main chemical constituents of Geranium Essential Oil are: Linalool, Geranyl formate, Citronellol, and Geraniol.

LINALOOL is believed to exhibit the following activity:

  • Sedative
  • Anti-depressant
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-anxiety
  • Anti-epileptic
  • Analgesic

GERANYL FORMATE is believed to exhibit the following activity:

  • Anti-fungal
  • Hepatoprotective
  • Aromatic (fresh, green, floral, fruity)

CITRONELLOL is believed to exhibit the following activity:

  • Anti-fungal
  • Sedative
  • Anti-viral
  • Anti-microbial
  • Anti-spasmodic
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-oxidant
  • Anti-convulsant

GERANIOL is believed to exhibit the following activity:

  • Anti-oxidant
  • Anti-bacterial
  • Anti-septic
  • Analgesic

Used in aromatherapy applications, Geranium Essential Oil is known to reduce feelings of stress, anxiety, sadness, fatigue, and tension, thereby enhancing the general sense of well-being and relaxation, while offering relief to those suffering from insomnia. Its sweet, uplifting floral scent makes it an ideal ingredient in the manufacturing of soaps and cosmetics, such as creams and perfumes. Furthermore, the scent of Geranium Oil is known to enhance concentration, improve cognitive function, and balance the emotions as well as the hormones. Its calming and tonic properties are known to regulate several body systems, including the respiratory and circulatory functions. This facilitates functions such as nutrient absorption and digestion, and as a result, it improves general health. When Geranium Oil is combined with any of the following essential oils, it is known to contribute to a blend that is aromatically appealing: Angelica, Basil, Bergamot, Carrot Seed, Cedarwood, Citronella, Grapefruit, Jasmine, Lavandin, Lavender, Lemon, Lime, Neroli, Orange, and Rosemary.

Used cosmetically or topically in general, Geranium Essential Oil is reputed to contribute to the health of the skin cells and ultimately the health of the complexion. It is known to effectively eliminate dead cells and to promote the regeneration of newer, healthier skin, thus benefitting the acne-prone skin. Its astringent property helps tighten the skin and to diminish the appearance of the symptoms of aging, such as sagging and wrinkling skin. For decades, Geranium Oil has also been used to promote hair growth by nourishing the scalp and balancing the production of sebum and natural oils.

Its anti-bacterial properties make Geranium Oil an ideal ingredient in cosmetic deodorants, as it eliminates body odor and leaves the body through perspiration.

When applied in a massage, Geranium Essential Oil is known to encourage muscles to contract, which firms the appearance of muscles and results in the body looking toned over time. By increasing collagen production, Geranium Oil is known to enhance elasticity and to maintain the skin’s softness and smoothness, which is especially beneficial on skin that has been exposed to chemicals, UV radiation, or rough physical activity. When used regularly, diluted Geranium Oil is also advantageous for strengthening loose, aging, or acne-prone skin. On scars, unwanted spots, blemishes, stretch marks, and cuts, Geranium Oil’s cicatrizant property is known to accelerate healing and fading. While boosting skin’s regenerative ability, it also evens out skin tone and the appearance of cellulite.

Used medicinally, Geranium Essential Oil works as an anti-inflammatory and anti-septic agent making it a beneficial ingredient for use in moisturizers that are meant to treat skin ailments such as excessive oil, acne, eczema, dermatitis, and psoriasis. It is reputed to enhance circulation, soothe symptoms of menstruation and menopause, and reduce blood pressure as well as pain. When applied to wounds, Geranium Oil is known to protect them against toxins and infections, which then allows the body to boost its immunity from within rather than directing its efforts to an external challenge. By creating blood clots, Geranium Oil stems the flow of blood, which accelerates the healing of wounds. It is reputed to address the discomforts of eczema, Athlete’s Foot and other fungal infections, burns, frostbite, and even sore throats.

 Geranium Oil is reputed to have many therapeutic properties. The following highlights its many benefits and the kinds of activity it is believed to show:

    • COSMETIC: Anti-Inflammatory, Relaxing, Balancing, Astringent, Deodorant, Tonic
    • ODOROUS: Anti-Inflammatory, Relaxing, Balancing, Decongestant, Deodorant, Anti-Depressant, Uplifting
  • MEDICINAL: Anti-Inflammatory, Relaxing, Astringent, Tonic, Anti-Viral, Anti-Bacterial, Decongestant, Anti-septic

GERANIUM OIL USES

Used in aromatherapy applications, the sweet scent of Geranium Oil is uplifting, energizing, and inspiring, offering a sense of positivity and good health, both physically and mentally. To diminish feelings of sadness and stress and to enhance cognitive function, diffuse 2-3 drops of Geranium Essential Oil in an essential oil diffuser. This has the added benefit of soothing a sore throat and addressing sinus infections.

For a cosmetic fragrance that balances the mood and that can be applied to the wrist, the inside of the elbows, and the neck in the same way as a regular perfume, first select a Carrier Oil of a personal preference. In a dry glass container, pour in 2 Tbsp. of the chosen Carrier Oil, then add 3 drops Geranium Essential Oil, 3 drops Bergamot Essential Oil, and 2 drops Lavender Essential Oil. Cover the container and shake it well to thoroughly blend all the oils together. To use this natural, homemade perfume, simply dab a few drops onto the aforementioned pulse points. Alternatively, a cosmetic fragrance can be made in the form of a natural deodorant by combining 5 drops of Geranium Essential Oil and 5 Tbsp. of water in a spray bottle. This refreshing and anti-bacterial body spray can be used daily to eliminate body odors.

Used in topical applications, Geranium Oil’s astringency makes it beneficial for tightening skin that is affected by symptoms of aging, such as wrinkles. To firm the appearance of sagging skin, simply add 2 drops of Geranium Essential Oil to a face cream and apply it twice daily until there are visible results. To tighten larger areas of skin, create a massage oil by diluting 5 drops of Geranium Essential Oil in 1 Tbsp. of Jojoba Carrier Oil before massaging it into the affected areas, concentrating especially on muscles that are likely to sag. Geranium Oil is reputed to not only tone the abdomen and support the growth of new skin but to also facilitate the efficacy of the metabolism.

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For a facial serum that that slows the look of aging, pour 2 Tbsp. of a Carrier Oil of personal preference into a dark 1 oz. glass dropper bottle. Recommended oils include Argan, Coconut, Sesame, Sweet Almond, Jojoba, Grapeseed, and Macadamia. Next, pour in 2 drops Geranium Essential Oil, 2 drops Lavender Essential Oil, 2 drops Sandalwood Essential Oil, 2 drops Rose Absolute, 2 drops Helichrysum Essential Oil, and 2 drops Frankincense Essential Oil. As each essential oil is added, gently shake the bottle to thoroughly incorporate it. Cleanse and tone the face before massaging 2 drops of the resultant serum into the face, focusing more on areas with fine lines, wrinkles, and age spots. When the product has absorbed into the skin, moisturize with a regular cream. When the product is not in use, store it in a cool and dark area.

For a gentle oil blend that enhances skin’s health and appearance, especially on skin afflicted by ailments such as acne and dermatitis, simply dilute 5 drops of Geranium Essential Oil in 1 tsp. of Coconut Carrier Oil. Next, gently massage this blend onto the affected area twice daily. It can be used every day until results are visible. Alternatively, 2 drops of Geranium Essential Oil can be added to a regular facial cleanser or body wash.

For a hair conditioner that gently hydrates and restores the natural pH of the scalp for strands that appear and feel softer and healthier, first combine 1 cup water, 2 Tbsp. Apple Cider Vinegar, and 10 drops of Geranium Essential Oil in a 240 ml (8 oz.) glass spray bottle or in a BPA-free plastic spray bottle. Shake the bottle vigorously to thoroughly blend all the ingredients together. To use this conditioner, spray it onto the hair, allow it to soak in for 5 minutes, then rinse it out. This recipe should yield 20-30 uses.

Used in medicinal applications, Geranium Oil is reputed to be ideal for addressing fungal and viral ailments, such as shingles, herpes, and Athlete’s Foot, as well as problems related to inflammation and dryness, such as eczema. For an oil blend that is moisturizing, soothing, and regenerative for feet affected by Athlete’s Foot, combine 1 Tbsp. Soya Bean Carrier Oil, 3 drops Wheatgerm Carrier Oil, and 10 drops Geranium Essential Oil in a dark bottle. To use, first soak the feet in a warm foot bath consisting of Sea Salt and 5 drops of Geranium Essential Oil. Next, apply the oil blend to the foot and massage it thoroughly into the skin. This can be done twice daily, once in the morning and again in the evening.

For an anti-bacterial bath that facilitates the elimination of bodily toxins and inhibits the onset of external contamination, first combine 10 drops Geranium Essential Oil, 10 drops Lavender Essential Oil, and 10 drops Cedarwood Essential Oil with 2 cups of Sea Salt. Pour this salt blend into a bathtub under hot running water. Before entering the tub, ensure that the salt has dissolved completely. Soak in this aromatic, relaxing, and protective bath for 15-30 minutes to stimulate better circulation and to promote the faster healing of blemishes, wounds, and irritations.

A Geranium Oil massage blend is known to ease puffiness, remove excess fluid in the skin and tissues, and firm sagginess. For a blend that tightens the skin and improves muscle tone, dilute 5-6 drops of Geranium Essential Oil in 1 Tbsp. Olive Carrier Oil or Jojoba Carrier Oil and gently massage it over the entire body before taking a bath or shower. For a calming massage blend that is reputed to address muscle tension and nerve pain, dilute 3 drops of Geranium Essential Oil in 1 Tbsp. of Coconut Carrier Oil. This blend is also beneficial for issues with inflammation, such as arthritis.

For an anti-microbial remedy that not only soothes and disinfects scrapes, cuts, and wounds, but that also quickly stops the bleeding, dilute 2 drops of Geranium Essential Oil in water and wash the affected area with this mixture. Alternatively, Geranium Essential Oil can be diluted in 1 Tbsp. of Olive Carrier Oil and spread in a thin layer on the affected area. This application can be continued daily until the wound or irritation heals or clears up.

Alternatively, a remedial salve can be made with the addition of several other healing essential oils: First, place a double boiler on low heat and pour 30 ml (1 oz.) Beeswax into the upper half of the double boiler until the wax melts. Next, add ¼ cup Almond Carrier Oil, ½ cup Jojoba Carrier Oil, ¾ cup Tamanu Carrier Oil, and 2 Tbsp. Neem Carrier Oil and stir the mixture. Remove the double boiler from the heat for a few minutes and allow the blend to cool down without allowing the Beeswax to harden. Next, add the following essential oils, making sure to whisk in each one thoroughly before adding the next: 6 drops Geranium Essential Oil, 5 drops Lavender Essential Oil, 5 drops Cedarwood Essential Oil, and 5 drops Tea Tree Essential Oil. When all the oils have been added, mix the combination once more to ensure complete blending, then pour the final product into a tin car or a glass jar. Continue stirring the blend occasionally and allow it to cool. This can be applied in a small amount to cuts, wounds, scars, and bug bites. When the product is not in use, it can be stored in a cool and dry area.

Geranium Oil is known to provide relief for feminine issues such as the discomforts associated with menstruation. For a relieving massage blend that soothes the uneasy symptoms, such as pain, soreness, and tightness, first, pour ½ cup of a Carrier Oil of personal preference into a clean and dry bottle. Recommended Carrier Oils include Sweet Almond, Grapeseed, and Sunflower. Next, add 15 drops Geranium Essential Oil, 12 drops Cedarwood Essential Oil, 5 drops Lavender Essential Oil, and 4 drops Mandarin Essential Oil. Cap the bottle, gently shake it to thoroughly combine all the ingredients, and allow it to sit overnight in a cool and dry area. To use this blend, gently massage a small amount of it onto the skin of the belly and the lower back in a clockwise direction. This can be used daily for a week leading up to the beginning of the menstrual cycle.

A GUIDE TO GERANIUM OIL VARIETIES & THEIR BENEFITS

GERANIUM ESSENTIAL OIL (BOURBON)

Botanical Name: Pelargonium graveolens L’Her.

Method of Extraction and Plant Part: Steam distilled from leaves & flowers

Country of Origin: China

Believed to:

  • Have the same therapeutic properties as other varieties of Geranium Oil, but to be the preferred variety among aromatherapists, due to its more preferable fragrance
  • Be both mentally and physically balancing, soothing, and regulating
  • Stabilize hormones and negative moods
  • Regulate sebum production in both dry and oily skin
  • Promote cell regeneration
  • Encourage blood clotting to promote the faster healing of wounds
  • Enhance immunity and boost resistance to stress
  • Have uplifting properties that enhance the mood to reduce feelings of anxiety, nervousness, irritability, and sadness
  • Exhibit deodorizing and disinfecting properties
  • Reduce the appearance of cellulite

GERANIUM ESSENTIAL OIL (EGYPTIAN) / GERANIUM ORGANIC ESSENTIAL OIL

Botanical Name: Pelargonium graveolens Pelargonium x asperum

Method of Extraction and Plant Part: Steam distilled from leaves & flowers

Country of Origin: Egypt

Believed to:

  • Balance and enhance the complexion
  • Be ideal for use in addressing feminine ailments related to reproductive health
  • Have uplifting properties that enhance the mood to reduce feelings of anxiety, nervousness, irritability, and sadness
  • Exhibit astringent properties that cause the skin, tissues, and muscles to contract in order to leave the face and body looked clear, toned, and tightened
  • Stimulate and enhance circulation
  • Have anti-oxidant, anti-fungal, and anti-bacterial properties that may prevent viral infections
  • Facilitate the body’s elimination of toxins
  • Enhance digestion and reduce the chances of developing flatulence

ROSE GERANIUM ORGANIC ESSENTIAL OIL

Botanical Name: Pelargonium roseum x asperum

Method of Extraction and Plant Part: Steam distilled from leaves

Country of Origin: South Africa

Believed to:

  • Have the same therapeutic properties as other varieties of Geranium Oil
  • Usually be used in combination with other floral essential oils, often with Lavender, or to soften more herbaceous scents
  • Often be used to extend the more expensive Rose Oils or the endangered Rosewood Oil, when it is available.
  • Be a staple ingredient for formulators who rely on essential oils for their high-end fragrance profiles

ROSE GERANIUM SOUTH AFRICAN ESSENTIAL OIL

Botanical Name: Pelargonium roseum X asperum

Method of Extraction and Plant Part: Steam distilled from petals

Country of Origin: South Africa

Believed to:

  • Have the same therapeutic properties as other varieties of Geranium Oil
  • Be one of the most fragrant species of Rose Geranium
  • Be used in perfumery and in the cosmetics industry, as it can be made to imitate many other fragrances
  • Be often used to ‘stretch’ the scent of much more expensive Rose Oils

CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR GERANIUM OIL

Geranium Oil should never be ingested due to its toxicity. It is imperative to consult a medical practitioner before using this oil for therapeutic purposes. Pregnant and nursing women are especially advised not to use Geranium Essential Oil without the medical advice of a physician, as it may have an effect on certain hormone secretions and it is unclear whether these effects are transferable to babies at these stages of development. The oil should always be stored in an area that is inaccessible to children, especially those under the age of 7.

Due to Geranium Oil’s styptic property, those with the following health conditions are recommended to be advised: diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure and other heart-related ailments, peptic ulcers, liver damage, bleeding disorders, skin disorders, or hormone-related ailments. Individuals that are taking prescription drugs, undergoing major surgery, or who are at a greater risk of experiencing strokes, heart attacks, or atherosclerosis are also advised to seek medical consultation prior to use.

Prior to using Geranium Oil, a skin test is recommended. This can be done by diluting 1 drop of the Essential Oil in 4 drops of a Carrier Oil and applying a dime-size amount of this blend to a small area of skin that is not sensitive. Geranium Oil must never be used near the eyes, inner nose, and ears, or on any other particularly sensitive areas of skin. Potential side effects of Geranium Oil include sensitization, rashes, and a burning sensation.

Those seeking medical care to manage moods, behaviors, or disorders should treat this essential oil as a complementary remedy rather than a replacement for any medicinal treatments or prescriptions. In the event of an allergic reaction, discontinue use of the product and see a doctor, pharmacist, or allergist immediately for a health assessment and appropriate remedial action. To prevent side effects, consult with a medical professional prior to use.

 

DIY Moisturizing Skin Serum

Growing up, I was fed the beauty myth that oily skin is bad. The cosmetics industry pushes the use of harsh, drying soaps and products that strip natural oils to help you get rid of shine. However, those natural oils actually help moisturize your skin. Washing them away can result in overly dry skin, rather than soft and supple skin. Really what you want is skin-loving oils like the serum recipe below paired with a nice, gentle astringent for a balanced regimen.

Using natural plant oils is a wonderful way to help nourish and refresh dry skin. Some of my favorites are organic rosehip seed oil, pomegranate seed oil, and tamanu oil. I love how quickly they absorb into the skin, leaving my face soft, but not greasy. Organic plant oils like these are used in the base of most homemade lotion recipes. Lotions often include butters or waxes to help smooth the skin and seal in the moisture. Using oil neat will allow it to absorb into the skin very quickly, and I prefer using this preparation first for daily facial moisturizing. However, you can use this serum as an oil base in a cream recipe if you like. This serum is wonderful for softening the skin on arms and legs as well.

For high-quality skin oils, you want to make sure that they are certified organic and minimally processed. I like to use cold-pressed or expeller-pressed oils that are unrefined. It’s also important to keep them in a cool, dark place. I store mine in the refrigerator and buy often. Because they are minimally processed, high-quality oils can turn rancid if not properly stored. Keep in mind,  a little oil goes a long way.

Okay, it’s time to feed your skin some luscious serum! I use this recipe first thing after showering in the morning and again before bed. I find it especially helpful for dry or sensitive skin, but feel free to play with other carrier oils and essential oils to craft a serum that is perfect for you.

MOISTURIZING SKIN SERUM RECIPE

Ingredients

Carrier Oil Base
  • 2 oz. organic jojoba oil or organic sunflower oil
  • 1 oz. organic tamanu oil
  • 1 oz. organic rosehip seed oil
  • ½ oz. organic pomegranate seed oil
  • ½ tsp vitamin E oil
Essential Oils

Directions

Pour all carrier oils together into a glass bottle and roll between your palms to mix. Carefully drip each essential oil into the carrier base and roll again to distribute. Use less essential oils if you have skin or fragrance sensitivities. Invert the bottle several times and roll again. Use a coin-sized amount as a facial serum or allover body oil each day.

Make Your Own Green Tea Skin Serum

There is no point in stretching the truth…I am 60 years old and while I have tried to take good care of my skin over the years, my skin-care strategy is evolving as my body ages.As a teenager and young adult, it was all about absorbing extra oil and striving for blemish-free skin. Throughout my thirties and early forties, I used a water-based moisturizing cream with sunscreen daily, and that worked well to help combat the rigors of a busy life.

Recently, I’m finding my skin needs a bit more nourishment and moisture and I’ve been working on creating face and skin treatments that have more of the good oils and concentrated botanicals to meet the requirements of my ever-aging skin. I never would have dreamt of putting oils directly on my face when I was 21, but now my skin seems to soak it all in—leaving my face feeling soft and nourished.

I’ve been reading a great deal lately about the benefits of green tea antioxidants as one of Nature’s many gifts, especially in skin care applications. I thought I might give it a try and use it as a base for a skin serum created specifically for more “seasoned” skin…

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Green Sencha Skin Serum

This recipe makes approximately 1 cup of skin serum, which is quite a bit! You can use this as a whole body oil or divide it up and share. The recipe is also easy to half or quarter if you’d like to make a smaller amount.

The first step is to create an infused oil. I used about 1 cup of organic Green Sencha Leaf Tea and covered it completely with organic olive oil in a 1-pint mason-type jar. Allow this to infuse for 4-6 weeks, shaking regularly and making sure the tea stays completely covered with oil. After infusing, strain. Compost the tea.

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a glass jar and shake well to combine.
  2. Pour into a dark amber or cobalt blue bottle or jar to protect from light and store in a cool, dark place. This does not need to be refrigerated.
  3. Apply by pouring a small amount in the palm of your hand and gently spread on your face using non-dominant fingers (avoid using your pointer finger or thumb as they put more pressure on your skin.)
  4. You can also use a dropper to collect the oil for application.

What Are the Best Essential Oils for Sunburn?

Too much exposure to UV sunlight can overwhelm the body’s immune system, resulting in sunburn. Some essential oils contain compounds that reduce the symptoms of sunburn and promote healing.

Many active ingredients found in essential oils have more than one positive regenerative, or protective effect. As most essential oils contain more than one active ingredient, many have a long list of potentially associated health benefits.

Here we will look at eight of the best essential oils for sunburn and what the science says about them, along with more information.

Fast facts on essential oils for sunburn:

  • Many essential oils have long been used in traditional and herbal medicines.
  • Researchers are still testing the therapeutic and clinical use of essential oils.
  • The most common side effect associated with the use of essential oils is skin irritation.

What does the scientific evidence say?

Essential oil being dripped into a bottle
The risk of sunburn might be reduced by using vitamin E essential oil, as it may absorb UV rays.

To date, no large-scale human studies exploring the association between essential oil use and sunburn healing have been carried out.

Many smaller-scale studies have shown promising results, however.

Case study from the Journal of Pediatric Nursing

2017 study looked at two young girls with similarly extensive burns, medical histories, and treatment, but one girl was also given an essential oil mixture.

The girl who received the oil treatment developed only one hospital-acquired infection compared to the other girl who developed two infections in her bloodstream and four hospital-acquired infections.

Also, the girl receiving oil treatment stayed in the intensive care unit for 1 day less and in the hospital a total of 4 days less than the other girl. This is a small study, and more extensive studies are needed, but this does provide some evidence for the use of essential oils in the treatment of burns.

Eight best essential oils for sunburn

Of the few studies exploring the benefits of essential oils for sunburn recovery, most have concluded that oils need to be applied as soon as possible after sunburn to receive the benefits.

Most studies also support the recommendation that essential oils should not be applied to areas where the skin is very thin or near heavily hormone-regulated organs, like the genitals, eyelids, mouth, and breasts.

1. Vitamin E essential oil

Some studies have suggested that vitamin E may reduce the risk of sunburn by:

  • acting as an antioxidant
  • absorbing UV rays
  • helping thicken the outermost layer of the skin

Vitamin E essential oil has also been shown to help improve the ability of the skin to maintain moisture and reduce inflammation.

The only known side effect associated with vitamin E essential oil use is minor skin irritation. Always dilute essential oils.

2. Vitamin C essential oil

Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, has been shown to have several benefits that may help reduce symptoms of sunburn and improve healing time.

Studied health benefits of ascorbic acid include:

  • protecting against UVA and UVB rays
  • improving inflammatory skin symptoms and conditions
  • improving collagen production, the compound that gives skin its elasticity
  • correcting pigmentation problems to improve the skin’s natural protection against UV rays

The only known complication associated with vitamin C oil used topically is skin flushing, or redness and warmth.

3. Peppermint essential oil

Though peppermint (Mentha piperita) contains several active ingredients with known health benefits, the most powerful by far is menthol.

Studied health benefits of menthol include:

  • anti-inflammatory
  • antibacterial
  • antifungal
  • antiseptic (able to kill or discourage the growth of infectious agents)
  • vasoconstrictor, narrowing inflamed blood vessels

Quality peppermint oil should contain at least 44 percent free menthol.

The only known side effect associated with menthol is minor skin irritation and redness.

4. Lavender essential oil

Lavender essential oils with fresh lavender
Lavender essential oil may have properties that are anti-inflammatory, which may reduce redness and swelling.

Extracts from the lavender plant (Lavandula officinalis) have at least seven active ingredients known to promote skin regeneration and boost immune function.

Lavender essential oil is also known to have properties that are:

  • antibacterial
  • anti-inflammatory
  • antifungal

This helps reduce symptoms of pain, redness, and swelling while also lowering the risk of infection.

Lavender has been associated with the growth of breasts in very young or pubescent boys. However, symptoms went away within a few months after individuals stopped using the oil.

Possible symptoms of lavender allergy include:

  • skin rash
  • nausea and vomiting
  • chills
  • fever
  • headache
  • substantial inflammation or swelling of the skin

In rare cases, lavender has also been known to cause an allergic response.

5. Tea tree essential oil

Extract from the needle-like leaves of the tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) plant has been used as a herbal remedy for a variety of health problems including most skin conditions.

The active ingredients in tea tree oil give it properties that are:

  • anti-inflammatory
  • immune boosting
  • antibacterial
  • antifungal
  • antiviral

Tea tree oil has been associated in rare cases with serious complications. Known side effects of tea tree oil use include:

  • red, itching, burning skin
  • eczema
  • very dry skin
  • scaling skin
  • fluid build up in or under the skin
  • weakness
  • stomach pain
  • unexplained weakness
  • slow or unsteady movements
  • in some individuals, tea tree oil can cause a blistering disorder
  • counteract other medications
  • unusual blood changes

6. Geranium essential oil

Extracts from the shrub geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) contains at least 12 active ingredients that have properties that are:

  • antibacterial
  • anti-microbial
  • anti-cancer
  • anti-inflammatory

Geranium oil has also been proven useful as a sedative and nerve tonic, so may provide even more powerful pain relief from sunburn.

Skin irritation is the only known side effect associated with geranium oil use.

7. Chamomile essential oil

Roman chamomile (Anthemis nobilis) has been used for centuries, potentially even thousands of years, as a multi-use herbal remedy because of its soothing and calming properties.

With more than 10 active ingredients that have known health benefits, chamomile oil has established anti-inflammatory properties. It has also been shown to promote or increase wound healing.

Chamomile essential oil is considered a staple herbal remedy and used for a wide array of skin conditions, including boils, sunburn, and psoriasis.

Though rare, chamomile has been known to cause a full body allergic response.

8. Eucalyptus essential oil

Eucalyptus essential oil
Eucalyptus essential oil may help with sunburn recovery.

Extracts from the evergreen plant eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), is known to contain compounds proven to be:

  • antioxidant
  • anti-inflammatory
  • antibacterial

They have also been shown to have anti-proliferative, or anti-cancer, action, by preventing the spread of cancerous cells. Do not take eucalyptus oil orally.

Though they rarely occur, eucalyptus oil has been linked to several side effects including:

  • allergic rash
  • drowsiness
  • difficulty breathing, especially in children
  • drug interactions

Are there any side effects

Never swallow essential oils as some are toxic.

Essential oils should never be applied directly to the skin or mixed with water. Before applying essential oils to their skin, people must dilute the oils in a carrier oil. The usual recipe is 3 to 5 drops of essential oil to 1 ounce of carrier oil.

Carrier oils are commonly mineral oil, coconut oil, or sweet almond oil. Essential oils can also be infused into the air to be inhaled as aromatherapy.

Complications associated with the use of essential oils include:

  • skin sensitization or irritation, especially to oils that contain phenols and aldehydes
  • photosensitivity, or sensitivity to the sun
  • eye and mucous membrane irritation
  • in rare cases, allergy
  • if oils are inhaled, they may also cause mild lung, throat, or mouth irritation
  • if ingested may cause mild gastrointestinal discomfort

The United States Food & Drug Administration (FDA) do not monitor herbs and essential oils, so before buying, it is always best to research brands for quality, purity, and a good reputation.

Who should not use essential oils?

Individuals more at risk for developing side effects, or who should avoid essential oil use, include:

  • pregnant or breastfeeding women
  • people with immune or inflammatory conditions, especially involving the skin
  • people with pigment or photosensitive disorders
  • people with allergies to common essential oil compounds, such as alcohols and aldehydes
  • infants and young boys
  • essential oils should not be taken orally

More at-home remedies for sunburn

Natural items can be added to mixtures or used alongside essential oils to reduce sunburn symptoms and healing time.

Common additives used in at-home sunburn remedies include:

  • aloe vera
  • apple cider vinegar
  • coconut oil
  • milk
  • black tea
  • oatmeal
  • baking soda
  • yogurt

Aromatherapy/Essential Oils for Anxiety

Anxiety refers to the mental and physical signs experienced in response to perceived danger. When events, people, or even our own thoughts threaten us, our bodies experience a physiological and mental arousal that helps us cope with the threat. Some of the physical and mental symptoms of anxiety—such as nausea, rapid breathing, and heart rate, trembling, fear, dread, and worry—can be soothed using aromatherapy or essential oils.

Which Essential Oils Help Anxiety?

A number of essential oils are used individually or in blends to relieve anxiety. Several essential oils appear to have an effect on the neurotransmitters in the brain that play a role in anxiety. Sampling includes:

  • Bergamot: This essential oil is best at relieving stress and depression that can accompany anxiety.
  • Clary Sage: It alleviates the stress and exhaustion that often accompany anxiety.
  • Lavender: Commonly found in massage products, it has a calming effect on the mind as well as muscle tension that can accompany anxiety.
  • Patchouli: This oil also relieves stress and fatigue.
  • Roman chamomile: It is often used in an herbal tea, but is also commonly found in massage products due to its calming effect. Like lavender, it is helpful when anxiety is accompanied by insomnia. It also helps relieve nausea.

Other essential oils used to soothe anxiety include cedarwood, frankincense, geranium, mandarin, neroli, rose, sandalwood, and vetiver.

Using Aromatherapy/Essential Oils to Relieve Anxiety

Aromatherapy is the use of essential oils from plants for psychological and physical healing. Essential oils are concentrated extracts taken from the roots, leaves, or blossoms of plants. These oils, also called essences, can be used as inhalants, applied topically to the skin, and, in some cases, ingested to relieve symptoms of a variety of health conditions including anxiety.

Essential oils can be used in a number of ways. They can be added to massage oils or creams, or to a carrier oil. A carrier oil is a cold-pressed vegetable oil derived from the fatty portion of a plant, usually from the seeds, kernels or the nuts. Examples of carrier oils are olive oil, sweet almond oil, grapeseed oil, and apricot kernel oil. After an essential oil is mixed with a carrier oil, it can be applied directly to the skin or added to a bath. The hot water of a bath complements the relaxing effects of the essential oil, providing additional benefit to someone suffering from anxiety.

You can also inhale essential oils by the process of diffusion. To diffuse essential oils, you disperse them so that their aroma fills the area with natural fragrance. Many methods exist for diffusing oils into a room, such as sprinkling a few drops of an essential oil on a tissue or adding drops of oil to a bowl of boiled water. Commercial products for diffusion include lamp rings, clay pots, candles, and electric diffusers.

How Do Aromatherapy and Essential Oils Work?

Essential oils are the pure essences of plants. They contain the plant’s own mix of active ingredients, which determines the healing properties of the oil. The naturally occurring chemicals found in essential oils work in synergy with one another. A synergistic essential oil blend, or one in which the healing properties of one oil complement the properties of another oil, is considered to be greater in total action than each oil used independently. Because essential oils are volatile substances, meaning they evaporate quickly, their molecules are easily inhaled. The oils provide triggers to our brain. These triggers affect our emotions and also provide physical benefit.

Is Aromatherapy Safe?

Essential oils are highly concentrated and can be harmful if not used carefully. By following the guidelines listed below, you should be able to safely use aromatherapy to treat anxiety.

  • Essential oils should never be used undiluted on the skin due to potential allergic reactions (there may be exceptions made by experienced aromatherapy users and practitioners). To test the oil, dilute only 1 drop of the essential oil with the carrier oil and apply the mixture on your skin, and cover with a bandage. Wait at least 24 hours to see whether irritation occurs.
  • Some essential oils, particularly those from the Citrus family, may cause skin sensitivity to sunlight. These oils include lemon, lime, bitter orange, grapefruit, and neroli, mandarin and bergamot listed above. Therefore, wait at least 5 hours after using them and before exposing your skin to ultraviolet sun rays, otherwise, your skin might redden and burn.
  • Some essential oils should be avoided during pregnancy or by those with asthma, epilepsy, or other health conditions. People with asthma and other respiratory conditions should avoid inhaling essential oils. Those with high blood pressure should avoid various essential oils, including sage, rosemary, eucalyptus, thyme, and rose, which is listed above to address anxiety.
  • When using essential oils, use the smallest amount of essential oil needed to soothe your senses and reduce anxiety. Only a few drops are needed for the oil to bring about a balance to body tissues and emotions.
  • Not all essential oils are suitable for aromatherapy. Wormwood, pennyroyal, onion, camphor, horseradish, wintergreen, rue, bitter almond and sassafras are some of the essential oils that should only be used by qualified aromatherapy practitioners due to their toxic effect if used excessively.
  • Keep essential oils away from children, and never let children use essential oils without adult supervision. Treat the oils with the same caution that you would use with medicine.
  • Essential oils should only be taken internally after receiving a detailed consultation and prescription from a trained aromatherapy practitioner.
  • Essential oils are flammable. They should never be stored near fire or an open flame, or burned in a diffuser without water. They maintain their therapeutic effect if kept out of direct sunlight in cool, dark places or in a refrigerator.

The U.S. government does not regulate the use of the word “aromatherapy” on product packaging, labeling or in product advertising so any product can be marketed as a product suitable for aromatherapy. There are many products on the market that contain unnatural ingredients, including fragrance oils, which claim to be aromatherapeutic. It is important to look at the ingredient label when seeking true aromatherapy products.